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Standardizing the Display of IBR Data: Property Variables

Tables Presented by the FBI

In the FBI's preliminary tables using NIBRS, data were used to illustrate NIBRS content and capabilities by providing simple, easy-to-understand tables and charts.  Two tables use property type to show the kind of property loss reported and the value of recovered/seized property.  The value is an estimate made by law enforcement at the time of the loss.

Value of Property Loss Due to Criminal Action, Property Type, 1998

Property Type Total Loss Burned Counterfeit/ Forged Destroyed/ Damaged/
Vandalized
Stolen, etc.
Computer Hard/ Software $48,330,569 $2,601 $6,727 $501,368 $47,819,873
Jewelry/Precious Metals 86,325,793 525 1,852 62,548 86,260,868
Money 112,433,486 251,256 1,787,491 42,981 110,351,758
Motor Vehicles 861,521,886 5,848,263 115,280 74,662,593 780,895,750
Negotiable Instruments 38,109,178 201 19,163,806 8,284 18,936,887
Radios/TVs/VCRs 59,891,379 7,353 3,241 721,715 59,159,070
Structures 69,959,641 40,208,694 632 28,491,792 1,258,523
Tools 253,867,162 27,472 1,276 442,548 253,395,866
Vehicle Parts/Accessories 74,847,183 274,879 7,244 28,882,889 45,682,171
Other 1,140,974,509 9,223,992 801,884,646 39,729,471 290,136,400
Total $2,746,260,786 $55,845,236 $822,972,195 $173,546,189 $1,693,897,166

To create this table, property types were grouped into categories ("motor vehicles" includes automobiles, buses, other motor vehicles, recreational vehicles, and trucks; "structures" includes single occupancy dwellings, other dwellings, other commercial/business, industrial/manufacturing, public/community, storage, and other structures).  Only the property with the loss types of burned, counterfeit/forged, destroyed/damaged/vandalized, and stolen are selected.  A cross tabulation is then created, totalling the value for each category of property loss type.  As you can see, over $2 billion worth of property was reported lost due to criminal action in 1998.  

Download SPSS code to replicate this table
Note: Please check that the variable names used in this syntax match the variable names in your data file.  If you need assistance, contact JRSA.


Value of Property Recovered/Seized by Law Enforcement Agencies, Property Type, 1998

Property Type Total Recovered Seized
Computer Hardware/Software $1,922,775 $1,883,348 $39,427
Jewelry/Precious Metals 4,645,696 4,530,376 115,320
Money 11,049,922 3,920,207 7,129,715
Motor Vehicles 289,264,838 283,146,133 6,118,705
Negotiable Instruments 3,104,545 2,634,481 470,064
Radios/TVs/VCRs 2,818,482 2,625,917 192,565
Structures 250,250 66,434 183,816
Tools 2,709,119 2,690,632 18,487
Vehicle Parts/Accessories 1,862,655 1,861,162 1,493
Other 33,287,329 28,754,954 4,532,375
Total $350,915,611 $332,113,644 $18,801,967

To create this table, property types were again grouped into categories ("motor vehicles" includes automobiles, buses, other motor vehicles, recreational vehicles, and trucks; "structures" includes single occupancy dwellings, other dwellings, other commercial/business, industrial/manufacturing, public/community, storage, and other structures).  Only the property reported as recovered or seized by law enforcement selected.  A cross tabulation is then created, totalling the value for each category of property loss type. 

Of the $1.7 billion worth of property stolen, embezzled, etc., agencies reported recovering 20% ($332 million).  The most sucessful recovery rate was for automobiles, with $781 million stolen and $289 million recovered.  Money ($7 million) and motor vehicles ($6 million) accounted for the largest seizure rate.

Download SPSS code to replicate this table
Note: Please check that the variable names used in this syntax match the variable names in your data file.  If you need assistance, contact JRSA.