BJS/JRSA 2008 National Conference - October 16-17, 20087 in Portland, Oregon
Agenda
Pre- and Postconference Seminars
Hotel and Travel Information
Speaker Biographies
Session Abstracts
  Pre- and Postconference Seminars

1. Crime Mapping and Analysis Using GIS
Tuesday, October 14, 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Seminar Description: This course introduces the concept of crime mapping, demonstrates the relationship between crime mapping and crime analysis, and presents many of the technical issues that are encountered when implementing a crime mapping effort. The presentation is divided into three components. The first component describes the nature and scope of crime analysis. The second component focuses on how crime analysis can be utilized in an effort to enhance public safety. The third component consists of hands-on lessons that walk participants through a typical series of tasks for crime analysts. A "watch and follow" methodology is employed: After watching instructors demonstrate a technique, participants will follow along with the instructors and perform structured lessons. These lessons illustrate the use of ArcGIS and Microsoft Office software to collect, store, retrieve, manipulate, analyze, and display social and crime data.

Instructor:
Jamie Price, President
Socialphenom, Inc.
West Palm Beach, Florida



2. Examining Questions and Controversies Regarding the Use of Evidence-Based Programs and Practices
Tuesday, October 14, 8:00 a.m. - 12:00 noon

Seminar Description: Though researchers have produced a lot of information about what works in criminal justice, questions and controversies persist about the use of evidence-based programs and practices. This seminar will explore some of these questions and controversies in an attempt to address how to overcome them. Some of the issues to be addressed include: how to support innovation and evidence-based programs, implementation of evidence-based programs under different circumstances and in different settings, and whether and how criminal justice can learn from evidence-based controversies and resolutions in fields outside of criminal justice. This seminar will include a guided, interactive discussion among participants. Participants are expected to read materials provided in advance in order to contribute to the discussion.

Instructors:
Stan Orchowsky, Ph.D.
Justice Research and Statistics Association
Washington, DC

Mary Poulin, Ph.D.
Justice Research and Statistics Association
Washington, DC



3. Cost-Benefit Analysis
REGISTRATION CLOSED
Tuesday, October 14, 1:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Seminar Description: Policy makers often decide where to invest limited tax revenues with no way of estimating the expected return on that investment. Cost-benefit analysis allows analysts to provide policy makers with estimates on the benefits of investing in a given program. This seminar will provide a step-by-step description of the methodology used to create a cost-benefit model for programs designed to reduce crime. We will discuss how to estimate taxpayer and victimization costs of crime. We will also discuss using an effect size of a program to determine the estimated number of crimes avoided and the estimated benefit of avoiding those crimes. This seminar is designed to be very practical, giving analysts the resources to develop a cost-benefit model in their state.

Instructor:
Mike Wilson
Director, Statistical Analysis Center
Oregon Criminal Justice Commission



4. Basic Evaluation Concepts and Methods
Wednesday, October 15, 8:00 a.m. - 12:00 noon

Seminar Description: This workshop is designed to provide participants with a basic yet comprehensive overview of program evaluation essentials. Participants will learn the critical concepts, key terms, and primary methods used in the evaluation of criminal justice programs. Basic evaluation theory and principles, logic models, performance measurement, process evaluation, and outcome evaluation will be covered. Key considerations in managing an evaluation project and working with an evaluator also will be discussed.

Instructor:
Roger Przybylski
RKC Group
Lakewood, Colorado



5. Forecasting Prison Populations
Wednesday, October 15, 8:00 a.m. - 12:00 noon

Seminar Description: Participants in this seminar will learn how to produce prison population projections using a disaggregated, microsimulation flow model. The first hour will focus on projecting intakes into the system. Participants will learn how to calculate conviction and incarceration probabilities. The remaining time will focus on projecting the prison population. This process is divided into two modules: (1) projecting from intakes; and (2) projecting the remaining population from the stock (the population in prison at the time the projection begins). Participants will learn how to analyze prison releases to calculate survival probabilities used to release offenders from prison. They will also analyze the stock population to determine how long offenders who are in prison when the projection starts will have to serve prior to their release. Participants should be familiar with Excel, the software that will be used to demonstrate the process.

Instructor:
Pablo Martinez, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Texas State University - San Marcos



6. Forecasting Policy Simulation
Wednesday, October 15, 1:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Seminar Description: What happens when laws are passed that impact the justice system? What are the costs of the proposed laws? What populations will be affected? How many years will it take for the system to return to equilibrium? Criminal justice practitioners often find themselves answering questions like these, especially during a legislative session. Additionally, agency directors must consider similar questions when they are planning to change policies that may affect the length of offenders' stays in a particular program. This seminar focuses on the methodology used to go about answering such questions. The instructor will bring a series of situations (policy options) and exercises that will be conducted in class. It is recommended that participants have a laptop with Excel and come prepared with policy impact questions for class consideration.

Instructor:
Pablo Martinez, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Texas State University - San Marcos



7. Data Shared Is Data Improved: Building Better Websites
Saturday, October 18, 8:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.

Seminar Description: The Statistical Analysis Centers produce an incredible amount of data and publications that are useful to local, state, and national criminal justice agencies, policy makers, researchers, academicians, the media, and many others. Making data and publications available via the Internet is one way to provide access to the wealth of information housed in the SACs. This workshop will focus on designing websites, with an emphasis on the content and considerations necessary for a user-friendly, informative, and dynamic presence on the Internet.

Instructor:
Cindy Durrett
Statistical Analysis Center
Florida Department of Law Enforcement



8. Contemporary Issues in Evaluation: Focus on What Works and How We Know
CANCELLED

Saturday, October 18, 8:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Seminar Description: What works to reduce recidivism? What works to prevent delinquency? How can we best provide decision makers with trustworthy evidence about what works? This workshop is designed to help participants answer these questions by exploring both current knowledge about effective programs and the key methodological issues that arise in determining what works. Participants will learn about the evolution of the evidence-based movement; the latest thinking on what constitutes credible evidence; the roles that systematic reviews, meta-analysis and cost-benefit analysis play in the evidentiary process; and the nuances of navigating, interpreting, and applying "what works" research. Participants also will explore the latest evidence on the crime prevention effects of incarceration, correctional interventions, and early, risk-focused prevention programs.

Instructor:
Roger Przybylski
RKC Group
Lakewood, Colorado



9. Moving Practitioners Beyond Descriptive Statistics
Saturday, October 18, 8:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Seminar Description: Statistical analysis is very important with regard to reports, projects, policy, and the general understanding of information processed on a daily basis. Many people are intimidated by mathematics and statistics, which causes an overreliance on simple descriptive statistics such as means, standard deviations, rates, and percent changes. These simple descriptive statistics all have limitations, however. The primary goal of this presentation is to identify the limitations of descriptive statistics and explore more meaningful bivariate and multivariate analyses, such as z-scores, t-tests, ANOVA, and regression.

Instructor:
Jamie Price, President
Socialphenom, Inc.
West Palm Beach, Florida