BJS/JRSA 2010 National Conference:  October 28-29, 2010 in Portland, Maine
Agenda
Pre- and Postconference Seminars
Hotel and Travel Information
Speaker Biographies
Session Abstracts
  Pre- and Postconference Seminars

1. Addressing Offender Population Management Issues using Risk Assessment: An Introduction to the LS/CMI
Tuesday, October 26, 8:00 a.m. - 12:00 noon

Seminar Description: The Level of Service/Case Management Inventory (LS/CMI) is the most recent version of the widely used Level of Service Inventory-Revised (LSI-R). This tool, which incorporates a case management function, measures the risk and need factors of late adolescent and adult offenders. This seminar will orient participants to risk and needs assessments, focusing on the LS/CMI. It will provide an overview of the research on risk/need instruments, including the research/theory behind the LS series, and discuss why the instruments are important. A central goal of the workshop is for participants to leave with a better understanding of the relevance of the LS/CMI to their state and whether they should pursue adopting such an instrument in their state/jurisdictions. Group discussion will highlight how such instruments as the LS/CMI can be used as part of a comprehensive plan for addressing offender population management issues via diversion strategies and early release mechanisms. Seminar participants will also use group discussion and interactive exercises to learn how such instruments are administered, how scores are calculated, and how scores are used in the development of comprehensive offender supervision and treatment plans.

Instructor:
Stephen Haas, Ph.D.
Statistical Analysis Center Director
West Virginia Division of Criminal Justice Services



2. Conducting Statewide Crime Victimization Surveys
Tuesday, October 26, 8:00 a.m. - 12:00 noon

Seminar Description:Many states have taken it upon themselves to conduct their own victimization survey, because the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) cannot be parsed to the state level. State-specific crime victimization surveys provide an opportunity for policy makers and criminal justice researchers to gain a greater understanding of the characteristics of crimes, victims, and offenders in a particular locale. In this seminar, we will discuss sample size parameters, sampling methodologies, question construction, and how to maximize your response rate. We will identify potential problem areas, such as Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval, cell phone/land-line bias, and data imputation. We will also share examples of previous state surveys. This practical seminar will provide attendees with a better understanding of the components of a state crime victimization survey.

Instructors:
Mark Rubin, Research Associate
Muskie School of Public Service
University of Southern Maine

Al Leighton, Manager, Survey Research Center
Muskie School of Public Service
University of Southern Maine



3. Cost-Benefit Analysis
Tuesday, October 26, 1:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Seminar Description: Policy makers often decide where to invest limited tax revenues without having a way to estimate the expected return on that investment. Cost-benefit analysis, however, can provide policy makers with an estimate of the benefits of investing in a given program. This seminar will provide a step-by-step description of the methodology used to create a cost-benefit model for programs designed to reduce crime. We will discuss how to estimate tax payer and victimization costs of crime, and also how to use an effect size of a program to determine the estimated number of crimes avoided and the estimated benefit of avoiding them. This seminar is designed to be very practical, giving analysts the resources to develop a cost-benefit model in their state.

Instructor:
Mike Wilson, Economist/Statistical Analysis Center Director
Oregon Criminal Justice Commission



4. Improving Your Presentations
Tuesday, October 26, 1:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Seminar Description: Most professionals are expected to deliver presentations to committees, colleagues, and various public audiences. However, in addition to content knowledge, making an effective presentation can involve good design skills, creative communications capabilities, and the ability to successfully engage audience members. Unfortunately, most of these skills have not been taught in schools, which means that staff must usually learn them on the job. This course will discuss considerations when planning a presentation, tools for creating computer slideshows, effective graphics design, and improving public speaking skills. In preparation for the class, the attendees will have access to the instructor's blog, which will initiate discussions on these issues and provide additional resource materials.

Instructor:
Jim Zepp, Director of Training and Technical Assistance
Justice Research and Statistics Association



5. Examining Questions and Controversies Regarding the Use of Evidence-Based Programs and Practices
Wednesday, October 27, 8:00 a.m. - 12:00 noon

Registration for Seminar #5 is closed. To be placed on a waiting list, email kstier@jrsa.org.

Seminar Description: Though researchers have produced a lot of information about what works in criminal justice, questions and controversies persist about the use of evidence-based programs and practices. This seminar will explore some of these questions and controversies in an attempt to address how to overcome them. Some of the issues to be addressed include: how to support innovation and evidence-based programs, implementation of evidence-based programs under different circumstances and in different settings, and whether and how criminal justice can learn from evidence-based controversies and resolutions in fields outside of criminal justice. This seminar will include a guided, interactive discussion among participants. Participants are expected to read materials provided in advance in order to contribute to the discussion.

Instructor:
Mary Poulin, Ph.D., Senior Research Associate
Justice Research and Statistics Association



6. Basic Evaluation Concepts and Methods
Wednesday, October 27, 1:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Seminar Description: This workshop is designed to provide participants with a basic yet comprehensive overview of program evaluation essentials. Participants will learn the critical concepts, key terms, and primary methods used in the evaluation of criminal justice programs. Basic evaluation theory and principles, logic models, performance measurement, process evaluation, and outcome evaluation will be covered. Key considerations in managing an evaluation project and working with an evaluator also will be discussed.

Instructor:
Roger Przybylski, President/Consultant
RKC Group
Lakewood, Colorado



7. The Magic Behind Effective Web Sites
Saturday, October 30, 8:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Seminar Description: The Statistical Analysis Centers (SACs) serve as points of access to criminal justice data, research, and statistics. This information is often presented in publications that are useful to local, state, and national criminal justice agencies, policy makers, researchers, academicians, the media, and many others. Making these resources available via the Internet facilitates the sharing of the wealth of information produced by and housed in the SACs as well as other criminal justice entities. This workshop will focus on designing an effective website, with an emphasis on the content and the "magic" required to produce a user-friendly, informative, and dynamic presence on the Internet. Participants will have an opportunity to interact and learn from each other's experiences.

Instructor:
Cindy Durrett, Government Analyst
Statistical Analysis Center
Florida Department of Law Enforcement