BJS/JRSA 2010 National Conference - October 28-29, 2010 in Portland, Maine
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Speaker Biographies



ADAMS, CHRISTINE is a Statistical Analyst for the Office of Research and Statistics (ORS) within the Colorado Division of Criminal Justice, Department of Public Safety. Since joining ORS in the fall of 2007, Dr. Adams has helped staff the Governor's Criminal and Juvenile Justice Commission, which includes writing annual reports on the progress and recommendations of the Commission as well as facilitating task force and workgroup meetings. In addition, Dr. Adams has helped evaluate multiple offender programs. Dr. Adams completed her Ph.D. at the University of Wyoming in 2007 and served as a graduate assistant at the Wyoming Survey & Analysis Center (WYSAC) of the University of Wyoming.

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ALBRIGHT, DANIELLE is a Ph.D. candidate in sociology at the University of New Mexico. Her research interests include gendered violence, social movements, and public policy. As a Research Assistant at the New Mexico Statistical Analysis Center, she contributed to projects that examined the use and effectiveness of domestic violence interventions, corrections reentry programming, law enforcement and community responses to gang crime, and neighborhood crime.

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ANASTASIA, TRENA is an Assistant Research Scientist at the University of Wyoming. Now in her second year at the Wyoming Survey & Analysis Center, she has put her 10 years of publishing experience to use in writing annual reports. She recently served as Principal Investigator on the Wyoming Drug Free Youth Groups study and enjoys all forms of social justice research, specifically, qualitative work. As a Women's Studies adjunct instructor, she enjoys teaching women and leadership as well as communications courses.

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ARRIGONA, NANCY is Director of Research with the Texas Juvenile Probation Commission. As Director, she is responsible for conducting juvenile justice program evaluations, policy impact analysis, cost-effectiveness studies, performance measure development, the development and implementation of statewide assessment instruments and tools, and statistical modeling and analysis. Prior to her employment with the Juvenile Probation Commission, Ms. Arrigona was the Director of Research for the Texas Criminal Justice Policy Council. She has developed, designed, and directed evaluations of pilot and existing programs in corrections, juvenile justice, prevention, human services, mental health, and education. She acts as an advisor on the development of evaluation designs and the implementation of research efforts, and serves as a member to numerous advisory boards and task force efforts. Ms. Arrigona holds a Bachelor of Arts in government from the University of Texas at Austin and a Master of Public Affairs from the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs at the same institution.

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BANKS, DUREN is the Chief of the Prosecution and Adjudication Unit at the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS). Her duties include oversight of several court-related data collection activities and publications, including the National Judicial Reporting Program and the State Courts Processing Statistics Data Collection Program. She also manages projects focused on specific crimes and populations, including the Human Trafficking Reporting System and American Indian criminal justice statistics. Prior to joining BJS, Dr. Banks managed a number of research and evaluation projects in subject areas such as alternatives to prison, prisoner reentry, domestic violence, and criminal justice system sentencing practices and impact. She earned her Ph.D. in criminology from the University of Maryland.

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BALES, BILL is an Associate Professor in the College of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Florida State University. Prior to joining the faculty at FSU in 2003, Dr. Bales was the Director of Research with the Florida Department of Corrections since 1991. His interests include sentencing research, assessing the effectiveness and consequences of punishment and correctional strategies, and community reentry issues among incarcerated adult and juvenile populations. He has published in various academic journals and government publications and presented research findings at corrections, criminal justice, and statistics conferences over the past 25 years.

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BERGSTROM, MARK H. is the Executive Director of the Pennsylvania Commission on Sentencing, a position he has held since April 1998. He serves as the Commission's liaison with the General Assembly, the Administrative Office of Pennsylvania Courts, the Governor's Office, other state and local agencies, and with the various administrative units of The Pennsylvania State University, with which the Commission is affiliated. Mr. Bergstrom is a Senior Lecturer in Crime, Law and Justice at The Pennsylvania State University, where he teaches undergraduate courses in Sentencing and the Courts; an Adjunct Professor of Law at the Duquesne University School of Law, where he teaches an elective course on Sanctions, Sentencing & Corrections; and an Adjunct Faculty at the Villanova University School of Law where he assists with the annual Villanova Sentencing Workshop. Mr. Bergstrom also serves as a State Sentencing & Corrections Associate with the Vera Institute of Justice, providing technical assistance to jurisdictions on sentencing and corrections reforms. Since 2002, he has participated in engagements in the District of Columbia as well as the states of Alabama, Connecticut, Illinois, Nebraska, New Jersey, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Utah, and Washington.

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BIBEL, DANIEL B. is the Program Manager of the Crime Reporting Unit of the Massachusetts State Police - Commonwealth Fusion Center, a position he has held since 1988. Mr. Bibel has been involved in the development and implementation of the FBI's National Incident-Based Reporting System (NIBRS) at both the national and state levels since 1989. Under his direction, Massachusetts became one of the first states in the nation to become a certified NIBRS reporter. One of his innovations in the Massachusetts program was the development of standards for transmission of incident address data, permitting the Massachusetts' program to become the first in the nation with the ability to geocode and map crime data. Prior to his appointment to his current position, Mr. Bibel was the director of the Massachusetts Statistical Analysis Center. He has a master of science degree in criminal justice from Northeastern University, and has done post-graduate work at Rutgers - The State University of New Jersey. Mr. Bibel has extensively reported and spoken on issues dealing with crime reporting, crime analysis and mapping, and data quality in police reporting. He is currently the president of the Association of State Uniform Crime Reporting Programs.

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BILESKI, MATTHEW T. is a Research Analyst for the Statistical Analysis Center at the Arizona Criminal Justice Commission. Since beginning his research work in Arizona, Mr. Bileski has utilized the state criminal history records repository for a variety of research projects. His experience consists of research on the improvement of criminal history records, as well as studies employing the analysis of criminal history data. This most recently includes The Reporting of Sexual Assault in Arizona: 2008 report and the State Criminal History Records Improvement: Arizona Felony Case Processing report. Mr. Bileski is currently a member of the Subcommittee on Violence for the Arizona Injury Prevention Advisory Council. He received his M.A. in criminology and criminal justice at the University of Missouri-St. Louis and his B.A. in psychology and a B.A. in sociology at the University of Missouri-Columbia.

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BLACKBURN, JOHN A., JR.  was appointed as the Executive Director of the Arizona Criminal Justice Commission (ACJC) in July 2004. Prior to working for ACJC, Mr. Blackburn served over 20 years with the Mesa Police Department and retired as the lieutenant over Planning and Analysis in November 2000. For nearly 17 years, Mr. Blackburn has been actively involved in the state legislative process. He serves on several committees, including the National Criminal Justice Association's Executive Board and its Advisory Council, the Arizona Peace Officers Memorial Board, the Cross Border Communications Committee, the DNA and Forensic Technology Task Force, the U.S. Attorney's District of Arizona Law Enforcement Coordinating Committee, and the Drug and Gang Policy subcommittee. He was also appointed by the Governor to serve as a member of Arizona's Homeland Security Senior Advisory Council in 2010.

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BOGUE, BRADFORD is a seasoned investigator, author, and internationally recognized expert in probation case management practices. Mr. Bogue has been the Primary Investigator (PI) for over 70 program evaluations, workload analyses, and outcome studies in community corrections. He designed the Risk & Resiliency Check-Up assessment that RAND Corporation recently validated, along with numerous other innovations for the field (e.g., automated case plan applications, QA systems, etc.). Mr. Bogue was trained in 1992 as a Motivational Interviewing (MI) trainer by William Miller. Since then he has offered training in MI, exploring methods for MI QA, and implementing MI "to scale" in corrections. He was the lead author of a definitive book on case planning (The Probation and Parole Treatment Planner, Wiley, 2003), as well as the NIC position paper on "The Principles of Effective Interventions," which serves as NIC's current model for evidence-based practices (EBP) in field supervision. Currently Mr. Bogue is the PI for several national multisite projects related to EBP.

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BOURGON, GUY is a clinical psychologist with a specialization in correctional and criminal justice psychology. He has more than 25 years of clinical experience in the assessment and treatment of adults and youths involved in the criminal justice system. Dr. Bourgon has been involved in the development of various effective correctional programs and has extensive experience in the training and supervision of various frontline professionals. He is presently a Senior Researcher for Public Safety Canada conducting research on effective correctional services and practices. As the co-lead on the Strategic Training Initiative in Community Supervision, he played a significant role in the development of its community supervision model, the training of probation officers and their clinical supervision, as well as the evaluation of the Risk-Need-Responsivity approach to offender supervision. He has published articles on effective correctional treatment across a range of offender populations and programs, risk assessment, research methodology, and effective knowledge transfer to everyday practice. Dr. Bourgon maintains a private practice, is an adjunct professor at Carleton University, and is a member of the Editorial Board of Criminal Justice and Behavior.

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BROIDY, LISA is Director of the New Mexico Statistical Analysis Center. The NM SAC is housed at the University of New Mexico, where Dr. Broidy also directs the Institute for Social Research and is an Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology. Dr. Broidy's research interests run from theoretical to applied. Her theoretical research focuses particularly on gender differences in the causes and consequences of criminal behavior. Her applied research interests focus on systemic responses to domestic violence and on offender reentry.

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BUCK WILLISON, JANEEN is a Research Associate in the Justice Policy Center at Urban Institute. She has more than a decade of experience managing and directing complex multisite studies of youth and adult populations, and evaluating innovative criminal and juvenile justice policies and programs. Current projects focus on effective transition from jail to the community; youth in the federal justice system; faith-based prisoner reentry programs; and criminal justice interventions for mentally ill offenders. Ms. Buck Willison is Evaluation Director for the Transition from Jails to Community initiative and directed the recently completed Assessing Policy Options study, which measured practitioner perceptions of changes in juvenile justice policy. She holds a master's degree in justice, law and society from American University in Washington, D.C.

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BURCH, ANDREA M. is a Statistician in the Law Enforcement Unit at the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS). She is the program manager for BJS's Arrest-Related Deaths collection and is working to further develop a Police Use of Force series. In addition, her responsibilities include developing a longitudinal file for the Law Enforcement Management and Administrative Statistics (LEMAS) data and analyzing changes in police organizations over time. Prior to joining BJS, she taught research methods at the College of Criminal Justice at Northeastern University.

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BURTON, SUE is the Director of Florida's Statistical Analysis Center (FSAC) at the Florida Department of Law Enforcement, and current past president of the Justice Research and Statistics Association. She has been the FSAC Director since 1995 and has over 20 years of criminal justice experience. Her prior criminal justice experience includes working for the Florida Criminal Justice Standards and Training Commission, evaluating officer training and standards programs, conducting strategic planning, and developing an officer information system. She has also served as a researcher for the Florida Supreme Court in the areas of sentencing guidelines, jury management, plea bargaining, and court information systems. In 1998, she was awarded the prestigious Bureau of Justice Statistics' G. Paul Sylvestre Award. Ms. Burton is an International Association of Law Enforcement Certified Planner, and a graduate of Florida State University's College of Business.

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BUTLER, STEVE conducts applied research in the areas of criminal justice, primarily prisoner reentry, parole violation, offender substance abuse, drug courts, and offender risk assessment instruments. Recent projects at the Wyoming Survey & Analysis Center (WYSAC) focus on data collection and research on the life conditions and attitudes of Native Americans living on reservations (including crime and substance abuse), and also an outcome evaluation project of unemployed/under-employed single mothers after completion of job training programming. Mr. Butler has worked as principal investigator for several projects and on technical reports, including Drug Courts in Wyoming, FY 2005 Statewide and Local Evaluation; The Wyoming Addicted Offender Accountability Act: The Candidates, Substance Abuse Assessment, and Treatment Recommendations; Recidivism Survival Analysis of the Serious and Violent Offender Reentry Program Initiative 2003-2007. He has an M.A. in sociology from the University of Wyoming.

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BYNUM, TIM is the Director of the Michigan Statistical Analysis Center. He is also the Director of the National Archive of Criminal Justice Data, a division of the Interuniversity Consortium on Political and Social Research at the University of Michigan. Dr. Bynum is a professor in the School of Criminal Justice at Michigan State University, where his principal area of research is the evaluation of criminal justice policies and interventions. He is currently the co-principal investigator on several projects, including the evaluation of the Department of Justice's Comprehensive Anti-Gang Initiative as well as a project involving the impact of sex offender residency restrictions.

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CARUSO, PATRICIA L. joined the Michigan Department of Corrections in 1988 and has served in several capacities, including three years as Business Manager, nine years as Warden, two years as Regional Prison Administrator, and 10 months as Deputy Director. In July of 2003, she was appointed Director of the Department. Director Caruso received a B.A. in political science and sociology from Lake Superior State University and a master's in comprehensive occupational education from the University of Michigan. Director Caruso was re-elected Vice President of the American Correctional Association (ACA) for a two-year term beginning in August 2010. She is also serving as the President of the Association of State Correctional Administrators and previously served as their Vice President and Treasurer. She is a past member of the ACA Commission on Accreditation for Corrections, the ACA Standards Committee, and the ACA Program Planning Committee. She is also a past president of the North American Association of Wardens and Superintendents and remains active in a number of other professional correctional organizations.

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COHEN, THOMAS H. has been a Statistician with the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) since 2003. His primary work focuses on courts, trials, juries, and case processing in both the civil and criminal fields. Dr. Cohen has written several BJS reports examining all phases of felony case processing from arrest through pretrial release, adjudication, and sentencing. Dr. Cohen also works extensively on the civil side of state court systems. His writing in this area includes an analysis of tort, contract, and real property trial and appellate litigation in state courts. Prior to joining BJS, Dr. Cohen held research positions at the Pretrial Justice Institute and the National Center for State Courts. He received a Ph.D. from the Rutgers School of Criminal Justice and a law degree from the University of Maryland Law School.

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CONNELLY, MICHAEL is currently Administrator of the Evaluation & Analysis Unit of the Oklahoma Department of Corrections. He previously served as Executive Director of sentencing commissions in Maryland and Wisconsin. Prior to that, he was Research Director for the Oklahoma Criminal Justice Resource Center, which staffed the state sentencing commission and allowed him to serve as state Statistical Analysis Center Director. He has also managed grant projects for the Justice Research and Statistics Association and been an Associate Professor of public policy and administration for Southwestern Oklahoma State University, as well as an adjunct for the University of Maryland, Norwich University, and the University of Oklahoma. His research has appeared in policy, political science, education, criminal justice, and sentencing journals as well as in professional and government publications. He previously served on the executive board of the National Association of Sentencing Commissions. He received his Ph.D. in political science from the University of Missouri.

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DORSEY, CARMEN is Director of the Maine Statistical Analysis Center, located at the University of Southern Maine's Muskie School of Public Service. Ms. Dorsey also directs the Muskie School Justice Policy Program, which informs policy development and practice in civil, criminal, and social justice systems in Maine and the nation and provides opportunities for students to learn and apply research skills outside the classroom. Ms. Dorsey has over 20 years of experience working with justice and public welfare policy and practice issues in government, university, and nonprofit settings. She serves on the board of Volunteers of America Northern New England, and is a delegate on the JRSA Executive Committee. She received her law degree from the University of Maine School of Law and bachelor's degree in political science from Wellesley College.

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DUROSE, MATTHEW has a master's degree in criminal justice from the University of Baltimore. He is a Statistician in the Recidivism, Reentry, and Special Projects section of the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS). Mr. Durose has managed a variety of BJS data collections, including the National Judicial Reporting Program, the Census of Publicly Funded Forensic Crime Laboratories, and the Police-Public Contact Survey. He is currently working with other BJS statisticians to develop a standardized approach to collecting and processing multistate criminal history information for statistical analysis. His current projects include a recidivism study of domestic violence offenders in large urban counties and the 2005 National Recidivism Study of Released Prisoners.

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FAROLE, DONALD J., JR.&nsbp;is a Statistician with the Prosecutions and Adjudications Unit at the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS), U.S. Department of Justice. His research interests include justice system responses to intimate partner violence, recidivism, and pro se litigants in criminal and civil litigation. Prior to joining BJS, he conducted research and evaluation on drug courts and other innovative justice system programs. He also has published research on state appellate courts, including a book and several articles in professional journals. Dr. Farole received his Ph.D. from Indiana University.

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FARRELL, AMY is the Associate Director of the Institute on Race and Justice at Northeastern University in Boston. Her research focuses on the administration of justice with emphasis on measuring the effect of race and gender in police, prosecution, and sentencing practices. In recent research, she has examined how variable levels of racial group and gender representation among court workgroups relate to district-level differences in sentencing. Dr. Farrell is also engaged in research examining jury outcomes, particularly the factors that predict and explain acquittals. She also conducts research on police legitimacy and law enforcement responses to new crimes such as hate crime and human trafficking. She is currently overseeing a national data collection program on law enforcement investigations of human trafficking for the Bureau of Justice Statistics and a study on state and local prosecution of human trafficking cases for the National Institute of Justice. She has testified about law enforcement identification of human trafficking before the U.S. House of Representatives Judiciary Committee. Dr. Farrell's research has appeared in numerous scholarly publications, including recent publications in Criminology and Public Policy, Crime and Delinquency, Law and Society Review, and the Annals of the Academy of Political and Social Science. Dr. Farrell was a co-recipient of the National Institute of Justice's W.E.B. DuBois Fellowship on crime, justice, and culture in 2006. She earned her doctorate from Northeastern University's Law, Policy, and Society Program and her master's in sociology from the University of Delaware.

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FARRAR-OWENS, MEREDITH is the Deputy Director of the Virginia Criminal Sentencing Commission. There, she plays a lead role in the development, implementation, and administration of Virginia's sentencing guidelines. She has conducted research on such subjects as offender risk assessment, sex offender recidivism, drug crime, and probation violators. For many years, she has performed analysis to assess the fiscal impact of proposed criminal justice legislation. Prior to arriving at the Commission in 1995, she worked for the Virginia Department of Criminal Justice Services, where, in addition to forecasting inmate populations, she served as technical staff for Governor George Allen's Commission on Parole Abolition and Sentencing Reform. The work of this group ushered in sweeping reform of Virginia's criminal justice system in 1994. She has also worked with Virginia's Department of Corrections and Department of Juvenile Justice. Ms. Farrar-Owens is a graduate of the University of Virginia, where she received a Bachelor of Arts degree in economics with a minor in government. She completed her master's degree in sociology at Virginia Commonwealth University. She is the current President of the National Association of Sentencing Commissions.

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FRANDSEN, RONALD J.  received a B.S. in business administration and an M.A. in urban affairs from St. Louis University, and a J.D. from Wayne State University. His professional experience includes employment as a research attorney for the Michigan Court of Appeals and as a contract attorney with the Michigan State Appellate Defender Office. Mr. Frandsen is currently employed as a Grants Administrator at the Regional Justice Information Service (REJIS) in St. Louis, Missouri, and conducts research on the impact of federal and state firearms laws. He is the author of "Enforcement of the Brady Act" (three editions, 2006-2008), and a coauthor of the "Survey of State Procedures Related to Firearm Sales" (six editions, 2000-2005), "Federal Firearms Cases" (two editions, FY 2007 and FY 2008), and "Trends for Background Checks for Firearm Transfers, 1999-2008."

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GARNER, JOEL is the Chief of the Law Enforcement Statistics Unit at the Bureau of Justice Statistics. He has published more than 40 articles on police response to domestic violence, police use of force, court delay, the prosecution of intimate partner violence, and the use of experimental methods. Dr. Garner previously served as the deputy to the Director of Research at the National Institute of Justice, the Research Director at the U.S. Sentencing Commission, and the Director of Research at the Joint Centers for Justice Studies, Inc.

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GILMER, JIM is a researcher at the New York State Division of Criminal Justice Services (DCJS), where he has worked for more than 20 years. In 2007, Mr. Gilmer was appointed chief of the Crime Research and Analysis unit in the Office of Justice Research and Performance and oversees projects in a variety of areas, including domestic violence, juvenile justice, and sex offender risk assessment, as well as the analysis of crime patterns. He recently concluded a temporary appointment as Director of Research for the Governor's Task Force on Police-on-Police Shootings. Mr. Gilmer's focal interest includes analyzing and understanding temporal and spatial relationships between crime and offending patterns. A graduate of the University of Notre Dame, he holds a master's degree in criminal justice from the UAlbany School of Criminal Justice, where he was a doctoral candidate prior to joining DCJS. He also serves on the New York State GIS Coordinating Body and teaches crime analysis using GIS at the College of Saint Rose.

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GLAZE, LAUREN has been a Statistician with the Corrections Statistics Unit of the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) for 12 years. Her work has focused primarily on community corrections and she has coauthored the BJS annual bulletin on community corrections since 1998. Ms. Glaze has also conducted research on special inmate populations, such as incarcerated parents and inmates with mental health problems, and coauthored BJS reports on both topics. Mental health has been an ongoing focus of her research, and she has been working with mental health experts on a project to develop and validate a screener for BJS's national omnibus surveys of prison and jail inmates to estimate the prevalence of severe psychological disorders among the incarcerated population. She is also directing a project to redesign BJS's national omnibus surveys of prison and jail inmates, which have been conducted periodically since 1974. Ms. Glaze received her Master of Science degree from the Joint Program in Survey Methodology at the University of Maryland and her Bachelor of Arts degree in criminology and criminal justice from the University of Maryland.

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GOAN, SARAH KRICHELS manages the South Portland, Maine, office of Hornby Zeller Associates, a research and evaluation firm. Since joining the firm in 2006, her primary areas of focus include substance abuse prevention, mental health, and trauma-informed systems of care. Ms. Goan serves as Project Manager for the state, community, and program-level evaluation of Maine's Strategic Prevention Framework State Incentive Grant (SPF SIG) through the Maine Office of Substance Abuse (OSA). In this capacity, she drafted Maine's Strategic Prevention Framework Guide to Evaluation and Planning for grantees, conducted a number of statewide surveys, performed stakeholder interviews, developed a community-level infrastructure assessment, drafted coalition logic models, and compiled state-level epidemiological data into county-level profiles to help grantees identify at-risk populations and areas of need to be targeted by their prevention efforts. Throughout the project, she has also provided technical assistance to grantees, as needed. Ms. Goan has authored a series of reports for the Community Epidemiology Surveillance Network (CESN), a workgroup organized by OSA; the reports monitor current trends in substance use and are often cited by local and national media. She also leads the evaluation effort on behalf of Maine's Higher Education Alcohol Prevention Partnership (HEAPP), a statewide initiative to prevent high-risk drinking on college campuses. Ms. Goan has analyzed data from the project's survey of college students and conducted focus groups with college students across the state. In addition to her prevention work for the state of Maine, Ms. Goan works with the Northeast Regional Expert Team (NE RET, formerly NE CAPT) to provide technical assistance to state and local agencies working to prevent substance abuse throughout the region. Ms. Goan has played a central role in Maine's Trauma-Informed System of Care project, intended to build a statewide infrastructure supporting the trauma-informed approach to mental health services for children with serious emotional disturbances. For this project, Ms. Goan developed a statewide agency assessment tool being implemented by Maine's Children's Behavioral Health Services and she leads evaluation and reporting efforts, regularly reporting to the federal evaluation team. More recently, Ms. Goan has been developing the evaluation protocols for a newly funded program in Maine aimed at bridging the service gap between the children's and adult's mental health systems for transitioning youth. She is also serving as project director for an evaluation of the state of Nebraska's Behavioral Health Help Line, Family Navigator and Post Adoption/Post Guardianship Services. Prior to her arrival at HZA, Ms. Goan was a Research Analyst for the Institute for Higher Education Policy in Washington, DC, where she co-authored several publications examining student persistence and degree completion, institutional characteristics, and the benefits of higher education. Ms. Goan holds an M.A. in public policy from The George Washington University. She earned her B.A. in political science from Tufts University.

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GOUT, DIANE received her Ph.D. from Boston University in the Interdisciplinary Sociology and Social Work Program. Her research is focused on understanding historical trauma and other factors associated with the disproportionately high rates of intimate partner violence against American Indian and Alaska Native women. She has worked with this population for over eight years. Dr. Gout is also employed as a Senior Research Associate with the Justice Policy Program at the Muskie School of Public Service, University of Southern Maine. She has worked in the field of violence against women for more than 20 years. She has experience in trauma-based practice and has worked with survivors of rape, incest, and domestic violence. In addition to direct practice intervention, Dr. Gout has worked with multi-disciplinary teams to develop policies and protocols, evaluate systems, and conduct research on issues of trauma and abuse. She has experience in both qualitative and quantitative research methods. Currently, Dr. Gout is working with the VAWA Measuring Effectiveness Initiative, a national project that collaboratively develops measures of effectiveness and data collection instruments for agencies and organizations funded by the Office on Violence Against Women in the U.S. Department of Justice.

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HAAS, STEPHEN M. is Director of the West Virginia Statistical Analysis Center (SAC). Dr. Haas holds a B.A. in psychology and political science from The Ohio State University, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in criminal justice from the University of Cincinnati. He has served as Principal Investigator and Project Director on several state and federally funded research projects and evaluations. Dr. Haas has also published numerous research reports and academic papers on various topics in the field of criminology and criminal justice education. His recent work has centered on the use of core correctional practices in offender reentry, the deterrent capacity of media awareness campaigns designed to reduce gun crime, gun availability, and violent crime, the statistical accuracy of crime statistics, racial profiling, and the use of the Level of Service Inventory-Revised (LSI-R) in effective reentry case planning. Dr. Haas is a former G. Paul Sylvestre Award recipient and is a nationally recognized consultant and Master Trainer on the Level of Service/Case Management Inventory (LS/CMI).

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HART, BARBARA J. is the Director of Strategic Justice Initiatives in the Justice Policy Program of the Cutler Institute on Health and Social Policy of the Muskie School of Public Service. Ms. Hart is a Principal Investigator on the Violence Against Women Measuring Effectiveness Initiative (VAWA MEI) and Principal Investigator on the Building Economic Security for Survivors (BESS) Project. Her work includes public policy development, training, and technical assistance on a broad range of issues such as: advocacy; economic justice and security for survivors; systems to monitor batterer intervention programs; implementation of coordinated community intervention systems; development and critique of legislation; construction of court procedures and standards; consultation on impact litigation; and design of training curricula. She has served as a leader in the national efforts to implement the Violence Against Women Act. Ms. Hart hosts a series of monthly national/international audio conferences, designed to create discourse between prominent researchers and expert practitioners. Web libraries and MP3s are produced for the audio conferences. She writes a monthly column for the National Bulletin on Domestic Violence Prevention , a West-Thomson publication, and has authored and coauthored many articles on domestic violence, including: "State Codes on Domestic Violence: Analysis, Commentary and Recommendations"; "Model Code on Domestic and Family Violence"; "Safety and Accountability"; "The Underpinnings of a Just Justice System"; "Confronting Domestic Violence: Effective Police Response"; "Seeking Justice: Coordinated Justice System Intervention Against Domestic Violence"; "Safety for Women: Monitoring Batterers' Programs"; and "Accountability: Program Standards for Batterer Intervention Services."

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HASKELL, ANNE is serving her second two-year term as a state Representative from Portland. She previously served in the Maine House of Representatives from 1988 to 1994 representing Gorham, and served on the Corrections Select Committee. After that, she was a member of the senior staff for Governor Angus King, where she served as the Director of Appointments to Boards and Commissions. She also worked as the Chief Operating Officer for the Maine International Trade Center and was Communications Manager for the Finance Authority of Maine. During the past four years, Representative Haskell has been a member of the Criminal Justice and Public Safety Committee and was the House Chairman the last two years. The committee worked to accomplish the consolidation of the state prison system with the county jail system as well as other corrections system reforms. She was recently appointed co-chair of the Juvenile Justice Implementation Council to implement the recommendations of the Task Force created by the Chief Justice of the Maine Supreme Court and Maine's First Lady.

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HUGHES, ERICA has been a Research Analyst for the Illinois Criminal Justice Information Authority (ICJIA) since September 1998. She has done extensive research and has written reports on the nature and extent of college campus crime, juvenile delinquency, family violence, hate crime, and elder abuse. She also works extensively with U.S. Census Bureau data. Prior to moving to ICJIA, Ms. Hughes worked as a caseworker in a probation department and held internships in probation and law enforcement. Ms. Hughes is a member of several committees and often provides research-based information and state and county level data in order to facilitate discussion. She has also developed data collection instruments for several projects across Illinois and provides technical assistance to local practitioners that enhances their understanding and use of local data. In addition, she works extensively with Illinois' state administrative agency to provide data and information that assists with program evaluation, federal grant compliance, and strategic planning. Ms. Hughes has a bachelor's degree in human resources and family studies from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and a master's degree in criminal justice from the University of Illinois at Chicago.

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IWAMA, JANICE A. is a Research Analyst at the Justice Research and Statistics Association (JRSA). In the past, she has worked on research projects regarding disproportionate minority contact, domestic violence, and victim compensation assistance programs. Her work at JRSA currently involves research and analysis on various projects, including the Evaluation of Utah's Youth and Families with Promise Program, the Bureau of Justice Statistics' National Criminal History Records Improvement Program, and the Bureau of Justice Assistance Center for Program Evaluation and Performance Measurement. She received her M.S. in criminal justice from American University in Washington, DC.

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KELLAM, LESLIE has over 25 years of experience in criminal justice research and policy analysis in New York State. She has a strong working knowledge of the data systems and corresponding research files for New York State probation, parole, corrections, and alternatives to incarceration. Previously focused on sentencing and corrections, she is the author of numerous recidivism and outcome studies. Extensive experience in using operations databases to address research and policy questions has led to particular interest in cross-system analyses. Ms. Kellam is currently coordinating the state's interagency effort to assess the impact of New York's 2009 Drug Law Reforms.

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KERN, RICK is the Director of the Virginia Criminal Sentencing Commission, a judicial branch agency of the Commonwealth of Virginia. Previously, Dr. Kern was Director of the Virginia Criminal Justice Research Center, where he was responsible for the oversight and direction of criminal justice system research in Virginia. Dr. Kern also served as Research Director for the Governor's Commission on Parole Abolition and Sentence Reform. There, he directed research on sentencing and time-served patterns, offender recidivism and risk assessment, the development of computer simulation programs to estimate the correctional resource impact of parole abolition, and the development of truth-in-sentencing voluntary guidelines. Dr. Kern also served as Director of the Governor's Commission on Violent Crime and directed research on crime prevention strategies, gun control measures and their effectiveness, firearms transactions, evaluation of offender rehabilitation programs, and arrest, conviction, sentencing and time-served trends. Dr. Kern has twice been elected President of the national Justice Research and Statistics Association (JRSA). He serves as an Advisory Board Member of the State Sentencing and Corrections Program operated by the Vera Institute of Justice. Dr. Kern received his Ph.D. in criminology from Florida State University.

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KING, ERICA is a Policy Associate at the University of Southern Maine's Muskie School of Public Service. Ms. King evaluates correctional programs, provides training and technical assistance in evidence-based practices, and designs organizational and workforce development strategies in corrections, child welfare, and other public/human service systems. Ms. King provides leadership and project management in collaboration with state and nonprofit agencies for juvenile recidivism, gender responsive programming, disproportionate minority contact, correctional program effectiveness, and other areas. Trained in the CPAI-2000 by Dr. Don Andrews, she has led Maine's correctional program evaluation process for the past five years. She has worked extensively in partnership with the Maine Department of Corrections and jurisdictions across the U.S. and Canada to embed evidence-based practices throughout the organization (e.g., risk assessment, motivational interviewing, cognitive behavioral, gender responsive programming, correctional case management) and to more effectively measure their adherence to these practices, as well as the resulting outcomes. For over 15 years, Ms. King has been a leader in moving innovative programs forward to full implementation. She has provided training, coaching and technical assistance to thousands of direct line staff, supervisors, and policy makers across facility and community settings.

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KING, RYAN S. works on the Pew Center for the States' sentencing and corrections initiative, the Public Safety Performance Project. He was most recently a policy analyst at The Sentencing Project. He holds a master's degree in Justice, Law & Society from American University.

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KOEPPLINGER, SUZANNE is the Executive Director of the Minnesota Indian Women's Resource Center. She has a background in international project development, communications, domestic violence advocacy, and fundraising. Ms. Koepplinger serves on boards for the American Indian Community Development Corporation, ArtSpace, and the Greater Twin Cities United Way. Civic activities include serving on the Steering Committee of the Sheila Wellstone Institute and the FBI Civil Rights Advisory Group. Ms. Koepplinger is of European and Canadian Mohawk ancestry, holds a master's degree in the art of leadership from Augsburg College. She is the recipient of the Minneapolis FBI Director's Community Leadership Award, the 2008 Sheila Wellstone Gold Watch Award from WATCH, and the 2010 Ruby Award from Soroptimist International.

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KUTATELADZE, BESIKI serves as the Associate Research Director for the Prosecution and Racial Justice Program (PRJ). PRJ partners with prosecutorial jurisdictions across the United States to develop data collection and analysis tools that allow district attorneys to monitor and guard against racial bias in prosecutorial decision making. Dr. Kutateladze supervises PRJ's research staff and manages all aspects of research, including design, data analysis, project implementation, and report writing. He joined the Vera Institute in 2008 to work on the American Bar Association's World Justice Project. Between August 2008 and February 2010, he served as a Senior Research Associate for the International Indicators Group and played a crucial role in the development of the United Nations Rule of Law Indicators and their field testing in Haiti and Liberia. In addition, Dr. Kutateladze worked on the Police Station Visitors Week-conducted in 20 countries-and the Security Sector Reform project in the Democratic Republic of the Congo; both projects were funded by the United Kingdom Department for International Development. Prior to joining Vera, Dr. Kutateladze taught courses on comparative criminal justice and statistics at John Jay College of Criminal Justice. He earned his Ph.D. in criminal justice from the Graduate Center of the City University of New York and his master's degree in criminal justice from John Jay College of Criminal Justice. Dr. Kutateladze is also a jurist from the Republic of Georgia (Kutaisi State University) with post-graduate training in procedural criminal law (Tbilisi State University).

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LEE, CYNTHIA G.  is a Court Research Associate at the National Center for State Courts. Her projects include weighted caseload studies for judges, prosecutors, and public defenders, a program evaluation of the Red Hook Community Justice Center, the 2005 Civil Justice Survey of State Courts and Civil Trials on Appeal, the Court Statistics Project, and an empirical evaluation of the representativeness and accuracy of commercial jury verdict reports. Ms. Lee holds a J.D. from the William & Mary Law School and an M.P.P. from the Thomas Jefferson Program in Public Policy at the College of William & Mary.

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LORD, DENISE is the Associate Commissioner for the Department of Corrections. Her responsibilities include long-range planning and systems improvement, program development and evaluation, research and analysis of correctional programs and alternatives, state and federal legislative affairs, the department's technology and management information systems, and public relations and external affairs. She reports directly to the Commissioner, serves on the Governor's Children's Cabinet and the Sentencing and Correctional Practices Coordinating Council, and co-chairs the Board of Corrections Working Group.

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LOVE, CRAIG holds a Ph.D. in educational psychology from Temple University and is a Senior Study Director at Westat. Dr. Love serves as senior advisor to the Survey of Jails in Indian Country and the Tribal Crime Data Collection, Analysis, and Estimation Projects, both with the Bureau of Justice Statistics. He develops behavioral health promotion and treatment programs in Indian Country, and manages large and small evaluation projects on both Native American and criminal justice issues. Currently Dr. Love is working with the Tribal Leaders Council of Montana and Wyoming to implement a U.S. Health and Human Services Department-funded Access to Recovery program as well as a recently funded Treatment Capacity Expansion program that will result in the development of a residential facility. He also leads a nationwide evaluation of a SAMHSA-funded drug court program. Prior to joining Westat, Dr Love was Research Director and Regional Research Administrator in the Federal Prison System for nine years. He subsequently developed a Native American Studies curriculum for Brown University and conducted a variety of research projects on Native American and criminal justice topics at the medical schools of both Brown and Harvard Universities.

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LYNCH, JAMES is currently the Director of the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) in the United States Department of Justice. Previously he was a Distinguished Professor in the Department of Criminal Justice at John Jay College, City University of New York. He was a professor in the Department of Justice, Law and Society at American University from 1986 to 2005 and chair of the department from 2003 to 2005. He was the Vice-President Elect of the American Society of Criminology (ASC) and was previously on the Board of ASC as well as the Committee on Law and Justice Statistics of the American Statistical Association. Dr. Lynch has also served as co-editor of the Journal of Quantitative Criminology. From 2007 to 2009 he was a member of the National Academy of Science panel evaluating the programs of the Bureau of Justice Statistics. Dr. Lynch has published three books and numerous articles on crime statistics, victimization surveys, victimization risk, and the role of sanctions in social control. He received his B.A. degree from Wesleyan University and his M.A. and Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Chicago.

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MARUSCHAK, LAURA has been a Statistician with the Corrections Statistics Unit of the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) since 1996. Over the last 14 years, her work has focused primarily on health and healthcare among correctional populations. She has authored the annual bulletin on HIV infection beginning with the 1995 report and numerous other reports focusing on medical problems of inmates and treatment. She has led the redesign of health-related modules included in BJS's large-scale national surveys. Currently her work is focused on making enhancements to BJS data collections to ensure that relevant and reliable correctional health and healthcare data are being collected. Her work includes developing a strategy for the implementation of national data collections on correctional health and healthcare. She received her Master of Arts degree and Bachelor of Arts degree in criminology and criminal justice from the University of Maryland, College Park.

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MCDEVITT, JACK is the Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Studies at the College of Criminal Justice at Northeastern University. He also directs the Institute on Race and Justice and the Center for Criminal Justice Policy Research. Dr. McDevitt is the coauthor of three books, Hate Crimes: The Rising Tide of Bigotry and Bloodshed, Hate Crime Revisited: American War on Those Who Are Different (both with Jack Levin), and Victimology (with Judy Sgarzy). He is presently leading a team providing technical assistance and evaluation support to the Shannon Community Safety Initiative, an $11 million statewide effort to reduce gang violence in Massachusetts. He has also coauthored a number of reports on racial profiling, including a monograph for the U.S. Department of Justice and statewide reports from Rhode Island and Massachusetts on the levels of disparity in traffic enforcement. Dr. McDevitt is Co-Principal Investigator with Dr. Amy Farrell of a national evaluation of the recent Police Integrity Initiative of the U.S. Department of Justice's Office of Community Orientated Policing Services (COPS). He has trained thousands of law enforcement officials over the past 25 years, most recently in conjunction with the New England Regional Community Policing Institute. Over this period, he has published numerous articles on a wide variety of topics in criminal justice. He has spoken on hate crimes, racial profiling, and security both nationally and internationally, and has testified as an expert witness before the Judiciary Committees of both U.S. Senate and the U.S. House of Representatives, and as invited expert at the White House.

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MCMANUS, ROB has worked with the South Carolina Department of Public Safety's Statistical Analysis Center (SAC) since 1992 and has served as SAC Director since 1995. In that role, he has participated in research initiatives concerning domestic violence, gang violence, sexual violence, illegal drug use and other areas of concern. He has served as research partner to the South Carolina District United States Attorney for Project Safe Neighborhoods since 2002. Previously, he worked in research and evaluation with the S.C. Department of Probation and Parole for 10 years, and earlier was a program evaluator with the Governor's Office of Criminal Justice Programs. He is currently serving as co-editor of the Justice Research and Policy journal and has served on the JRSA Executive Committee. He received a master's degree in criminal justice from the University of South Carolina and a bachelor's degree from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

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MONAHAN, KAREN is a Research Associate at the Cutler Institute for Health and Social Policy at the Muskie School of Public Service in Portland, Maine. Ms. Monahan serves on the management team of the VAWA Measuring Effectiveness Initiative (VAWA MEI), a technical assistance project that develops reporting forms, provides training and technical assistance on reporting, and analyzes and reports on the activities and effectiveness of all Office on Violence Against Women-funded formula and discretionary grant programs. Ms. Monahan oversees all project activities related to the STOP Violence against Women and Legal Assistance for Victims grant programs. She has extensive experience evaluating programs and initiatives for state courts and for legal service organizations, and in assisting nonprofits in performance measurement. Ms. Monahan's background is in legal services and civil litigation.

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MYRENT, MARK serves as Associate Director for the Illinois Criminal Justice Information Authority, where he oversees the Research and Analysis Unit. He previously worked as Research Director for the Cook County Juvenile Court, conducting studies of juvenile detention alternatives and mental health screening of court-involved youth. Prior to that, he worked for more than 20 years at the Authority as a senior research analyst and Illinois Integrated Justice Information System (IIJIS) project manager. He is the author of numerous publications on criminal justice strategic planning, juvenile justice trends, disproportionate minority contact, computerized access to criminal history records, victim assistance programs, and jail crowding. He has also served as an adjunct faculty member at the Chicago campuses of both Loyola University and the University of Illinois.

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NAPIER, JESSICA S.  holds both B.A. and M.S. degrees in criminal justice from Marshall University. During her college career, she was an active member of Lambda Alpha Epsilon (Marshall's Criminal Justice Fraternity), and Alpha Omega Chapter and Alpha Phi Sigma (the National Criminal Justice Honor Society), Omega Gamma Chapter. As a graduate assistant at Marshall University, she conducted a content analysis examining the occurrence of plagiarism among undergraduate students, and conducted a self-administered survey assessing differences in traditional and nontraditional students in relation to study habits, grades, organizational participation, and other factors. Ms. Napier also worked for the Child Assault Prevention Program through the Team for West Virginia Children. She is currently a Research Analyst at the West Virginia Criminal Justice Analysis Center, where she is analyzing the results of a survey of criminal history records officers and court clerks that explores a host of policy and procedural factors that are likely to impact the accurate and timely submission of records to the central repository. She is also completing a study that examines the likelihood of sexual and nonsexual victimization over the life course using West Virginia Incident-Based Reporting System (WVIBRS) data as well as concentrating on other projects related to the statistical accuracy of crime reports submitted to the incident-based reporting system in West Virginia.

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NEITCH, MICHELLE is a Research Analyst for the Arizona Criminal Justice Commission's Statistical Analysis Center and has conducted criminal justice research for seven years. Examples of her work include research participation in the Arizona Arrestee Reporting Information Network project (the local version of ADAM, the Arrestee Drug Abuse Monitoring program) and conducting independent research on the influence of gender as a mediator for predicting alcohol use. Ms. Neitch has been the project manager of the Arizona Youth Survey since 2006. Her role as project manager includes survey design, school recruitment, administration, and data analysis. Additionally, Ms. Neitch has worked on projects examining the threat of gangs in Arizona, as well as examining crime data on tribal lands in Arizona. She is also a member of the Arizona Underage Drinking Committee-a subcommittee of the Arizona Substance Abuse Partnership. She received her B.S. and M.A. degrees from the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Arizona State University.

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NOONAN, MARGARET is a Statistician with the Department of Justice's Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS). Prior to joining BJS, Ms. Noonan worked on issues of school crime as a contractor for the U.S. Department of Education. At BJS, Ms. Noonan is Program Manager of the Deaths in Custody Reporting Program (DCRP). The DCRP collects death records from 50 state prisons and approximately 3,000 local jails annually. Ms. Noonan also works on issues involving incarcerated veterans.

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NORÉUS, REBECCA, M.P.P.M., is a Research Analyst at the University of Southern Maine's Muskie School of Public Service. Ms. Noréus works primarily on juvenile justice research, analyzing juvenile data provided by the Maine Department of Corrections (MDOC) and reporting trends in the state. In 2007, she coauthored the Maine Division of Juvenile Services Annual Recidivism Report, and will author the updated (2006-2008) Annual Recidivism Report to be released in late 2010. Ms. Noréus also contributes to Maine's Disproportionate Minority Contact (DMC) research and is the lead author of the 2009 Maine DMC Report. She continues to monitor DMC trends in the state, and contributes to other DMC research activities, such as exploring factors that contribute to DMC in Maine. Ms. Noréus recognizes the importance of data in demonstrating program effectiveness, and works with organizations to develop evaluation strategies and build capacity to use data to measure outcomes through training and technical assistance. She has helped numerous community organizations to develop their own logic models, evaluation plans, and data collection instruments. Currently she is working with the MDOC Division of Juvenile Services Continuous Quality Improvement Council to define outcomes and develop indicators and measures to monitor performance.

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OLSON, DAVID currently serves as Professor and Chair of the Criminal Justice Department at Loyola University Chicago, and as the Research Coordinator for the Cook County Sheriff's Office of Reentry Policy through an agreement between Loyola and the Sheriff's Office. For nearly 20 years, Dr. Olson worked at the Illinois Criminal Justice Information Authority, where he was a Senior Scientist and directed Illinois' Statewide Drug and Violent Crime Control Strategy Impact Evaluation Program. Dr. Olson has served as staff to numerous statewide commissions in Illinois, including the Governor's Task Force on Crime and Corrections, the Legislative Committee on Juvenile Justice, the Truth-in-Sentencing Commission, the Governor's Community Safety and Prisoner Re-Entry Management Commission, and the Capital Punishment Reform Study Committee. He was recently appointed by the Illinois Governor to separate five-year terms on the Illinois Department of Juvenile Justice and the Illinois Department of Corrections Advisory Boards. Dr. Olson received his B.S. in criminal justice from Loyola University Chicago, his M.A. in criminal justice from the University of Illinois at Chicago, and his Ph.D. in political science/public policy analysis from the University of Illinois at Chicago, where he was the recipient of the Assistant United States Attorney General's Graduate Research Fellowship.

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ORWIN, ROBERT G. is a Principal Investigator and Senior Study Director with 30 years of experience in program evaluation and 18 years of experience in the issues of homelessness, mental health, and substance abuse prevention, treatment, and policy. His expertise includes evaluation and survey research, research design, and data analysis. Dr. Orwin has directed research projects for the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, the National Institute on Drug Abuse, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, the Food and Drug Administration, and various other agencies. He has directed or co-directed several multisite and cross-site evaluations. He has published more than 30 articles and book chapters.

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PRZYBYLSKI, ROGER is a consultant and founder of RKC Group, a private consulting company that provides applied research and evaluation services to public and private sector organizations. Prior to forming RKC Group in 1997, Mr. Przybylski served as Associate Director for the Illinois Criminal Justice Information Authority, where he directed the authority's research division. He also has served as Coordinator of Research for the Chicago Police Department. Mr. Przybylski is a past president of JRSA and current chairman of the American Evaluation Association's crime and justice interest group. He has been an adjunct faculty member at Loyola University and the University of Illinois-Chicago. He also has served as staff to the Illinois Legislative Committee on Juvenile Justice, the Governor's Commission on Gangs in Illinois, and the Illinois Task Force on Crime and Corrections. Mr. Przybylski conducts training on evaluation and evidence-based programming across the country. He recently authored the publication "What Works: Effective Recidivism Reduction and Risk-Focused Prevention Programs - A Compendium of Evidence-Based Options for Preventing New and Persistent Criminal Behavior." His recent consulting work includes projects for the Administrative Office of the Illinois Courts, the Institute for Intergovernmental Research, the Colorado Judicial Department, and the Rutherford County (Tennessee) Drug Court.

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PYROOZ, DAVID C. is a doctoral student in the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Arizona State University. He received a B.S. (2005) and M.S. (2007) in criminology from California State University, Fresno. His research interests revolve around gangs and deviant networks, life course criminology, violent crime, and the intersection between theory and policy. He has coauthored articles that appear or are forthcoming in Crime and Delinquency, Criminal Justice Policy Review, Journal of Criminal Justice, Justice Quarterly, and Journal of International Migration and Integration.

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RAMKER, GERRY is Deputy Director of the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) in the Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice. In this role, he oversees the Statistical Planning, Policy, and Operations Division, which includes the Planning, Management, and Budget Office; the Criminal Justice Data Improvement Program; and, the Publications and Dissemination Unit. Dr. Ramker joined BJS in October 2004. He came to Washington after a 20-year career working for the Illinois Criminal Justice Information Authority in Chicago, where he directed the Authority's Research and Analysis Unit, the state's Statistical Analysis Center. He also worked for the Illinois State Police directing program development efforts, research, and evaluation projects for the Division of Forensic Services and Identification. He completed undergraduate studies in sociology and mathematics at St. Joseph's College (Indiana), and holds a master's degree in criminology from Indiana State University (Terre Haute, IN) and a Ph.D. in criminal justice from Sam Houston State University (Huntsville, TX).

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RAND, MICHAEL R. is Chief of Victimization Statistics at the U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS), where he oversees the collection of data related to crime and victimization, including the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS), one of the two leading crime indicators in the United States. Mr. Rand began his career at the Census Bureau in 1972 and has been at the U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics since 1978. He has directed the Victimization Statistics Branch at BJS since 1995, and is now taking the lead in a reevaluation and redesign of the survey's methodology to ensure that it will meet future needs for information on crime and victims. Mr. Rand is the author or coauthor of several published articles and BJS reports on the extent and nature of crime victimization and crime's impact on victims. Most recently he coauthored a report on victimization of people with disabilities. He has also provided technical assistance in the area of victimization statistics to the United Nations and nations developing criminal justice statistical programs.

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RUBIN, MARK is a Research Associate with the Justice Policy Program at the Muskie School of Public Service. He currently supervises Maine's involvement in the JRSA Parole Revocation Study and is conducting a case study for the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) measuring the diffusion of evidence-based practices in probation and post-supervision in Maine. Prior to working in Maine, Mr. Rubin served as Director of Research and Neighborhood Information Services at DC Agenda, a nonprofit intermediary in Washington, DC. He was also previously a Research Associate at the Urban Institute in the Metropolitan Housing and Community Development Center, where his research focused on economic development and housing challenges for low-income residents. Mr. Rubin received a bachelor's degree in international relations from Johns Hopkins University and a master's in urban planning from Columbia University.

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RUSER, JOHN W. has served as Assistant Commissioner for Safety, Health and Working Conditions at the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics since November, 2006. He is responsible for the Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries, the Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses and special surveys. Prior to his current position, Dr. Ruser was Associate Director for Regional Economics at the Bureau of Economic Analysis, U.S. Department of Commerce from 2002 to 2006 and was a researcher on compensation and working conditions at the Bureau of Labor Statistics from 1984 to 2002. Dr. Ruser has written articles on workplace risk and insurance that have appeared in a number of economics and public health journals. He has also authored nontechnical articles and book chapters on income measurement, compensation, and working conditions. Dr. Ruser holds Ph.D. and M.A. degrees in economics from the University of Chicago and a B.A. in economics from Princeton University.

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SABOL, WILLIAM J. directs the Corrections Statistics Program at the Bureau of Justice Statistics, which describes and measures change in the nation's correctional populations and correctional facilities. Using a combination of agency-level surveys, administrative records, and inmate surveys, the Program reports annually on changes in corrections populations; produces periodic special topic reports; and reports regularly on Congressionally mandated topics such as deaths in custody. Dr. Sabol has more than 20 years' experience researching criminal justice issues in different settings, including the Government Accountability Office, Case Western Reserve University, the Urban Institute, and the University of Maryland. His research efforts over the years have focused primarily on criminal justice and corrections policy issues. Prior to completing his Ph.D. in 1988 from the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs at the University of Pittsburgh, he was a Fulbright Scholar at the Institute of Criminology at Cambridge University.

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SALO, THERESA is Deputy Commissioner of the Office of Justice Research and Performance for the New York State Division of Criminal Justice Services (DCJS) and she also serves as the Statistical Analysis Center Director. She has been involved in criminal justice policy and research for more than 20 years. Prior to joining DCJS, she served as the Director of Policy Analysis at the Division of Parole. Ms. Salo began her state career at the State Division of Budget, where she had oversight responsibility for numerous criminal justice agencies.

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SAMUELS, JULIE is a Senior Fellow at the Urban Institute, where she is currently working on projects related to the federal justice system, including an examination of tribal youth, as well as research regarding DNA collection from juvenile offenders and arrestees. Ms. Samuels has more than 25 years of experience in policy analysis and research on crime and justice issues gained during her tenure with the U.S. Department of Justice. While at the Justice Department, Ms. Samuels held numerous policy and management positions. Most recently, from 2001-2007, she was the Director of the Criminal Division's Office of Policy and Legislation and served as the Acting Director of the National Institute of Justice from 2000-2001. While at the Department of Justice, Ms. Samuels directed projects examining a wide variety of issues, including: sentencing and corrections policy; youth violence and juvenile justice; and drug trafficking and violent crime. Ms. Samuels earned her master's in public policy at the Graduate School of Public Policy, University of California at Berkeley.

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SCHUBERT, CAROL A.,  M.P.H., is a researcher for the Law and Psychiatry Program at the University of Pittsburgh. In her 25-year career, Ms. Schubert has coordinated several large-scale projects regarding the assessment of violence risk and provision of services to mentally ill, violent individuals as well as factors related to desistance from crime as serious adolescent offenders make the transition to adulthood. Ms. Schubert has done an array of research-related activities from direct data collection to data analysis, has supervised the integration of large scale administrative and research databases and has published numerous academic articles.

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SHATTUCK, ANNE is a Research Associate at the University of New Hampshire's (UNH's) Crimes Against Children Research Center (CCRC). Her work at CCRC focuses on exploring patterns of crimes against juveniles and associations between juvenile crime victimization and outcomes such as mental health and juvenile delinquency. Before joining CCRC, she worked as a researcher at the Carsey Institute at UNH. Ms. Shattuck holds an undergraduate degree from Georgetown University and a master's degree from UNH. She is currently a Ph.D. candidate in sociology at UNH.

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SHOAF, LISA CONTOS has been with the Ohio Office of Criminal Justice Services since 2002. As a Research Analyst, she was responsible for conducting and reviewing evaluations of Ohio's criminal justice programs, including a process evaluation of the Akron Mental Health Court and a study of the Akron Weed and Seed program. Dr. Shoaf became Statistical Analysis Center Director in 2004. Her primary responsibilities as SAC Director are to facilitate access to criminal justice statistics and to generate statistical reports and publications. She has collaborated with multiple state and federal agencies on information sharing projects such as the National Violent Death Reporting System and the Death in Custody Reporting Program. Most recently, she and her colleagues have been involved in a multi-city effort to implement a crime reduction initiative based on the Boston Ceasefire strategy. Dr. Shoaf received her education from The Ohio State University, where she received a B.S. in psychology in 1993 and an M.A. in psychology in 1997. She received a Ph.D. in 2002 in cognitive psychology.

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SNYDER, HOWARD N. is the Chief of the Recidivism, Reentry and Special Projects Unit at the Bureau of Justice Statistics. The unit is implementing a new protocol for mining the recidivism data housed in the criminal history repositories and other administrative data sets to reduce the cost of recidivism research and increase BJS's ability to conduct recidivism studies. The unit is also responsible for the Federal Justice Statistics Program and the analysis of data flowing from the FBI's Uniform Crime Reporting Program. Prior to joining BJS, he served as Director of Systems Research at the National Center for Juvenile Justice from 1981 until his resignation in 2008. He founded the National Juvenile Court Data Archive and served as its Director for over 25 years. In 1989 he began an effort that functioned for nearly 20 years as the Nation's statistical analysis center on juvenile crime and justice topics. He was honored in 2004 for his lifetime contribution to research by the American Correctional Association with its Peter P. Lejins Research Award and in 2010 by the American Society of Criminology with its August Vollmer Award for his contributions to the field of criminology.

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STRICKLAND, SHAUNA M. is a Senior Court Research Analyst within the Research Division of the National Center for State Courts (NCSC). She currently works on the Court Statistics Project as the manager of data collection efforts and assists both trial and appellate courts with implementation of the State Court Guide to Statistical Reporting. She is also serving as project manager for the next edition of State Court Organization and primary staff on the NICS Improvement Amendments Act: State Records Estimates Development and Validation Project. Previously, Ms. Strickland was project manager for the 2005 Civil Justice Survey of State Courts: Supplemental Survey of Civil Appeals and was involved in data collection for three Civil Justice Surveys of State Courts, a pilot study of Criminal Cases on Appeal, and State Court Organization,2004, where she led the data collection efforts. Ms. Strickland contributes to the Court Statistics Project's annual publication, Examining the Work of State Courts and State Court Caseload Statistics, and has co-authored articles on judicial decision making in mental health courts, civil justice, and trial trends in state courts. She holds an M.P.A. from Old Dominion University (VA) and has worked at the NCSC since 2002.

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VANDERCOOK, JACKIE is the Statistics Assistant Director with the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation. She serves as the manager of Tennessee's state National Incident Based Reporting System (NIBRS) program for Tennessee and as the director of the state's Statistical Analysis Center (SAC) for criminal justice. She has worked at TBI since 1991, when she began the SAC. The SAC began implementation of the state NIBRS program in 1996, and achieved NIBRS certification with the FBI in 1998 and 100% statewide reporting in 2000. Ms. Vandercook is the current president of JRSA and is a past president of ASUCRP. She is currently providing support to the Tennessee Fusion System and is the state's point of contact for implementation of the FBI's Law Enforcement National Data Exchange (N-DEx) program. Prior to beginning her work at TBI, she worked for six years at the state Department of Correction in the planning and research section. Ms. Vandercook earned a bachelor's and a master's degree from the University of Tennessee.

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WAMBEAM, RODNEY A. is a Senior Research Scientist at the Wyoming Survey & Analysis Center (WYSAC) of the University of Wyoming (UW). He is also an adjunct professor in the Department of Political Science at UW. Dr. Wambeam completed his Ph.D. at the University of Nebraska - Lincoln in 1999 and served as policy advisor to Nebraska Governor Ben Nelson. He was Director of the Evaluation Research Department at the Nebraska Council to Prevent Alcohol and Drug Abuse before moving home to Wyoming in 2002. At WYSAC, Dr. Wambeam oversees numerous criminal justice and substance abuse prevention research projects. He was principal investigator of Wyoming's 21st Century State Incentive Grant evaluation and is currently principal investigator of Wyoming's Federal Prevention Block Grant and Strategic Prevention Framework State Incentive Grant evaluations. He facilitates the State Epidemiological Workgroup for Substance Abuse Prevention and is a member of Wyoming's State Advisory Council for Substance Abuse Prevention. At UW, he coordinates the certification program in Policy Analysis and Program Evaluation. In his free time he is an avid trail runner, is the coach of Wyoming's only short track ice speed skating team (which he founded), has been known to organize Muggle Quidditch games for youth, and cheers for the Washington Nationals.

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WERHOLTZ, ROGER was appointed Secretary of Corrections on in September 2002. He had served as Deputy Secretary of Corrections since 1987. He came to the department in 1982 after working as the first director of the Wyandotte County Community Corrections Program in Kansas City, Kansas. He also has experience in community mental health, child protective services, and substance abuse treatment and prevention. He has served as a graduate-level instructor in the University of Kansas School of Social Welfare. Mr. Werholtz also serves on numerous state criminal justice and human services boards and committees. In 1998, he was recognized as the outstanding alumnus of the University of Kansas School of Social Welfare. He was named a 2005 Toll Fellow by the Council of State Governments and received the Michael Franke Award from the Association of State Correctional Administrators in recognition as the outstanding correctional administrator in the United States for 2009. He has been a volunteer in scouting and youth athletics. He holds a master's degree in social work from the University of Kansas and graduated cum laude with a B.A. from Washburn University.

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WILSON, MICHAEL is an economist for the Oregon Criminal Justice Commission and the state's Statistical Analysis Center (SAC) Director. Mr. Wilson received his bachelor's and master's degrees in economics from the University of California at San Diego, where he also worked as a research analyst. He was also an adjunct faculty member at Point Loma Nazarene University. Before being named SAC Director, he was an economist for the Oregon Employment Department.

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WING, JANEENA J.  is the Director of the Statistical Analysis Center in Idaho, housed within the Idaho State Police. Her most recent research includes an evaluation of the Building Healthy Relationships course taught to female survivors of domestic violence as well as utilization of the Idaho Incident Based Reporting System (IIBRS) for a report on victims of crime. Ms. Wing has also worked on police allocation modeling for the state police, evaluations of STOP (Services, Training, Officers, and Prosecutors)- and Byrne/Justice Assistance Grant (JAG)-funded programs, examining drug and alcohol arrests in Idaho using IIBRS data, and a statewide crime victimization survey. She serves on various committees within the state of Idaho helping to inform on drug trends and domestic violence throughout the state. Ms. Wing received her M.A. in sociology from Idaho State University and is currently working towards her doctorate in psychology: research, evaluation and measurement through the University of the Rockies.

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WRIGHT, DAVID serves as the Evaluation Projects Manager in Decision Support Services for the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services. The responsibilities of this position involve performing research, statistical analysis, and evaluation supporting the Substance Abuse Mental Health Services Administration's Mental Health Transformation State Incentive Grant, the Co-Occurring State Incentive Grant, Adult and Juvenile Drug Courts, DUI Courts, Mental Health Courts, Jail Diversion Programs, and Prison Re-Entry Programs. Prior to this position, Dr. Wright served as the Director of the Oklahoma Statistical Analysis Center and Director of Research at the Oklahoma Criminal Justice Resource Center. He has received numerous awards and honors for his research publications. Dr. Wright received his Ph.D. in political science from the University of Houston, after receiving his master's degree at Oklahoma State University and his bachelor's degree at Southwestern Oklahoma State University.

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YEARWOOD, DOUGLAS L. is the Director of the North Carolina Criminal Justice Analysis Center. In addition to governmental reports, he has published articles and book reviews in Justice Research and Policy, The British Journal of Criminology, Journal of Art Crime, Criminal Justice Policy Review, Journal of Family Violence, American Journal of Police, Critical Criminology, Children and Youth Services Review, Journal of Gang Research, Journal of Community Corrections, Law Enforcement Executive Forum, Criminal Justice Research Report, F.B.I. Law Enforcement Bulletin, The Criminologist, Federal Probation, Police Chief, and American Jails. He is coauthor, with James Klopovic and Michael Vasu, of the book Effective Program Practices for At-Risk Youth: A Continuum of Community-Based Programs, published by the Civic Research Institute. He is a past President of the Justice Research and Statistics Association.

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