BJS/JRSA 2008 National Conference - October 16-17, 2008 in Portland, Oregon
Agenda
Pre- and Postconference Seminars
Hotel and Travel Information
Speaker Biographies
Session Abstracts
  Speaker Biographies



Adams, Sharyn is a Research Analyst with the Illinois Criminal Justice Information Authority, where she has worked for the past 10 years. Her primary areas of interest are evidence-based practices in probation, the growing problem of methamphetamine, and human trafficking. Her prior areas of research include criminal history records, gangs, and juveniles. She has a B.A. from the University of Illinois - Champaign and is currently finishing her M.A. from DePaul University.

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Albright, Danielle is a Research Assistant at the New Mexico Statistical Analysis Center at the University of New Mexico. She received an M.A. in sociology from the University of Louisville in 2003 and is currently a doctoral candidate in sociology at UNM. Her research interests include public policy, domestic violence, and community organizing.

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Arrigona, Nancy is Director of Research with the Texas Juvenile Probation Commission (JPC). She is responsible for conducting juvenile justice program evaluations, policy impact analysis, cost-effectiveness studies, performance measure development, risk assessment development, and statistical modeling and analysis. Prior to her employment with JPC, Ms. Arrigona was the Director of Research for the Texas Criminal Justice Policy Council. She has developed, designed, and directed evaluations of pilot and existing programs in corrections, juvenile justice, prevention, human services, mental health, and education. She acts as an advisor on the development of evaluation designs and the implementation of research efforts, and serves as a member of numerous advisory boards and task force efforts. Ms. Arrigona holds a bachelor of arts in government from the University of Texas at Austin and a master of public affairs from the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs at the same institution.

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Bales, William D.&Nbsp;is an Associate Professor in the College of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Florida State University. His interests include sentencing research, assessing the effectiveness and consequences of punishment and correctional strategies, and community reentry issues among incarcerated adult and juvenile populations. Prior to joining the faculty at Florida State in 2003, he was the Director of Research with the Florida Department of Corrections since 1991. He has also worked in various research capacities with the Florida Supreme Court and the Florida Department of Law Enforcement. He has published his research in various academic journals and government publications, and presented research findings at numerous corrections, criminal justice, and statistics conferences over the past 25 years.

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Barrick, Kelle is a Research Analyst in RTI International's Crime, Violence, and Justice Research Program. Prior to joining RTI in 2008, she served on the faculty of Florida State University as an Assistant in Research in the College of Criminology and Criminal Justice and continues to serve part time in that capacity. She received her Ph.D. in criminology in 2007 from Florida State University.

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Beck, Allen J. is the Senior Statistical Advisor at the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS). He earned his Ph.D. in sociology with a specialty in population studies and survey methods at the University of Michigan. Dr. Beck is responsible for advising staff on all of BJS's statistical collections and analyses. In addition, he is responsible for implementation of the Prison Rape Elimination Act. Dr. Beck joined BJS in 1984 as a Statistician in the Corrections Statistics Unit. In 1990 he became the Chief of the Corrections Unit. Past work has included national studies of recidivism, estimation of the lifetime chances of going to state or federal prison, analyses of trends in U.S. probation and parole populations, research related to rising incarceration rates, and studies of prisoner reentry. As a BJS Statistician, Chief of the Corrections Unit, Principal Deputy Director, and Senior Statistical Advisor, he has had extensive experience with all aspects of BJS's statistical operations. In addition to authoring or coauthoring more than 25 BJS bulletins and special reports since 2000, he has published widely in the area of corrections. He serves on the Criminal Justice Program Advisory Board at the University of Maryland, University College. In 2008 he received the Peter P. Lejins Research Award from the American Correctional Association.

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Bellatty, Paul has a master's degree and a doctorate in quantitative genetics from Oregon State University. He has been a Biostatistician at the Environmental Protection Agency's Environmental Laboratory, a Research Analyst for Oregon's child welfare agency, a Research Associate for the Child Welfare Partnership at Portland State University, and is currently Manager of the Research and Evaluation Unit at Oregon's Department of Corrections. Research projects at the Oregon Department of Corrections include the following: developing risk assessment tools, developing program evaluation methodologies, quantifying program effectiveness, identifying vulnerable inmate populations, and developing a data warehouse.

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Bileski, Matthew T. is a Research Analyst for the Statistical Analysis Center at the Arizona Criminal Justice Commission. Aside from his work in the Arizona Homicide Study, his experience includes research in the improvement of criminal history records within the state of Arizona as well as involvement in violent injury prevention through the Arizona Injury Prevention Advisory Council. Mr. Bileski received his M.A. in criminology and criminal justice at the University of Missouri-St. Louis and his B.A. in psychology and a B.A. in sociology at the University of Missouri-Columbia.

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Block, Carolyn Rebecca is Senior Research Analyst at the Illinois Criminal Justice Information Authority, where she advises policy makers, researchers, and the public on the use and interpretation of data, especially measurement issues and violence prevention. A founder of the Homicide Research Working Group, she is principal investigator of the Chicago Women's Health Risk Study (CWHRS), a large longitudinal study of lethal and non-lethal intimate partner violence. Working closely with the Chicago Police Department, she has collected and maintained the Chicago Homicide Dataset (CHD) since 1965. Her current research focuses on collaborative analyses of the CHD and the CWHRS.

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Brazzell, Diana is a Research Associate in the Justice Policy Center at the Urban Institute. Ms. Brazzell is involved in several research projects on topics including prisoner reentry, local jails, faith-based programming, and justice mapping. She graduated from Brown University with a bachelor's degree in public policy.

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Broidy, Lisa is an Associate Professor of sociology at the University of New Mexico and is also the Director of the New Mexico Statistical Analysis Center and the university's Institute for Social Research. Her primary research interests are female offending and gender differences in the causes and nature of offending, and violent offending and victimization.

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Burton, Sue has been the Director of Florida's Statistical Analysis Center (FSAC) at the Florida Department of Law Enforcement since 1995, and she is the current President of the Justice Research and Statistics Association (JRSA). She has over 25 years' experience in the private and public sector in the areas of information systems and criminal justice research. The FSAC, under Ms. Burton's direction, acquires, documents, analyzes and explains criminal justice data (criminal histories, Uniform Crime Reports, corrections, officer employment) for policy and operational purposes. She has experience in the private and public sector in the areas of information systems and criminal justice research. Her research experience and development work with the Florida Supreme Court and the Florida Department of Law Enforcement has involved sentencing guidelines, jury management systems, plea bargaining, information resource technology planning, system design, the criminal justice workforce, grant writing, and data analysis.

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Cohen, Thomas H. has been a Statistician with the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) since 2003. His primary work focuses on courts, trials, juries, and case processing in both the civil and criminal fields. Dr. Cohen has written several BJS reports examining all phases of felony case processing from arrest through adjudication and sentencing. In addition, he has authored several BJS reports examining pretrial release decision-making and the frequency with which defendants released on pretrial fail to make court appearances or are rearrested for new crimes. Dr. Cohen also works extensively on the civil side of state court systems. His writing in this area includes an analysis of tort, contract, and real property trial and appellate litigation in state courts. Prior to joining BJS, Dr. Cohen held research positions at the Pretrial Justice Institute and the National Center for State Courts. Dr. Cohen received a Ph.D. from the Rutgers School of Criminal Justice and a law degree from the University of Maryland Law School.

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Cox, Philip is an Assistant Director of the Program Office at the Oregon Youth Authority (OYA), the agency responsible for state-level juvenile justice programs for youth committed to state custody. The agency provides reformation services to approximately 2,000 youth offenders on a given day, with 925 in close custody facilities, 600 in community residential and foster care settings, and 425 under community supervision at home or living independently. The Program Office oversees correctional and behavioral health treatment services to OYA youth. The office is also responsible for agency training, quality assurance and improvement, policy development, and residential treatment and foster care services.

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Crandall, Cameron is an Associate Professor and Vice Chair for Research in the Department of Emergency Medicine at the University of New Mexico. He received his M.D. from The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in 1993. He completed his residency in emergency medicine at the University of New Mexico in 1996. He has been a member of the faculty in the School of Medicine since 1996. Dr. Crandall's research interests are in the area of injury epidemiology and violence epidemiology in particular. He recently completed a National Institute of Justice-funded project that evaluated the efficacy of a sexual assault nurse examiner (SANE) unit on health care and criminal justice outcomes. He is currently involved in several projects related to domestic violence and sexual assault, including a Department of Justice-funded project designed to enhance the enforcement of orders of protection in New Mexico. In addition to his research and clinical activities, Dr. Crandall serves as the chair of the New Mexico Crime Victims Reparations Commission and is a member of the Governor's Domestic Violence Leadership Commission.

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Decker, Scott H. is Professor and Director in the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Arizona State University. He received a B.A. in social justice from DePauw University, and an M.A. and Ph.D. in criminology from Florida State University. His main research interests are in the areas of gangs, criminal justice policy, and the offender's perspective.

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Dorsey, Carmen is Director of the Maine Statistical Analysis Center at the Maine Justice Policy Center, where she leads collaborative research and capacity building initiatives with the state Departments of Public Safety, Corrections, and the Judicial Branch, as well as nonprofits working to improve outcomes for juvenile and adult offenders in Maine's communities.

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Durrett, Cindy is a Government Analyst in the Florida Statistical Analysis Center (FSAC) at the Florida Department of Law Enforcement. She has 17 years of experience in the criminal justice field with over 9 years in the FSAC. Among her many duties is the responsibility for maintaining and updating the FSAC's website. Ms. Durrett received her bachelor's degree in criminology and her master's degree in public administration from Florida State University.

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English, Kim is the Director of Research for the Colorado Division of Criminal Justice. As Director, she manages a staff of professional researchers engaged in a variety of criminal and juvenile justice research and policy analysis activities including program evaluations, correctional population forecasting, and actuarial risk scale development and implementation. These activities involve working with many stakeholder groups, including the parole board and supervising officers. In 1999, Ms. English received the G. Paul Sylvestre Award for outstanding achievement in advancing criminal justice statistics in the states. She has consulted with the Council of State Governments, the National Governor's Association, the National Association of State Legislatures, the National Institute of Corrections, the Center for Sex Offender Management, the American Probation and Parole Association, and criminal justice agencies in states across the country. Ms. English recently coauthored chapters in The Sexual Predator, Vol. III: Law and Public Policy (edited by Schlank), Sexually Coercive Behavior: Understanding and Management (edited by Prentky, Janus, and Seto) and Sexually Violent Offenders: Law and Policy in North America (edited by Winick and Lafond).

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Feyerherm, William is Vice Provost for Research and Dean of Graduate Studies at Portland State University and directs the Office of Graduate Studies and the Office of Research and Sponsored Projects. The Graduate Office has oversight on over 50 master and Ph.D. programs with over 5,000 graduate students. The Office of Research and Sponsored Projects provides oversight, regulatory assistance, and support for all funded research within PSU. Dr. Feyerherm has published extensively on topics such as race and its impact on processing in the justice system. His recent research is in the areas of detention reform and overrepresentation of minorities in juvenile justice. He currently serves as a member of the Oregon Law Enforcement Contacts Policy and State Review Committee and is a consultant to the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention on disproportionate minority contact issues. In 2002, Dr. Feyerherm received the W.E.B. DuBois Award from the Western Society of Criminology for his contributions to racial and ethnic issues in criminology.

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Frandsen, Ronald J. received a B.S. in business administration and an M.A. in urban affairs from St. Louis University, and a J.D. from Wayne State University. His professional experience includes employment as a research attorney for the Michigan Court of Appeals and as a contract attorney with the Michigan State Appellate Defender Office. Mr. Frandsen is currently employed as a Grants Administrator at the Regional Justice Information Service in St. Louis, MO, and conducts research on the impact of federal and state firearms laws. He is a coauthor of the "Survey of State Procedures Related to Firearm Sales" (six editions, 2000-2005) and the author of "Enforcement of the Brady Act, 2006" (2008).

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Gest, Ted is President of Criminal Justice Journalists, a national organization based in Washington, DC, and affiliated with the Jerry Lee Center of Criminology of the University of Pennsylvania and the Center on Media, Crime and Justice at John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York City. The group publishes a daily news digest, Crime & Justice News, at http://cjj.mn-8.net. Mr. Gest is a former reporter and editor at the St. Louis Post-Dispatch and U.S. News & World Report, where he covered the White House, the Justice Department, the Supreme Court, and criminal justice issues nationally. He is a graduate of Oberlin College and the Graduate School of Journalism at Columbia University. His book, Crime & Politics, was published in 2001 by Oxford University Press.

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Glass, Barbara has been in law enforcement for more than 18 years. She worked first as a deputy sheriff and then as a sergeant for the Multnomah County Sheriff's Office from 1989 to 1994. In 1994, Officer Glass transferred to the Portland Police Bureau, where she worked as a patrol officer until 2001. In late 2000, she and her patrol district partner began to attack identity theft through in-depth investigations and search warrants. In 2001, Officer Glass became part of a two-person identity theft task force called the Special Crimes Team operating out of the Portland Police Bureau's East Precinct. In 2005, she transferred to the Portland Police Bureau's Drugs and Vice Division, where she partnered with the Drug Enforcement Administration on a drug interdiction team and conducted money laundering investigations. In 2006, Officer Glass returned to East Precinct, where she was assigned to the Neighborhood Response Team as an identity theft investigator. Officer Glass continues to investigate identity theft, money laundering, computer crimes, forgery, and other fraud-related schemes as part of a two-person team at the Portland Police Bureau's East Precinct. She has received the Sheriff's Office Citation Medal for excellence in DUII (Driving Under the Influence of Intoxicants) enforcement and high rate of conviction (99%, 1991 to 1992) and the Portland Police Bureau Achievement Medal for her work on identity theft investigations.

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Glaze, Lauren has been a Statistician with the Corrections Statistics Unit of the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) for 10 years. Her work has focused primarily on the community corrections populations and, more recently, on other special populations, such as inmates who have mental health problems and incarcerated parents. She has coauthored a couple of reports on those topics. Ms. Glaze is also serving as the project manager of BJS's large-scale national survey of jail inmates, which is conducted every six or seven years. She received her master of science degree from the Joint Program in Survey Methodology at the University of Maryland and her bachelor of arts degree in criminology and criminal justice from the University of Maryland.

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Greenspan, Owen oversees SEARCH's Law and Policy Program which helps agencies at all levels of government and courts develop and implement responsible laws, policies, and practices to govern the collection, maintenance, exchange, sharing, and dissemination of justice information. He is SEARCH's liaison with the FBI on the Interstate Identification Index and standardized criminal history record. He has served as member and staff to numerous advisory groups and national task forces. Prior to joining SEARCH, Mr. Greenspan was a Deputy Commissioner with the New York State Division of Criminal Justice Services, where he was responsible for the criminal history record repository, associated data processing services for more than 3,000 agencies, and certification of police training and accreditation programs. He is retired from the New York City Police Department, where he held patrol, investigative, administrative, and supervisory positions. His last assignment was as Commanding Officer of the Identification Section, NYPD's central criminal records unit. Mr. Greenspan holds a master of professional services (MPS) in criminal justice from C.W. Post College of Long Island University and a bachelor's degree in social science from Fordham University, New York.

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Haas, Stephen M. is Director of the West Virginia Statistical Analysis Center (SAC). Dr. Haas holds a B.A. in psychology and political science from The Ohio State University, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in criminal justice from the University of Cincinnati. He has served as Principal Investigator and Project Director on several state and federally funded research projects and evaluations. Dr. Haas has also published numerous research reports and academic papers on various topics in the field of criminology and criminal justice education. His recent work has centered on the use of core correctional practices in offender reentry, the deterrent capacity of media awareness campaigns designed to reduce gun crime, gun availability and violent crime, the statistical accuracy of crime statistics, and racial disparity in the juvenile justice system.

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Huenke, Charles has been a researcher with the Delaware Statistical Analysis Center for 14 years. During that time he has gained key insights into the policies and practices of criminal justice agencies across the spectrum. He has conducted or contributed to numerous studies on crime and arrest trends, sentencing policy, incarceration, and recidivism.

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Hunt, Dana E. is a Principal Scientist at Abt Associates, a public policy research organization in Cambridge, MA. After receiving her Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania, Dr. Hunt continued her research on illegal drugs at the National Development and Research Institutes in New York City, joining Abt in 1987. Her research has included evaluation of programs for drug users at risk of HIV, non-traditional drug treatment, community-wide enforcement initiatives and multi-site mentoring programs for youth at risk, as well as the development of models for estimating hard core drug use and drug availability. She headed the redesign and implementation of the Arrestee Drug Abuse Monitoring program in 35 sites from 1997-2001 and currently heads the ADAM II program, funded by the Office of National Drug Control Policy, in 10 sites

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Kern, Rick has been the Director of the Virginia Criminal Sentencing Commission, a judicial branch agency of the Commonwealth of Virginia, since its inception in 1994. Dr. Kern is responsible for all aspects of the Commonwealth's criminal sentencing guidelines system and reports directly to, and serves at the pleasure of, the 17-member Criminal Sentencing Commission, which, although a judicial branch agency, is composed of appointees from all three branches of state government. Dr. Kern was previously the Director of the Virginia Criminal Justice Research Center, where he was responsible for the oversight and direction of criminal justice system research requested by the governor, secretary of public safety, the legislature, and the judiciary. Dr. Kern also served as Research Director for the Governor's Commission on Parole Abolition and Sentence Reform. There, he directed research on sentencing and time served patterns, offender recidivism and risk assessment, the development of computer simulation programs to estimate the correctional resource impact of parole abolition, and the development of truth-in-sentencing voluntary guidelines. Prior to that appointment, Dr. Kern served as Director of the Governor's Commission on Violent Crime. In this capacity he directed research on crime prevention strategies, gun control measures and their effectiveness, firearms transactions, evaluation of offender rehabilitation programs, and arrest, conviction, sentencing and time served trends. Dr. Kern has twice been elected President of the Justice Research and Statistics Association (JRSA). He currently serves as an Advisory Board Member of the State Sentencing and Corrections Program operated by the Vera Institute of Justice and as the Appointed Delegate on the JRSA Executive Committee. Dr. Kern received Ph.D. and M.S. degrees in criminology from Florida State University.

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Koch, David is the Assistant Director, Multnomah County Department of Community Justice, Juvenile Services Division. His current position as Assistant Director caps his 30-year history in community corrections. While much of his career was spent within adult corrections, his current position puts him in charge of the 191-bed juvenile detention facility; probation, diversion and accountability programs; Family Court Services; Juvenile Treatment Services; and system reform efforts centered on detention reform and improving treatment outcomes for delinquent youth. Mr. Koch has managed a number of community corrections agencies in Oregon, previously served as president of the Oregon Association of Community Corrections Directors, and is the current president of the Oregon Juvenile Department Directors Association. He holds a bachelor of science degree in criminology from Southern Oregon University and is in the midst of completing a graduate degree in justice management at the University of Nevada, Reno.

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Kyckelhahn, Tracey has been a Statistician with the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) since May 2006. While at BJS she has worked on data collection for human trafficking cases, federal and state court processing statistics, and the relationship between jail characteristics and jail security. She is working on her doctorate at the University of Texas at Austin.

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Leiber, Michael is a Professor in the Wilder School of Government and Public Affairs at Virginia Commonwealth University. Previously he taught at the University of Northern Iowa for 18 years. For five years, Dr. Leiber served on the Iowa governor's juvenile justice advisory group (SAG) and was chair of the disproportionate minority contact (DMC) subcommittee. He has published articles and reports, as well as presented papers, on issues related to juvenile delinquency, juvenile justice, and race/ethnicity. He has also conducted three studies on race and juvenile justice decision making in Iowa, and published the results of one of these in a book by the State University of New York Press. He is a consultant for the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, and has provided services in over 35 states and localities, and to employees of the federal government. These services include report writing; acting as the national trainer to juvenile justice specialists, disproportionate minority contact coordinators, and state advisory councils on the disproportionate overrepresentation of minority youth in secure facilities; and evaluation of treatment programs and case management information systems. In 2008, Dr. Leiber received the W.E.B. DuBois Award for significant contributions to the field of racial and ethnic issues in criminology from the Western Society of Criminology. He received a Ph.D. in criminal justice from the State University of New York at Albany.

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Lemman, Phillip is the Deputy Director of the Oregon Youth Authority (OYA), Oregon's juvenile corrections agency. OYA has legal and/or physical custody over 2,000 youth offenders located in youth correctional facilities and community settings. Prior to joining OYA, he served as Executive Director of the Oregon Criminal Justice Commission, Oregon's Statistical Analysis Center and sentencing commission, where he coordinated state agency implementation of Oregon's evidence-based practices law.

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Lindsey, Tonya D. is a candidate for the Ph.D. at the University of California, Santa Barbara. She has published in the area of policy and media ownership using social network analysis. She is interested in how policy and its implementation shapes and is shaped by contextual factors. Her dissertation uses multiple methods and examines inmates' racialized politics and the California Department of Correction's policy of in-cell integration with an eye towards decision-making processes.

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Martinez, Pablo E. is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Criminal Justice at Texas State University-San Marcos. He has been teaching at Texas State since fall 2001. Currently he is involved in developing a risk assessment instrument for the Texas Department of Family and Protective Services to assist in evaluating child care providers in the state. He is also developing a classification system for the Texas Youth Commission (TYC) with emphasis on safety and security aspects of classification. Prior to joining Texas State, he worked for the state of Texas for 27 years. He has been involved in numerous program evaluations in Texas, including the State Jail System, Community Supervision Programs, and Intermediate Sanctions. He has conducted numerous recidivism studies of probationers and parolees. He is the author of the PABLO Scale, an instrument that he developed for the Texas Board of Pardons and Paroles to help in their parole screening process (Parole Guidelines). He also developed the JUSTICE forecasting model, which projects criminal felony populations for the state of Texas (prison, parole and probation populations) and the Texas juvenile justice forecasting model. He has done consulting work in the area of correctional forecasting, most recently for the state of Colorado.

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McManus, Rob has worked with the South Carolina Department of Public Safety's Statistical Analysis Center (SAC) since 1992 and has served as SAC Director since 1995. In that role, he has participated in research initiatives concerning domestic violence, sexual violence, and illegal drug use as well as other areas of concern. He has also served as research partner to the South Carolina District United States Attorney for Project Safe Neighborhoods. Previously, he worked in research and evaluation with the South Carolina Department of Probation and Parole for 10 years, and prior to that as a program evaluator with the Governor's Office of Criminal Justice Programs. He is currently serving as co-editor of the journal Justice Research and Policy, and has served on the Justice Research and Statistics Association's Executive Committee. He received a master's degree in criminal justice from the University of South Carolina and a bachelor's from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

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Melton, Ada Pecos, an enrolled Pueblo of Jemez citizen is President of American Indian Development Associates (AIDA), a 100% Indian woman-owned technical assistance, training, research, and evaluation firm since 1989. Ms. Melton provides services to Indian nations on research and evaluation, infrastructure, program and policy design, and development to address social justice, economic, health, and education needs, with special emphasis on the use of indigenous knowledge and culture. AIDA assists tribes with design of integrated information systems that enable tribes to share and exchange information that supports better response to tribal needs and increases cross-jurisdictional collaboration and coordination. Her public service includes work as a probation officer, court administrator, and director of justice-related programs. She has a master's of public administration degree and a bachelor of arts degree in criminal justice, both from the University of New Mexico. She is co-founder of the Tribal Juvenile Justice Council, a member of the Global Privacy & Information Quality Working Group, the New Mexico Justice Information Sharing Council, and the Justice Information Sharing Practitioner's Network and serves on several other boards and committees.

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Mena, Roland M. is currently the Executive Director of the Montana Board of Crime Control, the Governor's State Administering Agency responsible for public safety, crime prevention, victim assistance, juvenile justice, the Statistical Analysis Center, and grants management, planning and coordination. Mr. Mena has served in various capacities in Montana state government, as the past Single State Agency Director for Substance Abuse Mental Health Services Administration grants, Chairman of Montana's Co-Occurring Task Force, and Project Director for the Center of Substance Abuse Prevention State Incentive Grant. In these capacities Mr. Mena has served as the Project Director for a number of studies, including the Montana State Treatment Needs Assessment, the Montana Prevention Needs Assessment, the Montana Reservation Native American Substance Abuse Treatment Needs Assessment, and the Montana Low Income Study. Mr. Mena currently serves on the Board of the National Criminal Justice Association as Vice President.

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Meredith, Tammy is President and Co-Founder of Applied Research Services, Inc., an Atlanta-based consulting firm specializing in research, statistical analysis, and training. Dr. Meredith's current research efforts focus on identifying and managing high-risk offender populations. She is nationally recognized for developing automated risk assessment protocols and is currently directing a study funded by the National Institute of Justice to identify data-driven supervision protocols predictive of parole success. Her OPERATION ELIMI-CON secure web site with interactive mapping tools was recognized by the Attorney General as a Project Safe Neighborhoods "innovative practice" using technology to fight gun crime. Dr. Meredith received an M.A. degree from the State University of New York at Albany and a Ph.D. from the School of Criminology at Florida State University.

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Myrent, Mark is the Illinois Statistical Analysis Center (SAC) Director and oversees 14 staff members who conduct research and evaluation on topic areas that span the criminal and juvenile justice systems. Prior to that he served as Research Director for the Cook County Juvenile Court, where he conducted studies on juvenile detention alternatives and on mental health screening of court-involved youth. Previously, he served for more than 20 years at the SAC agency as Senior Research Manager and Integrated Justice Information System (IIJIS) project manager. His extensive experience in the field of criminal justice includes having taught at the Chicago campuses of both Loyola University and the University of Illinois. Mr. Myrent also worked as a juvenile justice specialist with the Illinois Juvenile Justice Commission. He is a doctoral candidate (2009) in criminal justice at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He is the author of numerous publications on the subjects of juvenile justice trends, disproportionate minority contact, the IIJIS project, computerized access to criminal history records, victim assistance programs, jail crowding, and trends in law enforcement. He has acted as chairman of the Cook County Juvenile Detention Alternatives Initiative Research Committee, vice chairman of the Salvation Army Correctional Services Advisory Committee, and is the Authority's designee to the Redeploy Illinois Oversight Board, which oversees community-based alternatives to juvenile incarceration.

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Naito, Lisa is a public safety leader at the federal, state and local levels. She chaired the National Association of Counties' Justice and Public Safety Steering Committee, championing services for mentally ill persons in jails. She served as chair of the Public Safety Committee of the Association of Oregon Counties, advocating for funding for alcohol and drug treatment, early childhood health, and for victims of domestic violence. In Multnomah County, she is chair of the Local Public Safety Coordination Council (LPSCC.) At LPSCC, public safety, health, and human services leaders meet monthly to collaborate and address core public safety issues that cross agency and jurisdictional lines. A core value of LPSCC is to collect and analyze valid and reliable data to measure progress toward articulated goals. LPSCC has sponsored annual "what works" conferences to promote evidence-based practices. Ms. Naito is a former prosecutor and state legislator.

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Neitch, Michelle is a Researcher for the Arizona Criminal Justice Commission's Statistical Analysis Center. She has conducted criminal justice research for five years, including research participation in the Arizona Arrestee Reporting Information Network project (the local version of ADAM, the Arrestee Drug Abuse Monitoring program), conducting independent research on the influence of gender as a mediator of predictors of alcohol use, and working on a wide array of research and policy projects. Ms. Neitch has been the Project Manager of the Arizona Youth Survey in 2006 and 2008. Her role as project manager includes survey design, school recruitment, administration, and data analysis. In addition to this, Ms. Neitch is a member of the Arizona Underage Drinking Committee, which is a subcommittee of the Arizona Substance Abuse Partnership. She received her B.S. and M.A. degrees from the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Arizona State University.

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Nelson, Nannette is currently an Assistant Research Scientist at the Wyoming Statistical Analysis Center (WYSAC). Currently she is Co-Principal Investigator on an EPA-funded project to estimate the public's willingness to pay for cleaner air in national parks. Ms. Nelson received M.S. degrees in 2000 from the University of Georgia (UGA) in both agricultural economics and conservation ecology. From 2001-06 she was the Staff Economist in the Institute of Ecology at UGA.

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Noonan, Margaret has been a Statistician at the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) in the U.S. Department of Justice since 2006. At BJS, Ms. Noonan researches incarcerated veterans and deaths in custody, including jails, prisons, and deaths occurring in the process of arrest. Ms. Noonan is the author of the BJS Special Report, Veterans in State and Federal Prison, 2004, published in May 2007. She is currently completing a detailed study of mortality in the nation's local jails, using several years of data collected under BJS' Deaths in Custody Reporting Program. Prior to coming to BJS, Ms. Noonan worked as a contractor for the Department of Education, where she studied delinquency and school crime. She received her M.S. and B.A. from American University.

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O'Brien, Keith manages the Research and Policy Analysis Division of the Office of Grants and Research, Massachusetts Executive Office of Public Safety and Security (EOPSS), and serves as the Director of the Massachusetts SAC. The Research and Policy Analysis Division conducts evaluations of grant-funded programs, provides analytical support on a variety of topics to the Secretary of Public Safety, and manages many public safety and criminal justice data sources in Massachusetts. Mr. O'Brien has been at EOPSS since 2005 and has focused on evaluating grant-funded programs, providing research support to the executive staff, and overseeing the research component of the Charles E. Shannon, Jr. Community Safety Initiative - a gang and youth violence prevention and intervention program. He also has authored reports on several process evaluations of EOPSS grantees. Prior to joining the EOPSS, Mr. O'Brien worked as a Program Officer at the Toshiba America Foundation, where he oversaw hundreds of grants made to schools and nonprofits and assisted in the management of the foundation. He holds a master's degree in public administration from the School of International and Public Affairs at Columbia University, a master's in education from the Graduate School of Education at Fordham University, and a bachelor of arts from Binghamton University, State University of New York.

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O'Connell, John P. has been the Director of the Delaware Statistical Analysis Center (SAC) since 1988 and prior to that was the Director of the Washington State SAC. In the juvenile justice topic area, DelSAC provides routine juvenile offender detention, incarceration, and program tracking for all institutions and out-of-state programs. It also provides an annual juvenile offender recidivism study highlighting the type of institution and/or programs the youths were placed in, and provides the policy analysis related to the Annie E. Casey Juvenile Detention Alternatives Initiative program.

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Oliver, Brian E. has a master's degree in criminology and criminal justice from the University of Missouri-St. Louis and is currently in the doctoral program there. He has published papers in the area of sexual abuse prevention, and has interests in crime trend analysis and prisoner reentry.

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Olson, David is Chairman and Associate Professor of the Criminal Justice Department at Loyola University Chicago. Previously Dr. Olson served as the Director of Loyola's interdisciplinary Forensic Science Program and as a Senior Scientist at the Illinois Criminal Justice Information Authority. He has also served as staff to the Illinois Governor's Task Force on Crime and Corrections (1992-1993), the Illinois Legislative Committee on Juvenile Justice (1994-1996), the Illinois Truth-in-Sentencing Commission (1996-1998), and the Illinois Governor's Community Safety and Prisoner Re-Entry Management Workgroup/Commission (2004-2006), and is currently on the Illinois Capital Punishment Reform Study Committee (2007-present). In addition to his ongoing work with the Illinois Department of Corrections and the Cook County Jail, he has worked with a variety of other federal, state and local agencies to develop and evaluate programs, particularly in the area of community and institutional corrections, during his 22 years in the field of criminal justice. Dr. Olson received his B.S. in criminal justice from Loyola University Chicago, his M.A. in criminal justice from the University of Illinois at Chicago, and his Ph.D. in political science/public policy analysis from the University of Illinois at Chicago, where he was the recipient of the Assistant United States Attorney General's Graduate Research Fellowship.

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Pedigo, Helen is the Executive Director of the Kansas Sentencing Commission, a body that develops and analyzes sentencing policy. The agency also administers the Alternative Sentencing Policy for Non-Violent Drug Possession Offenders (2003 - SB 123), which became operational November 1, 2003. The Commission produces annual adult prison population projections and prison custody projections. Possessing extensive journal entry of sentencing and probation revocation data bases, the agency also serves as a data resource for policy-making bodies. In addition to recommending policy that later became Senate Bill 123, the Commission recently produced a proportionality study and presently partners with other criminal justice stakeholders regarding offender reentry and criminal code recodification. Ms. Pedigo has 16 years of experience in the criminal justice field. She has served in various capacities in both adult and juvenile areas in the executive and legislative branches of Kansas government. She holds a degree from the Washburn University School of Law.

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Perrone, Paul is the Chief of Research and Statistics for the Hawaii State Department of the Attorney General, where he is responsible for directing and conducting a wide variety of objective, policy-relevant research on crime- and criminal justice-related issues. Mr. Perrone also serves as the Director of Hawaii's federally designated Statistical Analysis Center and the state Uniform Crime Reporting Program. He has held his position since 1996, and in 2006 received the U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics' G. Paul Sylvestre Award for advancing criminal justice statistics in the states. Mr. Perrone's academic credentials include a master's degree in sociology from the University of Hawaii and a bachelor's degree in psychology from the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire. He was previously a researcher with the University of Hawaii's Youth Gang Project, and a residential counselor for delinquent adolescents.

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Perry, Steven W. is a Statistician for the U.S. Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS). Mr. Perry is a member of the Prosecution and Adjudication Statistics Unit. He serves as the program manager of the national State Court Prosecutors statistics and the nation's Justice Expenditures and Employment statistics, and is the liaison for the Indian Country Justice Statistics Program. Mr. Perry has authored several BJS publications, including Prosecutors in State Courts, 2005; American Indians and Crime, 1992-2001; Census of Tribal Justice Agencies, 2002; and Improving Criminal History Records in Indian Country, 2004-2006. He also managed the Tribal Criminal History Record Improvement Program (T-CHRIP). Prior to joining BJS in 2003, Mr. Perry was a Survey Statistician for the Census Bureau. Mr. Perry received his B.A. in sociology with a minor in criminal justice from Norfolk State University and holds an M.A. in sociology with a minor in survey methodology from the Ohio State University. Mr. Perry served in the U.S. Army working in communication security, where he was awarded the National Defense and Army Achievement medals in 1992.

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Philofsky, Rachel is the Director of the Statistical Analysis Center (SAC) at the Governor's Office of Crime Control and Prevention in Maryland. Prior to working at the SAC, she received her M.A. and B.A. in criminology and criminal justice from the University of Maryland, College Park. During graduate school, Ms. Philofsky worked as the Editor's Assistant for the academic journal Criminology and on research projects for Ray Paternoster. Prior to graduate school, she worked in the criminal justice field, first as a 911 dispatcher for the Maryland State Police, then as a Special Agent for the federal government investigating white collar crime. She has published research in the areas of capital punishment and the Washington D.C. Area Sniper Investigation.

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Plummer, Catherine has been a key participant in national information sharing, data exchange, and privacy standards efforts, and is the author of Building Exchange Content Using the Global Justice XML Data Model: A User Guide for Practitioners and Developers, published by SEARCH and the U. S. Department of Justice in May 2005. She has developed numerous technical courses and presentations focused on Interoperability in the Justice Enterprise, Business Process Modeling using the Justice Information Exchange Model (JIEM), Service Oriented and Enterprise Architecture, National Information Exchange Model (NIEM), and Global Justice XML Data Model (GJXDM), and the Practical and Policy Benefits of Component Re-Use. She holds a master's degree in public administration, with a concentration in justice administration, as well as Project Management Professional certification. She is an experienced justice information system administrator, with 20 years of progressive experience in technology development, planning, requirements analysis, procurement, implementation, and project management. She currently manages the Nlets Criminal History Information Exchange Format (CHIEF) project.

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Poteyeva, Margarita is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Sociology and Criminal Justice, University of Delaware. She has received her M.S. in criminal justice from Eastern Kentucky University. Prior to coming to the United States she practiced arbitration law in Moscow, Russia. Her current research interests include contextual variations in sentencing, policing, violence in relationships, and use of criminal justice institutions for political ends.

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Powers, Ráchael is a Statistical Analyst for the Maryland Statistical Analysis Center. Her main research interests include methodology, gender, and victimization, especially domestic violence. She received her master's degree in criminal justice/criminology from the University of Maryland and her bachelor's with a dual major in psychology/sociology from The University of Alabama in Huntsville.

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Prell, Lettie is the Director of Research for the Iowa Department of Corrections, where she provides support for the implementation of evidence-based practices in the state's corrections system. Key to her efforts is the development of research partnerships with the academic community, as well as ongoing partnership with the Iowa Division of Criminal and Juvenile Justice Planning (CJJP). The study of mentally ill offenders is an ongoing focus of her work. Previously Ms. Prell was an analyst with CJJP for 15 years, where among other things she assisted in coordinating the development of the Iowa Justice Data Warehouse (JDW), which provides a repository for key statewide corrections and court information. In 2001, JRSA awarded the Certificate of Recognition for Technical Innovation for the JDW Project as "an outstanding example of leadership in applying new technologies and analysis methods to the information needs of the justice community." She is currently a member of the Community Corrections Research Network, the Institutional Corrections Research Network, and the Research Committee of the American Correctional Association.

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Przybylski, Roger is a consultant and the founder of RKC Group, a private consulting company that provides applied research, program evaluation, and performance measurement services to organizations in the public and private sectors. Prior to forming his consulting service in 1997, Mr. Przybylski served as Associate Director for the Illinois Criminal Justice Information Authority, where he directed the authority's research division. He also has served as Coordinator of Research for the Chicago Police Department. Mr. Przybylski is a past president of the Justice Research and Statistics Association and a former director of the Illinois Statistical Analysis Center. He has been an adjunct faculty member at both Loyola University and the University of Illinois at Chicago. He also has served as staff to the Illinois Task Force on Crime and Corrections, the Governor's Commission on Gangs in Illinois, and the Illinois Legislative Committee on Juvenile Justice. Mr. Przybylski currently chairs the American Evaluation Association's crime and justice interest group. He conducts training on evaluation and cost-benefit analysis across the country. His current consulting work includes projects dealing with sentencing reform, what works in reducing recidivism, and the return on investment of criminal justice programs.

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Prins, Craig was appointed Executive Director of the Oregon Criminal Justice Commission in December 2004. His prior experience includes serving as a deputy district attorney in Portland, and counsel for the judiciary committees of the Oregon legislature. He is a graduate of the University of Notre Dame Law School.

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Raine, Emily is a Senior Resource Analyst at the Justice and Safety Center at Eastern Kentucky University. She earned a bachelor of arts degree in sociology and anthropology from Denison University and a master of public administration degree from the University of Kentucky. Her interests include research design, program evaluation, policy analysis, victimization, and hate crime. She has worked with Kentucky's Statistical Analysis Center for two and a half years. During that time, she has produced the 2004, 2005, and 2006 editions of Hate Crime and Hate Incidents in the Commonwealth, the 2004, 2005, and 2006 editions of the Sourcebook of Criminal Justice Statistics in the Commonwealth, and a white paper, "Human Trafficking in the Commonwealth." Ms. Raine also teaches a research methods course for Eastern Kentucky University's Safety, Security, and Emergency Management graduate program.

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Ramker, Gerard F. joined the Bureau of Justice Statistics, as Chief of the Criminal Justice Data Improvement Program, in October 2004. Among other things, the program administers several federal grant programs, including the National Criminal History Improvement Program, the Tribal Criminal History Record Improvement Program, the Stalking and Domestic Violence Records Improvement Program, and the State Justice Statistics Program. He came to Washington after a 20-year career working for the Illinois Criminal Justice Information Authority in Chicago, where he directed the Authority's Research and Analysis Unit, the state's Statistical Analysis Center. He also worked for the Illinois State Police directing program development efforts, research and evaluation projects for the Division of Forensic Services and Identification. He completed undergraduate studies in sociology and mathematics at St. Joseph's College (Indiana), and holds a master's degree in criminology from Indiana State University (Terre Haute, IN) and a Ph.D. in criminal justice from Sam Houston State University (Huntsville, TX).

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Rantala, Ramona has been a Statistician at the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS), U. S. Department of Justice, since 1997. As manager of the National Computer Security Survey she has analyzed the nature, scope, and consequences of cybercrime in relation to the nation's businesses. She has also analyzed the FBI's National Incident-Based Reporting System (NIBRS) data and reported on topics such as family violence statistics and the effect on crime statistics of switching from summary-based to incident-based reporting systems. Ms. Rantala is currently analyzing trends in sexual assault in NIBRS. She manages a variety of cooperative and interagency agreements with the American Statistical Association's Committee on Law and Justice Statistics and several federal agencies. These awards make funding available for general methodological research and for secondary analysis of BJS and other criminal justice data. She also oversees the National Archive of Criminal Justice Data at the University of Michigan. Prior to coming to BJS, Ms. Rantala worked on the Economic Census and Company Organization Survey at the U. S. Census Bureau. Ms. Rantala received a M. A. T. in mathematics from the University of Wisconsin, Eau Claire, and a B. A. in sociology and anthropology from Carleton College.

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Rubin, Mark is a Research Associate with the Maine Justice Policy Center (MJPC) at the Muskie School of Public Service. He directs a pilot project funded by the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) in collaboration with the Maine Department of Corrections to measure recidivism rates of adult offenders on probation and post-supervision in Maine. He was also the author of "2007 Maine Crime Victimization Report: Informing Public Policy for Safer Communities. " Prior to working at MJPC, Mr. Rubin served as Director of Research and Neighborhood Information Services at DC Agenda, a nonprofit intermediary in Washington, DC. He was also previously a Research Associate at the Urban Institute in the Metropolitan Housing and Community Development Center, where his research focused on economic development and housing challenges for low-income residents. Mr. Rubin received a bachelor's degree in international relations from Johns Hopkins University and a master's in urban planning from Columbia University.

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Ruffolo, Lyndsay is a Research Specialist for the Institute for the Study of Crime and Justice (ISCJ) at Central Connecticut State University, and has been working with the Connecticut Statistical Analysis Center for three years. During the last three years she has worked collaboratively with government, community, nonprofit, and academic entities to develop public policy initiatives and has assisted in the preparation and dissemination of publications. Ms. Ruffolo has also worked with university faculty on various criminal justice-related projects and publications, including inmate recidivism, prison population and forecasting, New Britain Connecticut Weed and Seed initiative, and family violence case flow. Ms. Ruffolo is currently a candidate for a master of science degree in criminal justice at Central Connecticut State University.

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Sabol, William has 20 years of experience conducting research on criminal justice and criminological issues in several settings. He is currently the Chief of the Corrections Statistics Program at the Bureau of Justice Statistics, where since December 2006 he has directed BJS' efforts to study prison, jail, and community supervision populations. As an Assistant Director at the Government Accountability Office (2003-2006), he directed projects in response to Congressional mandates and requests on federal criminal justice and homeland security policy issues. As Associate Director of the Center on Urban Poverty and Social Change at Case Western Reserve University (2000-2003), he directed the Center's community studies efforts and conducted research on post-prison employment of ex-offenders, the prevalence of child abuse and neglect, and juvenile detention facilities. As a Senior Research Associate at the Urban Institute (1995-2000), he directed projects on federal criminal statistics and research on the impacts of incarceration on communities. He received his Ph.D. in 1988 from the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs at the University of Pittsburgh after having been a Fulbright Scholar at the University of Cambridge.

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Salo, Theresa is Deputy Commissioner of the Office of Justice Research and Performance for the New York State Division of Criminal Justice Services. She joined the Division of Criminal Justice Services (DCJS) in 2003 to establish a performance management program for New York's criminal justice system, and assumed responsibility for the Bureau of Research in 2007. In recognition of her outstanding service, Ms. Salo was awarded the prestigious 2007 Alfred E. Smith Award from the American Society of Public Administration. Prior to joining DCJS, she served as the Director of Policy Analysis at the Division of Parole for 10 years. She also spent 9 years at the Division of Budget, with oversight responsibility for numerous criminal justice agencies. She holds a master's degree in public administration from the State University of New York at Albany.

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Sekino, Anya currently serves as a State DMC (Disproportionate Minority Contact) and Cultural Competency Coordinator for the Oregon Commission on Children and Families. The scope of her work includes coordinating statewide projects and initiatives designed to eliminate disparities in treatment and services, and reduce overrepresentation of minority youth in Oregon's juvenile justice system. She has been working on implementation of evidence-based practices throughout the OCCF system, as well as cultural competency policy development and training. She holds master's of art degrees in linguistics and education from St. Petersburg State University in Russia.

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Shaler, George is a Research Associate in the criminal justice and public health programs at the Muskie School of Public Service. He provides program evaluation and consultation services to state and local government agencies as well as community-based organizations. Mr. Shaler has extensive experience in the application of statistical methods and techniques. During his tenure with the Maine SAC, Mr. Shaler has worked on county jail trends, disproportionate minority contact, prison/jail health care issues, community policing program evaluation, and juvenile and adult recidivism analysis.

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Shields, Ryan T. is currently a doctoral student at the College of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Florida State University. Mr. Shields graduated from the University of Baltimore in May 2008 with his master's degree in criminal justice. While completing his master's degree, Mr. Shields also served as the Program Manager of the Maryland Violent Death Reporting System, a statewide surveillance system that monitors and collects detailed data on violent deaths (e.g., homicide, suicide, deaths of undetermined intent) that occurred in Maryland or to Maryland residents. His research interests include homicide, violent victimization, and program evaluation.

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Smith, Erica has been a Statistician at the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) in the U.S. Department of Justice since 2001. Ms. Smith currently works in the Recidivism, Re-entry, and Special Projects division of BJS, where she conducts research on domestic violence, elder abuse, recidivism, and police use of force. Prior to working at BJS, she was a graduate fellow at the American University in Washington, DC, where she coauthored several articles and research reports on policing and taught undergraduate courses on research and statistics as well as introductory criminal justice.

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Steffey, Danielle M.  is a Social Science Research Associate at RTI International. She is the Data Analysis Task Leader for the Multi-Site Evaluation of the Serious and Violent Offender Reentry Initiative. Her research interests and experience include multi-site evaluation design and implementation, criminal justice alternatives for offenders with substance abuse or co-occurring disorders, prisoner reentry, substance abuse etiology and treatment, and violence prevention. She received an A.B. in psychology from Duke University and an M.S. in criminology from Florida State University.

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Stevenson, Phillip is the Director of the Arizona Statistical Analysis Center (SAC). The Arizona SAC is currently conducting research in Arizona on illegal immigration, gangs, homicide, prison inmate recidivism, and youth substance use and delinquency. Mr. Stevenson and his staff are also responsible for collecting data on cross-border communications between law enforcement agencies in Arizona and Sonora, Mexico. Prior to becoming the Director of the Arizona SAC, Mr. Stevenson worked for the Illinois Criminal Justice Information Authority as the Acting Associate Director and head of the Research and Analysis Unit. He is currently a member of the National Institute of Justice's Community Corrections Research Network, the Global Justice Information Sharing Initiative's Privacy and Information Quality Working Group, and the Arizona Juvenile Justice Commission's Disproportionate Minority Contact Subcommittee. In addition he serves as Secretary Treasurer of the Justice Research and Statistics Association (JRSA); Chair of JRSA's Training, Technical Assistance, and Technology Committee; and Chair of the Arizona Substance Abuse Partnership Epidemiology Work Group. He is also adjunct faculty for the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Arizona State University, where he teaches crime and delinquency prevention and community justice.

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Taylor, Bruce is the Director of Research for the Police Executive Research Forum (PERF). Dr. Taylor has 17 years of professional experience in research design, randomized field experiments, statistical analysis, measurement, survey design, and program evaluation. He has conducted and supervised research projects using these techniques for federal, state and local governments, private foundations and corporations, a victim services organization in New York City, and the New Jersey court system. Dr. Taylor has conducted studies in the areas of law enforcement, treatment for violent offenders, domestic violence, victim assistance programs, homeland security, psychological effects of victimization, and dynamics of drug markets. His recent peer-reviewed research has been published in Criminology, Police Quarterly, Journal of Experimental Criminology, Forensic Science International, Justice Quarterly, and Journal of Personality and Social Psychology.

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VanNostrand, Marie is a Senior Consultant with Luminosity, Inc., a criminal justice consulting firm specializing in the pretrial stage of the criminal justice system. A nationally recognized expert in pretrial services, risk assessment, and jail population management with an emphasis on the pretrial population, Dr. VanNostrand is a pioneer in multijurisdictional pretrial risk assessment and the field of pretrial services legal and evidence-based practices. She is a recognized expert consultant for the National Institute of Corrections and Office of Probation and Pretrial Services. She is the author of Legal and Evidence Based Practices: Application of Legal Principles, Laws, and Research to the Field of Pretrial Services, commissioned and published by the National Institute of Corrections and Crime and Justice Institute. Prior to entering the consulting business, Dr. VanNostrand worked in the criminal justice system at the state and local levels for over 10 years, including work in pretrial services, probation, parole, and alcohol safety. She earned her bachelor of science degree in criminal justice from Syracuse University, and master's degrees in public administration and urban studies and a Ph.D. in urban services-public management from Old Dominion University.

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Wambeam, Rodney is Manager of the Center for Justice Research and a Senior Research Scientist at the Wyoming Survey & Analysis Center (WYSAC) of the University of Wyoming. He is also an Adjunct Professor in the Department of Political Science at UW. Dr. Wambeam completed his Ph.D. at the University of Nebraska - Lincoln in 1999 and served as policy advisor to Nebraska Governor Ben Nelson. He was Director of the Evaluation Research Department at the Nebraska Council to Prevent Alcohol and Drug Abuse before moving home to Wyoming in 2002. At WYSAC, Dr. Wambeam oversees numerous criminal justice and substance abuse prevention research projects. He was Principal Investigator of Wyoming's 21st Century State Incentive Grant and is currently Principal Investigator of Wyoming's Federal Prevention Block Grant and Strategic Prevention Framework State Incentive Grant. He facilitates the State Epidemiological Workgroup for Substance Abuse Prevention and is a member of Wyoming's State Advisory Council for Substance Abuse Prevention. In his free time Dr. Wambeam is an avid trail runner. He is founder and coach of Wyoming's only ice speed skating team, and is currently organizing Quidditch games for youth and their parents.

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Wheeler, Karen is the Addictions Policy Administrator for the Addictions and Mental Health (AMH) Division. Ms. Wheeler has 23 years of experience in Oregon's addiction prevention, treatment, and recovery system. She holds a bachelor's degree in community health education and a master's degree in organizational management. As Addictions Policy Administrator for AMH, Ms. Wheeler oversees a broad range of statewide addiction prevention, treatment, and recovery services. She has over 11 years of experience providing community-based addiction treatment services and has specialized in treating offender populations in both community and institutional settings throughout her career. She has 8 years of experience working for AMH as a treatment specialist focusing on quality assurance, program and policy development, and statewide system enhancement, and over 4 years of executive management experience with AMH providing leadership for statewide policy initiatives.

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White, Bonita the Director of the Community Justice Assistance Division (CJAD) of the Texas Department of Criminal Justice (TDCJ) since 2000, has been in public service for more than 27 years. In her current position she has oversight of the 122 local community supervision and corrections departments (adult probation) that supervise more than 431,000 adult probationers statewide. CJAD's primary responsibilities are distributing state formula and grant funds; implementing legislation; developing standards, including best-practice treatment standards; approving Community Supervision and Corrections Departments' (CSCD) community justice plans and budgets; conducting program and fiscal audits; evaluating state-funded programs for their effectiveness at reducing recidivism; and training and certifying Texas community supervision officers. Ms. White, who began her career as a probation officer, received a master's degree in public administration from Angelo State University in San Angelo, Texas, in 1994. In 1995 she was the Assistant Director of the seven-county Tom Green CSCD when she left to join CJAD as Deputy Director of Field Operations. She was named CJAD's Deputy Division Director in 1996.

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Wicklund, Carl has over 35 years' experience in the corrections/human services field. He is the Executive Director of the American Probation and Parole Association. He served as the director of a three county adult and juvenile probation and parole department as well as developed and managed a variety of community-based, private sector programs for juveniles and adults involved with the justice or social services systems. He has served on numerous nationally oriented advisory groups and is currently the vice-chair of the Global Justice Information Sharing Initiative advisory committee, which advises the U.S. Attorney General, and chairs its Privacy and Information Quality Working Group. He received the first annual Minnesota Citizens Council on Crime and Justice - Gisela Konopka Award in 1984 for humane and creative treatment of juvenile delinquents, the 2001 Florida Community Corrections Association's Life Time Achievement Award, the first U.S. Congressional Crime Victims' Rights Caucus Allied Professional Award in 2006, and the 2007 Justice Leadership Award from Family Justice.

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Williams, Max became Director of the Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) in January 2004. He was appointed by Governor Ted Kulongoski after serving in the Oregon Legislative Assembly, where he was chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, chairman of the Legislative Counsel Committee and a senior member of the House Revenue Committee. He was a practicing attorney for more than 12 years at the Portland law firm Miller Nash LLP. As Director, Mr. Williams oversees the operations of 14 different prisons with over 13,000 incarcerated persons, a biennial budget of more than $1.4 billion dollars, and a staff of 4,300 employees. He has helped launch a number of Department initiatives targeted at delivering programs and services that will reduce the reoffense rate among releasing offenders, including cognitive education, alcohol and drug treatment, and mental health services. Born and raised in Bend, Oregon, Mr. Williams earned a bachelor of science degree in information management from Brigham Young University and attended law school at Northwestern School of Law at Lewis & Clark College. He graduated magna cum laude in 1991.

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Wilson, Michael is an economist for the Oregon Criminal Justice Commission and the state's Statistical Analysis Center Director. Mr. Wilson received his bachelor's and master's degrees in economics from the University of California at San Diego (UCSD), where he also worked as a research analyst. He was also an adjunct faculty member at Point Loma Nazarene University. Before being named SAC Director, he was an economist for the Oregon Employment Department.

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Wing, Janeena J. is the Director of the Statistical Analysis Center in Idaho, housed within the Idaho State Police. Her most recent research includes a police allocation model for the state police, evaluations of STOP (Services, Training, Officers, and Prosecutors)- and Byrne/Justice Assistance Grant (JAG)-funded programs, examining drug and alcohol arrests in Idaho using National Incident-Based Reporting System police reports, and a statewide victimization survey. Ms. Wing received her M.A. in sociology from Idaho State University.

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Yearwood, Douglas L. is the Director of the North Carolina Criminal Justice Analysis Center. Prior to assuming this position he held social research positions with the Federal Bureau of Prisons and the state Attorney General's Office. In addition to governmental reports, he has published articles and book reviews in Justice Research and Policy, the British Journal of Criminology, Criminal Justice Policy Review, the Journal of Family Violence, the American Journal of Police, Children and Youth Services Review, African American Male Research, the Journal of Gang Research, the F.B.I. Law Enforcement Bulletin, Criminologist, Federal Probation, Police Chief and American Jails. He is coauthor, with James Klopovic and Michael Vasu, of the book Effective Program Practices for At-Risk Youth: A Continuum of Community-Based Programs, published by the Civic Research Institute. Mr. Yearwood holds a B.S. in criminal justice and a B.A. in psychology from North Carolina Wesleyan College and an M.S. in criminal justice from North Carolina Central University. He is also a Certified Public Manager through the state personnel office and an Advanced Certified Law Enforcement Planner through the International Association of Law Enforcement Planners. He is the current Past President of the Justice Research and Statistics Association.

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Zedlewski, Edwin is the Senior Scientific Advisor to the Director of the National Institute of Justice (NIJ). He joined NIJ in 1975 and has served in a variety of research and administrative capacities. He gained advanced degrees in mathematical statistics and economics and has authored numerous articles on crime policy, public sector performance measurement and program evaluation, and cost-benefit analysis. In addition to his Institute work, he has served as a special consultant to the United States Sentencing Commission, the Solicitor General of the United States, and the President's Organized Crime Commission. He is currently participating in a European Economic Commission study to estimate the social costs of crime in the European Union. His current duties involve integrating the physical science and social science activities at NIJ so that technology and forensics research programs are policy relevant. He also supervises NIJ's international research activities, where he is establishing NIJ as an export-import bank for exchanges of social and technological innovations.

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