BJS/JRSA 2009 National Conference - October 22-23, 2009 in St. Louis, Missouri
Agenda
Pre- and Postconference Seminars
Hotel and Travel Information
Speaker Biographies
Session Abstracts
 
Speaker Biographies



ABREU, DAN has been employed as the Associate Director of the National GAINS Center since June 2005. As Associate Director, he provides technical assistance to communities and states on mental health and criminal justice collaboration across the criminal justice spectrum and assists the Director in the planning and development of expert meetings that address various issues relating to justice-involved persons with mental illness. Mr. Abreu is former Associate Director of Operations at Central New York Psychiatric Center (CNYPC). In his capacity of Associate Director, he oversaw reentry planning activities for individuals with mental illness who were returning to the community from prison and oversaw the development of the Sing Sing CORP Re-entry Program. He formerly held positions with CNYPC as Regional Supervisor and as Chief of Mental Health Service at Sing Sing Correctional Facility and Bedford Hills Correctional Facility, the only female maximum security prison for women in New York State. Prior to employment with CNYPC, Mr. Abreu coordinated jail mental health services in Albany and Rensselaer counties in New York State.

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ADAMS, CHRISTINE is a Statistical Analyst for the Office of Research and Statistics (ORS) within the Colorado Division of Criminal Justice, Department of Public Safety. Dr. Adams completed her Ph.D. at the University of Wyoming in 2007 and served as a graduate assistant at the Wyoming Survey & Analysis Center (WYSAC) of the University of Wyoming. Since joining ORS in the fall of 2007, Dr. Adams has helped staff the Governor's Criminal and Juvenile Justice Commission, which includes writing annual reports on the progress and recommendations of the Commission as well as facilitating task force and workgroup meetings. In addition, Dr. Adams has helped evaluate multiple offender programs.

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ANASTASIA, TRENA T. is an Assistant Research Scientist at the University of Wyoming. Now in her second year at the Wyoming Survey & Analysis Center, she has put her 10 years of publishing experience to use in writing annual reports. She recently served as Principal Investigator on the Wyoming Drug Free Youth Groups study and enjoys all forms of social justice research, specifically, qualitative work. As a Women's Studies adjunct instructor, she enjoys teaching women and leadership as well as communications courses.

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ARRIGONA, NANCY is Director of Research with the Texas Juvenile Probation Commission. As Director she is responsible for conducting juvenile justice program evaluations, policy impact analysis, cost-effectiveness studies, performance measure development, the development and implementation of statewide assessment instruments and tools, and statistical modeling and analysis. Prior to her employment with the Juvenile Probation Commission, Ms. Arrigona was the Director of Research for the Texas Criminal Justice Policy Council. She has developed, designed, and directed evaluations of pilot and existing programs in corrections, juvenile justice, prevention, human services, mental health, and education. She acts as an advisor on the development of evaluation designs and the implementation of research efforts, and serves as a member to numerous advisory boards and task force efforts. Ms. Arrigona holds a Bachelor of Arts in government from the University of Texas at Austin and a Master of Public Affairs from the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs at the same institution.

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ASTION, MICA is a Research Analyst with the Research and Policy Analysis Division of the Office of Grants and Research, Massachusetts Executive Office of Public Safety and Security (EOPSS). Ms. Astion has been at EOPSS since 2007. She provides research support to the executive staff, most recently concentrating on domestic violence and sexual assault. She is the co-author of "Massachusetts Intimate Partner Homicide Review: An Overview of District Attorney Cases between 2005 and 2007," and will present the findings from this study during the conference. Ms. Astion has also authored a number of reports concerning sexual assault in Massachusetts, including "Understanding Sexual Victimization: Using Medical Provider Data to Describe the Nature and Context of Sexual Crime in Massachusetts, 2001-2006." Ms. Astion has an M.S. degree in criminal justice from Suffolk University, and a B.A. in sociology from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

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BALES, BILL is an Associate Professor in the College of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Florida State University. His interests include sentencing research, assessing the effectiveness and consequences of punishment and correctional strategies, and community reentry issues among incarcerated adult and juvenile populations. Prior to joining the faculty at Florida State in 2003, he was the Director of Research with the Florida Department of Corrections since 1991. He has also worked in various research capacities with the Florida Supreme Court and the Florida Department of Law Enforcement. He has published his research in various academic journals and government publications, and presented research findings at numerous corrections, criminal justice, and statistics conferences over the past 25 years.

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BECK, ALLEN J. is the Senior Statistical Advisor at the Bureau of Justice Statistics. He earned his Ph.D. in sociology with a specialty in population studies and survey methods at the University of Michigan. Mr. Beck is currently responsible for advising staff on all of BJS's statistical collections and analyses. In addition, he is responsible for implementation of the Prison Rape Elimination Act. He joined BJS in 1984 as a statistician in the corrections statistics program. In 1990 he became the chief of the corrections program. Past work has included national studies of recidivism, estimation of the lifetime chances of going to state or federal prison, analyses of trends in U.S. probation and parole populations, research related to rising incarceration rates, and studies of prisoner reentry. He serves on the Criminal Justice Program Advisory Board at the University of Maryland, University College. In 2008 he received the Peter P. Lejins Research Award from the American Correctional Association.

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BECK, RON has served with the Missouri Statistical Analysis Center (MoSAC) for 23 years and has been its Director since 1999. Under his direction, the MoSAC conducts criminal justice research, traffic safety research, and information systems development. He is a State certified project manager and serves in this capacity on several multi-agency information sharing development projects, including the Missouri Data Exchange and the Traffic Arrest System. Mr. Beck has been extensively involved with implementation of the Missouri Uniform Crime Reporting System, the Missouri Incident Based Reporting System, and mapping of methamphetamine labs, missing persons, and sex offenders. He has a Bachelor of Science degree from Washington State University and completed graduate studies at the University of Texas at Dallas.

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BILESKI, MATTHEW T. is a Research Analyst for the Statistical Analysis Center at the Arizona Criminal Justice Commission. Since beginning his research work in Arizona, Mr. Bileski has utilized the state criminal history records repository for a variety of research projects. His experience consists of research in the improvement of criminal history records, as well as studies employing the analysis of criminal history records. This includes "The Reporting of Sexual Assault in Arizona: 2006 and 2007&qwuot; report. Mr. Bileski is currently a member of the Subcommittee on Violence for the Arizona Injury Prevention Advisory Council. He received his M.A. in criminology and criminal justice at the University of Missouri-St. Louis and his B.A. in psychology and a B.A. in sociology at the University of Missouri-Columbia.

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BLOOD, PHYLLIS V. is a Justice Research Analyst with the Division of Criminal and Juvenile Justice Planning (CJJP), Iowa Department of Human Rights. She has worked for state and local government for 33 years. Duties at CJJP include providing correctional impact statements to the Iowa General Assembly for all proposed legislation with criminal penalties, staffing and providing research to the Sex Offender Research Council, staffing and providing research for the Criminal and Juvenile Justice Advisory committee, and providing technical assistance and data services to other state and local agencies. Ms. Blood has a Bachelor of Arts degree in sociology and a Master of Public Administration degree from Drake University.

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BOSTWICK, LINDSAY is a Research Analyst at the Illinois Criminal Justice Information Authority. She holds a master's degree from the University of Chicago. Her areas of interest are juvenile justice, using criminal history records in research, statistics and cost analysis, sex offender policy, and corrections. Her current research projects include mental health screening and assessment practices in the Illinois juvenile justice system and juvenile recidivism. She is also an adjunct instructor in criminal justice.

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BUGDEN, KRISTEN is currently a student at New England Law Boston. She received her master's degree in criminology with a certificate in forensic criminology from the University of Massachusetts-Lowell. She has presented research papers in the area of domestic violence and sexual abuse prevention.

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BURCH, ANDREA is a Statistician in the Law Enforcement Unit (LEU) at the Bureau of Justice Statistics. Her responsibilities include maintaining a current LEU web page, developing a longitudinal file for Law Enforcement Management and Administrative Statistics (LEMAS) data, and conducting multilevel analyses of changes in police organizations over time and their effects on reported crime. In addition, she is the program manager for BJS's Police Use of Force series. Prior to joining BJS, she taught research methods at the College of Criminal Justice at Northeastern University. She is pursuing a Ph.D. in criminology and public policy at Northeastern University. Recent training classes include Quantitative Analysis of Criminal Justice Data and Linear Regression.

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BURTON, SUE is the Director of Florida's Statistical Analysis Center (FSAC) at the Florida Department of Law Enforcement, and the 2008-09 president of the Justice Research and Statistics Association. She has been the FSAC Director since 1995 and has over 20 years of criminal justice experience. Her prior criminal justice experience includes working for the Florida Criminal Justice Standards and Training Commission, evaluating officer training and standards programs, conducting strategic planning, and developing an officer information system. She has also served as a researcher for the Florida Supreme Court in the areas of sentencing guidelines, jury management, plea bargaining, and court information systems. In 1998, she was awarded the prestigious Bureau of Justice Statistics' G. Paul Sylvestre Award. Ms. Burton is an International Association of Law Enforcement Certified Planner, and a graduate of Florida State University's College of Business.

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CATALANO, SHANNAN has worked as a Statistician in the Victimization Statistics Unit at the Bureau of Justice Statistics since 2003. Her areas of research include teen dating violence, stalking, long-term trends and measurement of crime over time, and National Crime Victimization Survey methodology. Dr. Catalano received her doctorate in criminology and criminal justice from the Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice at the University of Missouri- St. Louis in 2004.

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CHEESMAN, FRED, Principal Court Research Associate with the National Center for State Courts (NCSC), is an expert in evaluation methodology, forecasting, and statistical analysis. Major interests include juvenile justice, problem-solving courts, risk assessment, and sentencing. Since joining NCSC in 1997, Dr. Cheesman has worked on a number of major projects, which include forecasting caseloads for court facilities planning, time series analyses to investigate the effects of legislation designed to impact the rate of state prisoner litigation in federal courts, development of performance measurement systems for drug courts, drug court evaluations, evaluations of community courts, evaluation of risk assessment instruments used in sentencing, and investigations of blended sentencing. Prior to joining NCSC, Dr. Cheesman served on the faculty of the University of Baltimore with a joint appointment in the criminal justice and public policy divisions, also serving as a research associate with the Schaefer Center for Public Policy. He also spent a year as a visiting professor at Indiana University. Prior to this, he served as a researcher and systems analyst for 15 years with the Ohio Department of Youth Services, where he developed population forecasts for the agency and conducted program evaluations.

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CHIANCONE, JANET is Research Coordinator at the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. In this role, she is responsible for the coordination and integration of the agency's juvenile justice research, evaluation, and statistics initiatives, and oversees the agency's performance measures program. Previously, Ms. Chiancone was a Research Associate at the American Bar Association Center on Children and the Law, where she conducted research on parental kidnapping and child dependency court improvement. Her prior experience includes coordinating a local Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA) program and managing a Department of Education-funded research project that examined the impact of Head Start programs on homeless children and their families. She began her career working on community development, housing, and homelessness issues as a program developer. She has a Master of Science degree in family and community development from the University of Maryland. Her master's thesis examined the circumstances of homeless women who are separated from their children.

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CONNELLY, MICHAEL is currently Administrator of the Evaluation & Analysis Unit of the Oklahoma Department of Corrections. He previously served as executive director of sentencing commissions in Maryland and Wisconsin as well as research director for the Oklahoma Criminal Justice Resource Center, which staffed the state sentencing commission. He has also managed grant projects for the Justice Research and Statistics Association and been an associate professor of public policy and administration for Southwestern Oklahoma State University, as well as an adjunct for the University of Maryland, Norwich University, and the University of Oklahoma. His research has appeared in policy, political science, education, criminal justice, and sentencing journals as well as in government publications. He previously served on the executive board of the National Association of Sentencing Commissions. He received his Ph.D. in political science from the University of Missouri.

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COOK, MICHELLE is a Justice Systems Analyst with the Division of Criminal and Juvenile Justice Planning (CJJP) in the Iowa Department of Human Rights. Ms. Cook has been with the agency since 2006. She has a Bachelor of Arts in human behavior, a Master of Science in human development and family studies, and more than seven years of social science research and evaluation experience. Current and completed evaluation projects include statewide adult and juvenile drug court, dual diagnosis offender program, family drug court, juvenile justice outpatient substance abuse treatment program, regional drug task force, and women's correctional substance abuse treatment program.

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COVELLI, EMILY works for the Criminal Justice Policy Research Institute at Portland State University as the project manager for Oregon's Law Enforcement Contacts Policy and Data Review Committee. This committee is charged by the Oregon Legislature to explore community concerns over racial/ethnic bias in law enforcement practices, offer technical assistance to agencies that desire to collect traffic stop data, improve training for the state, and monitor public perceptions of law enforcement. Ms. Covelli received her M.S. in criminology and criminal justice and B.S. in psychology from Portland State University. Her interests are focused on research methods and statistics. She has pursued additional training in statistics, including attending an Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR) summer conference in 2008, to study multivariate data analysis, missing data, and multilevel modeling.

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COX, STEPHEN M. is a professor in the Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Central Connecticut State University. He holds a Ph.D. in criminal justice from Michigan State University. Dr. Cox has been the principal investigator in a number of research projects throughout the Connecticut criminal justice system. The projects consisted of evaluating policing programs (Weed and Seed and graffiti reduction), probation programs (probationer transitional programs, technical violations units, and mental health probation officers), and juvenile justice programs (alternative education programs for delinquents, school violence reduction, and juvenile review boards).

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CURRY, G. DAVID is Professor of Criminology and Criminal Justice at the University of Missouri-St. Louis. He is coauthor with Scott Decker of Confronting Gangs: Crime and Community. Dr. Curry is also author of Sunshine Patriots: Punishment and the Vietnam Offender, as well as numerous journal articles and book chapters. Dr. Curry's main areas of interest are organized violence and program evaluation.

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DECKER, SCOTT H. is Professor and Director of the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Arizona State University. He received the B.A. in social justice from DePauw University, and the M.A. and Ph.D. in criminology from Florida State University. His main research interests are in the areas of gangs, criminal justice policy, and the offender's perspective. His most recent books include European Street Gangs and Troublesome Youth Groups (Winner of the American Society of Criminology, Division of International Criminology Outstanding Distinguished Book Award, 2006) and Drug Smugglers on Drug Smuggling: Lessons from the Inside (Temple University Press, 2008, CHOICE Academic Press Book of the Year). His forthcoming book (with Hugh Barlow), Criminology and Public Policy: Putting Theory to Work, will be published in 2009 by Temple University Press.

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ENGLISH, KIM is the Director of Research for the Colorado Division of Criminal Justice. As Director, she manages a staff of professional researchers engaged in a variety of criminal and juvenile justice research and policy analysis activities, including program evaluations, correctional population forecasting, and actuarial risk scale development and implementation. These activities involve working with many stakeholder groups, including the parole board and supervising officers. In 1999, Ms. English received the G. Paul Sylvestre Award for outstanding achievement in advancing criminal justice statistics in the states. She has consulted with the Council of State Governments, the National Governors Association, the National Association of State Legislatures, the National Institute of Corrections, the Center for Sex Offender Management, the American Probation and Parole Association, and criminal justice agencies in states across the country. Ms. English recently coauthored chapters in The Sexual Predator, Vol. III: Law and Public Policy (edited by Schlank), Sexually Coercive Behavior: Understanding and Management (edited by Prentky, Janus, and Seto) and Sexually Violent Offenders: Law and Policy in North America (edited by Winick and Lafond).

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ENO LOUDEN, JENNIFER is an Assistant Professor of psychology at the University of Texas at El Paso. She earned a Ph.D. in psychology and social behavior from the University of California, Irvine, and a Master of Arts in clinical psychology from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Her research focuses on the experiences of offenders with mental disorders and how the criminal justice system supervises these offenders. Her recent studies in this area have examined topics such as probation officers' decision-making for offenders with mental health and substance abuse disorders, supervision practices of specialty mental health probation agencies, and the effect of social support on outcomes for probationers with mental health and substance abuse disorders.

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FARRAR-OWENS, MEREDITH is the Deputy Director of the Virginia Criminal Sentencing Commission. There, she plays a lead role in the development, implementation, and administration of Virginia's sentencing guidelines. She has conducted research on such subjects as offender risk assessment, sex offender recidivism, drug crime, and probation violators. For many years, she has performed analysis to assess the fiscal impact of proposed criminal justice legislation. Prior to arriving at the Commission in 1995, she worked for the Virginia Department of Criminal Justice Services, where, in addition to forecasting inmate populations, she served as technical staff for Governor George Allen's Commission on Parole Abolition and Sentencing Reform. The work of this group ushered in sweeping reform of Virginia's criminal justice system in 1994. She has also worked with Virginia's Department of Corrections and Department of Juvenile Justice. Ms. Farrar-Owens is a graduate of the University of Virginia, where she received a Bachelor of Arts degree in economics with a minor in government. She completed her master's degree in sociology at Virginia Commonwealth University. She is the current President of the National Association of Sentencing Commissions.

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FOSTER, HOLLY is an Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology at Texas A&M University. Her research uses state and national data to examine the influences of parental incarceration on children and young adults. Together with John Hagan, she has published related articles in Social Problems and The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Sciences.

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FREIVOGEL, MARGARET WOLF is the founding editor of the St. Louis Beacon and a veteran journalist with deep St. Louis roots. . She is enthusiastic about the prospects for new forms of journalism and is frequently asked to participate in national meetings about the future of news. She helped found and is on the steering committee of a new national organization, the Investigative News Network. In 2009, she was among the first online journalists invited to serve as jurors for the Pulitzer Prizes - recognition of the important role nonprofit online news organizations now play in upholding high quality reporting.

Ms. Freivogel grew up and currently lives in Kirkwood. She spent 34 years as a St. Louis Post-Dispatch reporter, Washington correspondent, and editor in areas ranging from sports and features to nation/world and Sunday editor. A proponent of in-depth coverage and high standards, she was instrumental in creating the paper's NewsWatch news analysis section and in writing the ethics policy. Her groundbreaking reporting on women in politics and other issues won numerous awards, including the National Press Club Washington Correspondent's Award and the National Bar Association Gavel Award. She was president of Journalism and Women's Symposium, a national organization. She left the Post-Dispatch in 2005 in the first wave of employee buyouts. The Beacon launched in the spring of 2008 with a staff that melds veteran journalists, technology and business experts, and talented, young digital "natives." She is a graduate of Stanford University.

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GARNER, JOEL is the Chief of the Law Enforcement Statistics Unit at the Bureau of Justice Statistics. He has published more than 40 articles on police response to domestic violence, police use of force, court delay, the prosecution of intimate partner violence and the use of experimental methods. Dr. Garner previously served as the deputy to the Director of Research at the National Institute of Justice, the Research Director at the U.S. Sentencing Commission, and the Director of Research at the Joint Centers for Justice Studies, Inc.

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GEST, TED is President of Criminal Justice Journalists, a national organization based in Washington, DC, and affiliated with the Jerry Lee Center of Criminology of the University of Pennsylvania and the Center on Media, Crime and Justice at John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York City. The group publishes a daily news digest, Crime & Justice News, at http://thecrimereport.org. Mr. Gest is a former reporter and editor at the St. Louis Post-Dispatch and U.S. News & World Report, where he covered the White House, the Justice Department, the Supreme Court, and criminal justice issues nationally. He is a graduate of Oberlin College and the Graduate School of Journalism at Columbia University. His book, Crime & Politics, was published in 2001 by Oxford University Press.

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GLAZE, LAUREN has been a Statistician with the Corrections Statistics Unit of the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) for 11 years. Her work has focused primarily on the community corrections populations and she has coauthored the BJS annual bulletin on probation and parole each year beginning with the 1998 report. More recently, Ms. Glaze has researched other special correctional populations, including incarcerated parents and inmates who have mental health problems. She has coauthored BJS special reports on both topics. Currently, Ms. Glaze is working with other BJS statisticians and mental health experts to develop a validated screener to estimate the prevalence of serious mental illness among prison and jail inmates. She is also managing a new BJS program that involves redesigning BJS's national omnibus surveys of prison and jail inmates, which have been conducted about every 6 years since 1974. She received her Master of Science degree from the Joint Program in Survey Methodology at the University of Maryland and her Bachelor of Arts degree in criminology and criminal justice from the University of Maryland.

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HAAS, STEPHEN M. is Director of the West Virginia Statistical Analysis Center (SAC). Dr. Haas holds a B.A. in psychology and political science from The Ohio State University, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in criminal justice from the University of Cincinnati. He has served as Principal Investigator and Project Director on several state and federally funded research projects and evaluations. Dr. Haas has also published numerous research reports and academic papers on various topics in the field of criminology and criminal justice education. His recent work has centered on the use of core correctional practices in offender reentry, the deterrent capacity of media awareness campaigns designed to reduce gun crime, gun availability and violent crime, the statistical accuracy of crime statistics, and racial disparity in the juvenile justice system.

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HARRISON, PAIGE has been a statistician with the Bureau of Justice Statistics since 2000. She managed the National Prisoner Statistics program until 2007, coauthoring two reports a year on the number and characteristics of prisoners in the nation. Since the passing of the Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) in 2003, she has managed several PREA collections, including the Survey of Sexual Violence, National Inmate Survey, and the National Survey of Youth in Custody. Ms. Harrison received a B.A from Ohio University in 1996, a master's in criminal justice from New Mexico State University in 1999, and is expected to complete her doctoral dissertation in justice, law, and society at American University in 2009.

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HARTLEY, DAN holds master's degrees in safety management and industrial and labor relations from West Virginia University (WVU). He also received his doctorate in technology education from WVU. In 1998, Dr. Hartley joined the Division of Safety Research at the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health in Morgantown, WV. As the NIOSH Workplace Violence Prevention Coordinator, he has developed and managed several nationally representative surveys, is working on workplace violence prevention field studies, and has formed several partnerships with private sector and governmental workplace violence prevention experts. He is leading an effort to create a publication for federal agencies that will provide the basis for developing a workplace violence prevention and facility security program that will meet or exceed OSHA standards for federal agencies. He has published and is currently working on manuscripts related to the costs of occupational homicides, workplace violence towards healthcare workers and pharmacists, and occupational-related assault cases reported through emergency departments. He has presented numerous times on various workplace violence prevention topics.

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HEIL, MARGARET "PEGGY" is a licensed clinical social worker. She has more than 20 years of experience developing and directing the Sex Offender Treatment and Monitoring Program at the Colorado Department of Corrections. She also provides training and consultation in sex offender treatment and management. She has been involved in a number of sex offender studies and has authored professional articles and book chapters related to sex offenders.

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HIRSCHEL, DAVID is a Professor of criminal justice at the University of Massachusetts Lowell and Professor Emeritus of criminal justice at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Before entering academics, he worked in the juvenile justice systems in both England and the United States, and served as Criminal Justice Coordinator for the Erie County, New York, Department of Anti-Rape and Sexual Assault. Dr. Hirschel's primary research and teaching interests are in victims of crime, particularly spouse abuse, international criminal justice, and legal issues in criminal justice. He has been involved in many funded research projects, both as a principal investigator and as a consultant, and has provided assistance to a wide variety of criminal justice agencies and social service organizations. He was Principal Investigator of the National Institute of Justice (NIJ)-funded Charlotte spouse abuse experiment and of the NIJ-funded project "Explaining the Prevalence, Context, and Consequences of Dual Arrest in Intimate Partner Cases."

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HUEBNER, BETH M. is an Associate Professor in the Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice at the University of Missouri-St. Louis. Her research interests include the collateral consequences of incarceration for offenders and their families, criminal justice decision making, and prisoner reentry. She is currently collaborating on a project on sex offender residency restrictions. She received her Ph.D. from Michigan State University in criminal justice, and she has served as a research associate for the Michigan Statistical Analysis Center.

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ISOM, DANIEL joined the Metropolitan Police Department in 1988. He was appointed Chief of Police on October 6, 2008. Colonel Isom has served in patrol, investigative, training, and administrative assignments during his tenure in the police department. He is a progressive advocate for elevating the standards of professionalism for law enforcement and strengthening the relationship between the police and citizens. He is a member of Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, the National Organization of Black Law Enforcement Executives (NOBLE), Missouri Police Chiefs Association (MPCA), International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP), Major Cities Chiefs Association (MCCA) and St. Louis Area Police Chiefs Association (SLAPCA). In addition, he is the coordinator and a coach for the Police Athletic League Track and Field Team (PAL). Colonel Isom holds a bachelor's, master's, and a Ph.D. degree from the University of Missouri-St. Louis in criminology and criminal justice, and a master's in public administration from St. Louis University. He is also a graduate of the FBI National Academy and the Police Executive Forum Senior Management Institute (PERF).

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KOHLER, JEREMY has been a staff writer for the St. Louis Post-Dispatch since 1998. His reporting in 2005 exposed the systematic under-reporting of sexual assaults and other crimes by the St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department. He has been a journalism instructor at Washington University in St. Louis since 2003.

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LANG, KAY is an Assistant Research Scientist with the Wyoming Survey & Analysis Center (WYSAC). She received her M.A. in criminology from the University of Leicester, U.K., in 1999, before adding to her education in the Department of Statistics at the University of Wyoming. While studying for her master's degree in criminology, she worked as a support officer with single homeless people at Leicester Night Shelter. At WYSAC, she is co-principal investigator on the Sexual Violence Prevention Needs Assessment; co-principal investigator on the WyoSafe Data Dictionary and Data Analysis; principal investigator on Sheridan's Drug Free Communities Grant; and she collaborates on the Strategic Prevention Framework State Incentive Grant.

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LANGTON, LYNN has been a Statistician at the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) since August of 2006. She is currently in the law enforcement unit working on projects related to gangs, private security, and law enforcement aviation units. Ms. Langton has also done work at BJS in the area of courts and adjudication, specifically, looking at state court organization, civil trials, and indigent defense. Ms. Langton is a doctoral student at the University of Florida.

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LAURITSEN, JANET L. is Professor in the Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice at the University of Missouri - St. Louis. Her research focuses on the measurement, causes, and consequences of violent criminal victimization. She has published more than 25 peer-reviewed articles and book chapters on this topic. She is currently working with Dr. Karen Heimer (University of Iowa) on a project funded by the National Institute of Justice to estimate long-term trends in violence against women and men by age, race, and ethnicity, and other sociodemographic factors. Dr. Lauritsen recently served on a panel of the National Academy of Sciences' Committee on National Statistics to review the quality and coverage of the nation's statistics on crime and justice. She is currently a member of the standing Committee on Law and Justice of the National Academy of Sciences, and recently served as Executive Counselor to the American Society of Criminology.

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MCMANUS, ROB has worked with the South Carolina Department of Public Safety's Statistical Analysis Center (SAC) since 1992 and has served as SAC Director since 1995. In that role, he has participated in research initiatives concerning domestic violence, sexual violence, and illegal drug use as well as other areas of concern. He continues to serve as research partner to the South Carolina District United States Attorney for Project Safe Neighborhoods. Previously, he worked in research and evaluation with the South Carolina Department of Probation & Parole for 10 years, and prior to that as a program evaluator with the Governor's Office of Criminal Justice Programs. He is currently serving as co-editor of the journal Justice Research and Policy, and has served on the Justice Research and Statistics Association's Executive Committee. He received a master's degree in criminal justice from the University of South Carolina and a bachelor's from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

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MATSUDA, KRISTY N. received her doctorate in 2009 from the Department of Criminology, Law and Society at the University of California, Irvine. In the fall of 2009 she joined the Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice at the University of Missouri-St. Louis (UMSL) as an Assistant Research Professor. Her general research interests include juvenile delinquency, juvenile justice, and gangs. Her current work examines the impact of incarceration on young offenders in California. At UMSL she is part of a team working on the national evaluation of a school-based gang and delinquency prevention program.

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MCGRAIL, TIMOTHY P. graduated from Lincoln University in Jefferson City, Missouri, in 1995 with a Bachelor of Science degree in criminal justice. He is also a 1999 graduate of the Northwestern University School of Police Staff and Command. Captain McGrail is a 25-year veteran with the Missouri State Highway Patrol. He served as a road officer in from 1984 to 1997. In 1997, he was promoted to the rank of Lieutenant and served as a Troop Lieutenant from 1997 to 2000. Captain McGrail achieved the rank of Captain in July 2000 and was transferred to the Patrol's General Headquarters in Jefferson City, Missouri, to serve in his current position as the Director for the Criminal Justice Information Services Division. Among his duties, Captain McGrail oversees the Missouri Criminal History Repository, the Automated Fingerprint Identification System (AFIS), the Access Integrity Section and Uniform Crime Reporting Section, and the Missouri Sex Offender Registry. Captain McGrail is Missouri's representative on the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact Council and Chairperson of the MORPHOTRAK Users' Group. He also serves on the Missouri Child Abuse and Neglect Review Board.

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MEREDITH, TAMMY is President and Co-Founder of Applied Research Services, Inc., an Atlanta-based consulting firm specializing in research, statistical analysis, and training. Dr. Meredith's current research efforts focus on identifying and managing high-risk offender populations. She is nationally recognized for developing automated risk assessment protocols and is currently directing a study funded by the National Institute of Justice to identify data-driven supervision protocols predictive of parole success. Her OPERATION ELIMI-CON secure web site with interactive mapping tools was recognized by the Attorney General as a Project Safe Neighborhoods "innovative practice" using technology to fight gun crime. Dr. Meredith received an M.A. degree from the State University of New York at Albany and a Ph.D. from the School of Criminology at Florida State University.

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MULCAHY, TIMOTHY M., Senior Research Scientist with the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) at the University of Chicago, has more than 15 years' experience in substance abuse and criminal justice research. Mr. Mulcahy currently is the Co-Principal Investigator of a National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)/National Institute of Justice (NIJ) Joint Initiative for Research on Retail Drug Markets. This project seeks to integrate epidemiology with behavioral and economic studies of the composition and dynamics of drug markets, including drug manufacture, sale, and use. Previously Mr. Mulcahy served as Project Director for two congressionally mandated studies sponsored by the National Institute of Justice - one that examined the issue of domestic human trafficking and the other an examination of the federal death penalty system.

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MUMOLA, CHRISTOPHER J. has worked with the Corrections Statistics Unit of the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) since 1996. Since 2000, he has been responsible for developing a series of BJS data collections pursuant to the Deaths in Custody Reporting Act. From that series, Mr. Mumola has authored several BJS publications on mortality in the criminal justice system. Currently, Mr. Mumola is also managing the Former Prisoner Survey, BJS's first national survey of offenders under parole supervision. In the past, Mr. Mumola has authored BJS Special Reports on topics such as incarcerated veterans and incarcerated parents, as well as three previous studies on the substance abuse and treatment histories of criminal offenders. Mr. Mumola serves as a liaison to the Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) on drug policy data matters, and has also overseen BJS's data collections on special correctional populations, such as military correctional facilities, U.S. territorial prisons, and persons under Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) detention. Mr. Mumola received his Master of Public Administration (M.P.A.) degree from American University, and his Bachelor of Arts degree in history from the University of Pittsburgh.

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MYRENT, MARK is the Illinois Statistical Analysis Center (SAC) Director and oversees 14 staff members who conduct research and evaluation on topic areas that span the criminal and juvenile justice systems. Prior to that he served as Research Director for the Cook County Juvenile Court, where he conducted studies on juvenile detention alternatives and on mental health screening of court-involved youth. Previously, he served for more than 20 years at the SAC agency as Senior Research Manager and Integrated Justice Information System (IIJIS) project manager. His extensive experience in the field of criminal justice includes having taught at the Chicago campuses of both Loyola University and the University of Illinois. Mr. Myrent also worked as a juvenile justice specialist with the Illinois Juvenile Justice Commission. He is a doctoral candidate (2009) in criminal justice at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He is the author of numerous publications on the subjects of juvenile justice trends, disproportionate minority contact, the IIJIS project, computerized access to criminal history records, victim assistance programs, jail crowding, and trends in law enforcement. He has acted as chairman of the Cook County Juvenile Detention Alternatives Initiative Research Committee, vice chairman of the Salvation Army Correctional Services Advisory Committee, and is the Authority's designee to the Redeploy Illinois Oversight Board, which oversees community-based alternatives to juvenile incarceration.

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O'CONNELL, JOHN P. "JACK" has been the Delaware Statistical Analysis Center Director since 1988. Prior to that, he was the Washington State Statistical Analysis Center Director. One of the special emphases in the Delaware Statistical Analysis Center is juvenile justice studies, which encompass juvenile crime, detention, incarceration, treatment, institution population monitoring and recidivism. The Center also maintains a detailed database that provides information regarding non-amenable juveniles that have or might have their cases indicted in Superior Court to be tried as adults. The juvenile sex offender recidivism study, which is being presented at this year's BJS/JRSA Conference, exploits the Center's juvenile justice research database which includes a 12-year history of juvenile recidivism in Delaware. This year's Delaware Juvenile Recidivism Level III, IV and V Study (2009) can be found at sac.omb.delaware.gov.

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OROS, CRISTIAN has been a Computer Information Technologist within the Statistical Analysis Center at Missouri State Highway Patrol since 2006. In his current position as a Web Developer/GIS Analyst he has developed and maintained websites such as the Missouri Sex Offender Registry, Traffic Crashes, Arrests Reports, and Missing Persons. He has developed GIS modules for the Sex Offender Registry and Traffic Crashes websites. He received a Bachelor of Business Administration degree in computer information systems from Baruch College, The City University of New York, in 2001.

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OVERTON, MICHAEL has been with the Nebraska Commission on Law Enforcement and Criminal Justice (Crime Commission) since 1986, now serving as Chief of the Information Services Division. He is involved in a variety of efforts including reporting, evaluation, and automation. As the elected chair of the Criminal Justice Information System (CJIS) Advisory Committee since 1995, he is involved in various efforts dealing with criminal justice integration. These include increasing access to existing databases through NCJIS, the state's secure data portal. Other initiatives include implementing, integrating, or enhancing systems involving state and local agencies. Local implementations include jail systems, law enforcement records, prosecution case management, and mobile reporting. As Director of the Statistical Analysis Center he has worked on various research and data collection efforts for the agency and others. He has an M.S. in mathematics from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

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PENMAN, SHELLEY is the data coordinator at the Research and Policy Analysis Division of the Office of Grants and Research, Massachusetts Executive Office of Public Safety and Security (EOPSS). Ms. Penman has been at EOPSS since 2005 and has been providing research support to the executive staff, working specifically with data management and analysis. She has authored a number of reports on topics such as sexual assault, deaths in police custody, and witness protection services in Massachusetts. Ms. Penman has an M.S. degree in criminal justice from Northeastern University, and a B.A. from Ohio University.

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PETERSON, JOSEPH L. is presently Professor and Director of the School of Criminal Justice and Criminalistics at California State University, Los Angeles. Over the past 35 years, Dr. Peterson's research and publications have monitored the evolution of the forensic sciences, documenting its growing potential as well as its shortcomings. His research has focused on the uses and effects of scientific evidence and testimony at key decision points in the judicial process (arrest, charging, determination of guilt or innocence, and sentencing) and found that forensic evidence has a limited effect in deciding guilt or innocence, but major impact at the points of arrest and sentencing. His work has also probed the quality of crime laboratory results via proficiency testing of examiners. Dr. Peterson has examined the problems associated with the placement of crime laboratories within law enforcement agencies, including chronic resource shortages, difficulties in maintaining neutrality, and a reluctance to embrace rigorous scientific standards. His 2002 and 2005 Census(es) of Publicly Funded Forensic Crime Laboratories for the U.S. Department of Justice's Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) have documented high caseloads, long backlogs, and severe budgetary and personnel needs. He is presently (2006) funded by the National Institute of Justice to study the role and impact of forensic science in the criminal justice process. Dr. Peterson received the Distinguished Fellow Award from the American Academy of Forensic Sciences in 2008.

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POULIN, MARY is a Senior Research Associate at the Justice Research and Statistics Association (JRSA) in Washington, DC. Among other efforts, she currently manages two Department of Justice-funded projects at JRSA: Evaluation of Utah's Youth and Families with Promise Program and the Bureau of Justice Assistance Center for Program Evaluation and Performance Measurement. In addition, she is working on an Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP)-funded project that involves evaluating disproportionate minority contact initiatives. Dr. Poulin has 15 years of experience in the evaluation of justice programs and has provided evaluation-related training and technical assistance to justice system practitioners for several years. Previous projects have included conducting evaluations of juvenile justice programs funded by the City of Philadelphia and managing the Juvenile Justice Evaluation Center funded by OJJDP. She received her Ph.D. in criminal justice from Temple University.

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POWERS, MARK is a Research Analyst at the Illinois Criminal Justice Information Authority. He holds a master's degree in criminology from the University of South Florida. His prior research and evaluation areas include corrections and drug treatment in correctional settings, victimization, and prostitution. He is currently at work on an evaluation of a state-sponsored youth violence prevention initiative involving community coalitions as well as the design of an interactive mapping and data website for crime in Illinois.

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PRINS, CRAIG has served as Executive Director of the Oregon Criminal Justice Commission since December 2004. His experience in criminal justice includes serving as a Deputy District Attorney in Portland, Oregon, from 1997-2003. He was introduced to criminal justice policy work when he served as counsel for Oregon's house and senate judiciary committees in during Oregon's 2001 and 2003 legislative sessions. Mr. Prin graduated from the University of Notre Dame Law School.

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PRZYBYLSKI, ROGER is a consultant and founder of RKC Group, a private consulting company that provides applied research and evaluation services to public and private sector organizations. Prior to forming RKC Group in 1997, Mr. Przybylski served as associate director for the Illinois Criminal Justice Information Authority, where he directed the authority's research division. He also has served as coordinator of research for the Chicago Police Department. Mr. Przybylski is a past president of JRSA and current chairman of the American Evaluation Association's crime and justice interest group. He has been an adjunct faculty member at Loyola University and the University of Illinois-Chicago. He also has served as staff to the Illinois Legislative Committee on Juvenile Justice, the Governor's Commission on Gangs in Illinois, and the Illinois Task Force on Crime and Corrections. Mr. Przybylski conducts training on evaluation, cost-benefit analysis and evidence-based programming across the country. He recently authored the publication, "What Works: Effective Recidivism Reduction and Risk-Focused Prevention Programs - A Compendium of Evidence-Based Options for Preventing New and Persistent Criminal Behavior." His recent consulting work includes projects for the Alaska Department of Corrections, the Erie County (New York) Probation Department, the Colorado Criminal Justice Reform Coalition, and the Rutherford County (Tennessee) Drug Court.

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PRICE, JAMIE is President of Socialphenom Inc., a research institute that focuses on social problems, crime, and research methodologies. He also teaches in the criminal justice programs at Florida Atlantic University, Kaplan University, University of Phoenix, and Arapahoe Community College. His areas of interests are: research methods, statistics, crime mapping, criminology, problem solving and policing. He serves as a reviewer for Crime Mapping: A Journal of Research and Practice.

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PRICE, SPENCER is a Research Analyst with the Delaware Statistical Analysis Center, where he has worked for the past nine years focusing primarily on Superior Court sentencing policies, procedures, and practices. He has conducted studies involving Superior Court drug case sentencing, sentencing guidelines for Delaware, and Delaware's adult boot camp. In addition, Mr. Price acts as the main research resource for Delaware's Sentencing Research and Evaluation Committee as well as Delaware's Sentencing Accountability Commission.

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RAND, MICHAEL R. is Chief of Victimization Statistics at the U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS), where he oversees the collection of data related to crime and victimization, including the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS), one of the two leading crime indicators in the United States. Mr. Rand began his career at the Census Bureau in 1972 and has been at the BJS since 1978. He has directed the Victimization Statistics Branch at BJS since 1995, and is now taking the lead in a reevaluation and redesign of the survey's methodology to ensure that it will meet future needs for information on crime and victims. Mr. Rand is the author or co-author of several published articles and BJS reports on the extent and nature of crime victimization and crime's impact on victims. Most recently he coauthored a report on victimization of people with disabilities. He has also provided technical assistance in the area of victimization statistics to the United Nations and nations developing criminal justice statistical programs.

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REAVES, BRIAN A. has been a Statistician with the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) since 1988. While at BJS, he has developed and managed several recurring national data collections, including the Law Enforcement Management and Administrative Statistics (LEMAS) survey, the Census of State and Local Law Enforcement Agencies, the Census of Federal Law Enforcement Officers, the Census of Law Enforcement Training Academies, and the Survey of Campus Law Enforcement Agencies. He has authored numerous BJS publications associated with these data collections. He has also published articles in scholarly journals such as Criminal Justice Policy Review, Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies and Management, and the Journal of Security Administration. Dr. Reaves earned his Ph.D. in applied social psychology from the University of Florida, and his B.A. in psychology from the University of Missouri.

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RENGIFO, ANDRES F. is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice at the University of Missouri St. Louis (USML). He received his Ph.D. from The City University of New York, John Jay College in 2007. Prior to joining USML, he was a Senior Research Associate at the Vera Institute of Justice. His research focuses on the intersection between sentencing and corrections policies and incarceration. His current work involves the study of organizational change in the Department of Corrections in two midwestern states. Dr. Rengifo is also interested in social networks, urban crime, and disorder.

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RENNA, CHRIS is a Computer Information Technologist/GIS analyst with the Statistical Analysis Center of Missouri. He applies his skills as a GIS analyst to map historical and current crime trends found in Missouri. He assists many of the online mapping applications by creating base layers and improving the geocoding for the sex offender registry. Mr. Renna received a Bachelor of Arts degree in geography from the University of Missouri and a certificate in geographic information science.

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ROEHL, JAN has conducted justice-related research for over 30 years, studying partnerships, community policing, drug courts, crime prevention, domestic violence, and dispute resolution. She was Vice President of the Institute for Social Analysis for 20 years, and founded the Justice Research Center (JRC) in 1996. Dr. Roehl is currently a senior member of the evaluation team conducting the third national evaluation of the Weed and Seed Program funded by the Department of Justice, and provides consulting services in program evaluation and grant writing to nonprofits and local units of government. She received her Ph.D. in social psychology at George Washington University in Washington, D.C.

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ROSENFELD, RICHARD is Curators Professor of Criminology and Criminal Justice at the University of Missouri-St. Louis. He has written widely on the social sources of crime, trends in crime, crime statistics, and criminal justice policy. His current research focuses on the impact of economic conditions on crime rates. Professor Rosenfeld served on the National Academy of Science's Committee on Law and Justice (2002-08) and was a member of the steering committee of the National Science Foundation's National Consortium on Violence Research (1996-2008). He is a Fellow and incoming President of the American Society of Criminology.

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RUBIN, MARK is a Research Associate with the Justice Policy Program at the Muskie School of Public Service. Among his current work is supervising Maine's involvement in the JRSA Parole Revocation Study and conducting a case study for the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) measuring the diffusion of evidence-based practices in probation and post-supervision in Maine. Prior to working in Maine, Mr. Rubin served as Director of Research and Neighborhood Information Services at DC Agenda, a nonprofit intermediary in Washington, DC. He was also previously a Research Associate at the Urban Institute in the Metropolitan Housing and Community Development Center, where his research focused on economic development and housing challenges for low-income residents. Mr. Rubin received a bachelor's degree in international relations from Johns Hopkins University and a master's in urban planning from Columbia University.

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SINCLAIR, MICHAEL is Acting Director and Deputy Director of Statistical Collections and Analysis at the Bureau of Justice Statistics. He earned his Ph.D. in statistics from the George Washington University in Washington, D.C. in 1994, specializing in large scale survey design and assessment, and received a master's degree in mathematical statistics from Oklahoma State University in 1986. He has more than 21 years of experience in the design, evaluation, and analysis of complex survey data collections. Prior to joining BJS, Dr. Sinclair served as the Director of Statistical Analysis at the Department of Labor in the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP) and was responsible for leading a group of senior statisticians and compliance officers in developing a new array of statistical programs and operational methods to enhance and evaluate the effectiveness of the OFCCP data collection and Federal Contractor Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) auditing programs. Dr. Sinclair also developed a new set of agency standards for conducting audits of employee compensation to ensure employer pay practices were administered neutrally with regard to the influence of the employee's race, gender, and ethnicity. Prior to his career at DOL, Dr. Sinclair served as a senior statistician at Mathematica Policy Research, Inc. in Princeton, New Jersey, designing and analyzing surveys for several federal, state, and academic organizations. He directed expert panels to design survey procedures for rare populations, including the development of a survey for home health aides, and managed data collection officials to conduct observational studies, including a transit flow study for the New Jersey Transit Authority. Dr. Sinclair also spent six years at the U.S. Census Bureau as a Supervisory Mathematical Statistician working on a variety of Decennial data quality assessment programs, and developed new procedures for conducting and evaluating content re-interview surveys. At the Census Bureau he also worked to increase the Decennial Census mail-back response rates by evaluating the effects of various user-friendly design formats and incentives. Dr. Sinclair has presented at the International Conference on Forensic Statistics in Edinburgh, Scotland, to demonstrate how to apply various survey analysis methods to the assessment of the classic Kalven and Zeisel judge-jury agreement study and related applications. He has recently published articles in the Journal of the American Statistical Association, Law Probability and Risk, Jurimetrics, Survey Methodology, and Public Opinion Quarterly.

SNYDER, HOWARD N. is the Chief of the new Recidivism, Reentry and Special Projects Unit at the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS). At BJS Dr. Snyder is responsible for implementing a national program of recidivism research. This work is creating a new protocol for mining data housed in criminal history repositories. The Unit is also responsible for analyzing data flowing from the FBI's Uniform Crime Reporting Program. Prior to joining BJS, he served as Director of Systems Research at National Center for Juvenile Justice from 1981 until his resignation in 2008. He founded the National Juvenile Court Data Archive and has served as its Director for over 25 years. In 1989 he began an effort that functioned for nearly 20 years as the nation's statistical analysis center on juvenile crime and justice topics. He was honored in 1998 by the U.S. Department of Justice with its Award for Achievement for Service to Families and Children and in 2004 by the American Correctional Association with its Peter P. Lejins Research Award for his lifetime contribution to research. He has served as the Chair of the American Correctional Association's Research Council and the American Statistical Association's Committee on Law and Justice Statistics.

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STEVENSON, PHILLIP is the Director of the Arizona Statistical Analysis Center (AZSAC). The AZSAC serves as the research arm of the Arizona Criminal Justice Commission and contributes to statewide policy development and practice by providing statistical research and analyses of Arizona's criminal and juvenile justice systems. Mr. Stevenson is also Chair of the Arizona Substance Abuse Partnership's Epidemiology Work Group and is a member of the Arizona Juvenile Justice Commission's Disproportionate Minority Contact Subcommittee. He also serves as Vice Chair of the Global Justice Information Sharing Initiative Privacy and Information Quality Working Group, which is a subcommittee of the Federal Advisory Committee that advises the Attorney General of the United States on justice information sharing and integration initiatives, and is a member of the National Institute of Justice Community Corrections Research Network. Mr. Stevenson is Secretary/Treasurer of the Justice Research and Statistics Association and Chair of the association's Training, Technical Assistance, and Technology Committee. He is also Adjunct Faculty with Arizona State University's School of Criminology and Criminal Justice, where he teaches crime and delinquency prevention and community relations and the justice system.

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STEYEE, JIMMY is the Montana Statistical Analysis Center Director, a position he has held since 2008. He also is a member of Montana's Epidemiological Workgroup. The SAC is the designated agency to collect Uniform Crime Reporting/National Incident-Based Reporting System crime data for Montana. Prior to joining the Montana SAC, Mr. Steyee conducted market research on energy-related companies. Mr. Steyee received his B.S. in sociology/law and society from Montana State University and is working on his master's at the University of California, Irvine.

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TRUDEAU, JAMES directs the cross-site evaluation of the National Weed and Seed Strategy. He draws upon experience evaluating other complex initiatives, including the Community Partnership Program funded by the Center for Substance Abuse Prevention; the Safe Schools/Healthy Students Initiative funded by the U.S. Departments of Education, Justice, and Health and Human Services; and the Serious Violent Offender Reentry Initiative funded by the U.S. Department of Justice. Dr. Trudeau directs the Crime, Violence, and Justice Research Program at RTI International in North Carolina. He received his doctorate in social psychology (research methodology minor) from the University of Florida in 1988.

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VANDERCOOK, JACKIE is the Statistics Assistant Director with the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation. She serves as the manager of Tennessee's state National Incident Based Reporting System (NIBRS) program and as the Director of the state's Statistical Analysis Center for criminal justice. She has worked at TBI since 1991 when she started the Statistical Analysis Center. The SAC began implementation of the state NIBRS program in 1996, and achieved NIBRS certification with the FBI in 1998 and 100% statewide reporting in 2000. She is a past president of the national Association of State Uniform Crime Reporting Programs and is the current vice president of the Justice Research and Statistics Association, a national organization of state Statistical Analysis Centers. She worked for six years at the state Department of Correction in the planning and research section prior to coming to TBI. Ms. Vandercook earned a bachelor's and a master's degree from the University of Tennessee.

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WAMBEAM, RODNEY is Manager of the Center for Justice Research and a Senior Research Scientist at the Wyoming Survey & Analysis Center (WYSAC) of the University of Wyoming (UW). He is also an adjunct professor in the Department of Political Science at UW. Dr. Wambeam completed his Ph.D. at the University of Nebraska - Lincoln in 1999 and served as policy advisor to Nebraska Governor Ben Nelson. He was Director of the Evaluation Research Department at the Nebraska Council to Prevent Alcohol and Drug Abuse before moving home to Wyoming in 2002. At WYSAC, Dr. Wambeam oversees numerous criminal justice and substance abuse prevention research projects. He was principal investigator of Wyoming's 21st Century State Incentive Grant evaluation and is currently principal investigator of Wyoming's Federal Prevention Block Grant and Strategic Prevention Framework State Incentive Grant evaluations. He facilitates the State Epidemiological Workgroup for Substance Abuse Prevention and is a member of Wyoming's State Advisory Council for Substance Abuse Prevention. In his free time he is an avid trail runner, and is the founder and coach of Wyoming's only short track ice speed skating team. He has been known to organize Muggle Quidditch games for youth, and recently completed his first triathlon.

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WILSON, MIKE is an economist for the Oregon Criminal Justice Commission and the state's Statistical Analysis Center Director. Mr. Wilson received his bachelor's and master's degrees in economics from the University of California at San Diego, where he also worked as a research analyst. He was also an adjunct faculty member at Point Loma Nazarene University. Before being named SAC Director, he was an economist for the Oregon Employment Department.

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WING, JANEENA J. is the Director of the Statistical Analysis Center in Idaho, housed within the Idaho State Police. Her most recent research includes a police allocation model for the state police, evaluations of STOP (Services, Training, Officers, and Prosecutors)- and Byrne/Justice Assistance Grant (JAG)-funded programs, examining drug and alcohol arrests in Idaho using National Incident-Based Reporting System police reports, and a statewide victimization survey. Ms. Wing received her M.A. in sociology from Idaho State University.

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WRIGHT, DAVID serves as the Evaluation Projects Manager in Decision Support Services for the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services. The responsibilities of this position involve performing research, statistical analysis, and evaluation supporting the Mental Health Transformation State Incentive Grant, the Co-Occurring State Incentive Grant, Adult and Juvenile Drug Courts, DUI Courts, Mental Health Courts, and Jail Diversion Programs. Prior to this position, Dr. Wright served as the Director of the Oklahoma Statistical Analysis Center and Director of Research at the Oklahoma Criminal Justice Resource Center. He has received numerous awards and honors for his research publications. Dr. Wright received his Ph.D. in political science from the University of Houston, after receiving his master's degree at Oklahoma State University and his bachelor's degree at Southwestern Oklahoma State University.

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