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For more detailed information, please select a state from the State Information page.



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Alabama

Domestic Violence Legislation:Yes (13A-6-130)
NIBRS Status:Developing
Additional IBR Elements:Yes
Law Enforcement DV System:Incident-Based
Service Provider DV System:Incident-Based
Service Provider SA System:Incident-Based

The State of Alabama does have legislation in place defining domestic violence in the state, including same-sex romantic relationships. The Alabama Criminal Justice Information Center currently collects incident-based crime data from local law enforcement agencies, but the state has not been certified by the FBI. As a result, only summary counts of data are currently available at the national level. Alabama does collect two additional data elements that may pertain to domestic violence and sexual assault offenses: (1) whether a rape exam has been conducted and (2) whether the victim received treatment for an injury. Alabama has also expanded their location codes. In addition to the NIBRS data elements, location codes include:

  • victim's car
  • offender's car
  • victim's residence
  • offender's residence
  • apartment complex
  • vacant lot
  • vacant house/building
  • dirt road
  • residence of friend/relative of offender
  • residence of friend/relative of victim
  • trailer park
  • hospital
  • railroad tracks
  • prison/corrections facility
  • cemetery
  • lake/beach

The Alabama Coalition Against Domestic Violence collects information from its 18 member shelter organizations and statewide hotline using a networked system called Alice. Although Alice has been developed for national use, the Coalition has expanded the system to collect additional information. Additional information includes data from Project SAIL (Special Assessment Intervention and Liaison) and Cut It Out Program. Through Project SAIL, a domestic violence specialist is placed in the Department of Human Resources offices to screen clients for possible domestic violence. Cut It Out, now a national organization funded by the Salons Against Domestic Abuse Fund, trains salon professionals to recognize domestic violence indicators and refer clients to available resources, where needed.

The Alabama Department of Public Health's Injury Prevention Division collects information from 15 rape crisis centers in the state. The member centers complete forms via a Microsoft ACCESS program as part of the Department's Medquest system. Data are collected monthly and are included in an annual report. The Alabama Coalition Against Rape does not collect information but does provide public information and support to local crisis centers.

Since Alabama has a separate domestic violence offense statute, the Alabama Sentencing Commission is able to track domestic violence as well as sexual assault charges through the court database. Although some offenses that could be charged as domestic violence are instead being charged as assault, the domestic violence charges are included in the Commission's yearly report listing the 25 offenses most often charged each year.

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Alaska

Domestic Violence Legislation: Yes (18.66.990)
NIBRS Status:No Planned Involvement
Law Enforcement DV System:No
Service Provider DV System:Incident-Based
Service Provider SA System:Incident-Based

Alaska does have domestic violence legislation that includes same-sex relationships. The state does not currently collect incident-based data and plans to continue to collect only summary data. There is no state domestic violence or sexual assault law enforcement data collection. A database of protection orders is maintained by the Department of Public Safety in its Central Registry of Protective Orders. All law enforcement agencies with access to the state system have access to the Registry.

The Council on Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault collects incident-based information from all 24 shelters in the state using a standard data collection form coupled with direct entry into an automated database. The database, designed by the University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, collects victim, incident, offender, and medical information. The Council also collects information on the services offered to clients in the state shelters.

The Forensic Nurses Association of Alaska has just begun collecting data from the 11 Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner and Sexual Assault Response Teams in the state. The forms, also designed by the Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, collect information about each incident in instances where victims seek or are referred for medical treatment. These forms are then sent to the Forensic Nurses Association and entered into a database. Funded by the National Institutes of Justice, the Association plans to share the database with each team for direct data entry. It also plans to produce reports and conduct research with the information collected.

The Council on Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault will share data in aggregate form upon request, as will the Forensic Nurses Association of Alaska. The Alaska State Troopers (see below) will accept requests, which will be evaluated by staff.

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Arizona

Domestic Violence Legislation:Yes (13-3601)
NIBRS Status:Certified
Additional IBR Elements:No
Law Enforcement DV System:Incident-Based
Service Provider DV System:No
Service Provider SA System:No

Arizona does have domestic violence legislation that involves partners who are currently living together or have lived together in the past. Although Arizona is NIBRS certified, only three agencies are submitting data. As a result, there is no state-level law enforcement domestic violence data collection effort and only aggregate counts of sexual assaults are available. In an effort to collect information, the Governor's Division for Women surveyed law enforcement agencies about domestic violence incidents occurring in 2002. Almost 90% of agencies responded to the survey. The information was analyzed by the Division and a summary has been posted on its Web site.

The Arizona Criminal Justice Commission's Crime Victim Services unit collects information from victims applying for assistance. The form includes a check-box to indicate whether the incident is domestic. These results are published in annual reports available on its Web site.

The Arizona Coalition Against Domestic Violence provides public information and training for advocates, but does not collect information from shelters in the state. The Coalition does compile a Domestic Violence Fatality List; the information for the list is gathered from newspapers and information volunteered from the public and other groups.

The Governor's Office for Children, Youth and Families' Division for Women collects the number of domestic violence incidents that are reported to law enforcement. Law enforcement agencies, on a voluntary basis, submit forms to the Division quarterly for inclusion in an annual report.

The Department of Public Safety also collects some information from law enforcement. As agencies submit arrestee fingerprint cards, a checkbox indicates those involved in domestic incidents. This information is also paired with conviction data. Currently, these data are not used in any publications but are released upon request. The agency also manages the pdf document state Violence Against Crime Act (VOCA) grants, which fund 25 of the 28 women's shelters in the state. A survey of these agencies is completed yearly, but the information collected focuses mostly on the types of services provided. Statistical information on the clients seen is captured at yearly site visits.

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Arkansas

Domestic Violence Legislation:Yes (9-15-103)
NIBRS Status:Certified
Additional IBR Elements:No
Law Enforcement DV System:Incident-Based
Service Provider DV System:Summary
Service Provider SA System:Summary

The state does have domestic violence legislation that includes same-sex relationships. NIBRS data and summary data are collected by the Arkansas Crime Information Center. Agencies that submit summary data do not report any additional domestic or sexual violence incident information. The Arkansas Coalition Against Domestic Violence collects quarterly summary information from 28 shelter members, which is submitted through an online form. The data are not published but are available upon request. The Arkansas Coalition Against Sexual Assault does not collect data but does receive a copy of the data submitted by ten of the twelve rape crisis centers in the state. All of the agencies are required to submit statistics to the Department of Finance and Administration.

The Department of Finance and Administration Office of Intergovernmental Services Victim Justice and Assistance Program collects summary counts of victims of domestic abuse, sexual assault, and stalking from hotlines, shelters, courts, law enforcement agencies, prosecutors, and service providers that receive grant funds. Data are not published in reports but are available upon request. The Health and Human Services Office of Community Services also collects summary data from emergency shelters receiving grant funds. The information is published in annual reports. The Arkansas Commission on Child Abuse, Rape, and Domestic Violence does not collect service statistics, but rather collects information on the number and type of trainings provided to service providers and the community.

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California

Domestic Violence Legislation:Yes (Family Code 6209-6211)
NIBRS Status:Testing
Additional Data ElementsYes
Law Enforcement DV System:Incident-based
Service Provider DV System:Limited Summary and Incident-based
Service Provider SA System:Limited Summary and Incident-based

The state's domestic violence legislation does include same-sex relationships. Although the state is not NIBRS-certified, the Office of the Attorney General's Department of Justice is collecting incident-based data. For the testing phase, 26 additional data elements are being collected, including:

  • California Offense Code - Mandatory
  • Latitude - Optional
  • Longitude - Optional
  • Day of the Week - Optional (Hate Crime Only)
  • Offensive Symbols/Words/Acts - Optional (Hate Crime Only)
  • Victim Connected to California CJIS Code - Mandatory
  • Type of Activity Circumstance - Mandatory (Law Enforcement Officer Killed or Assaulted (LEOKA) Only)
  • Assignment Type - Mandatory (LEOKA Only)
  • ORI (Agency Identifier) - Other Jurisdiction - Mandatory (LEOKA Only)
  • Domestic Violence-Related - Mandatory
  • Victim Last Name - Mandatory (Hate Crime/Homicide)
  • Victim First Name - Mandatory (Hate Crime/Homicide)
  • Victim Middle Name - Optional
  • Victim Organization/Affiliation - Optional
  • Victim Date of Birth - Optional
  • Offender Last Name - Optional
  • Offender First Name - Optional
  • Offender Middle Name - Optional
  • Offender Date of Birth - Optional
  • Offender Organization/Affiliation - Optional
  • California Arrest Offense CJIS Code - Mandatory
  • Arrestee Date of Birth - Mandatory
  • Law Enforcement Disposition of Arrestee - Mandatory
  • Arrestee Last Name - Mandatory
  • Arrestee First Name - Mandatory
  • Arrestee Middle Name - Optional

In addition to collecting incident-based crime data for the Crimes and Clearances database, the Department of Justice maintains sixteen databases, several related to domestic and sexual violence. Each require law enforcement to submit separate information, either electronically or by using standard report forms. Most notable is the Domestic Violence-Related Calls for Assistance database, which collects monthly summary statistical data on the total number of domestic violence-related calls received by law enforcement. Data collected include the number of cases involving weapons and the type of weapon used during the incident. Domestic and sexual violence information can also be retrieved from the Monthly Arrest and Citation Register, which provides information on felony and misdemeanor level arrests for adults and juveniles. The Offender-Based Transaction Statistics data can be used to find the final disposition, while the Violent Crimes Committed Against Senior Citizens database includes information on victims 60 years of age and older. The Department of Justice also maintains the California Restraining and Protective Order System, accessible to all law enforcement and court agencies, as well as agencies that sell firearms. All data are available upon request.

Neither the California Partnership to End Domestic Violence nor the California Coalition Against Sexual Assault collect any data from service providers. Instead, the California Emergency Management Agency Law Enforcement and Victim Services Division collects information from grantees through various reporting programs. These include:

The California Women's Health Survey, a project of the California Department of Health Services, California Department of Mental Health, California Department of Alcohol and Drug Programs, California Department of Social Services, Lumetra, and the Public Health Institute, is an annual survey of women in the state. In addition to demographic and health questions, the survey includes sexual assault questions and a domestic violence module. The results are published in a report available from the California Department of Health Services Office of Women's Health. Data are available upon request.

The Department of Health Services has also teamed up with the University of California, San Francisco Center on Social Disparities in Health to conduct the Maternal and Infant Health Assessment. Although the purpose of the assessment is to develop and evaluate health policies and programs, sexual and domestic violence questions are often included.

The Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development Medical Information Reporting for California (MIRCal) collects both discharge and emergency room data from approximately 460 hospitals licensed by the state using an online incident-based data collection system. The system collects information on the cause of the injury, including sexual trauma. The Department of Health Services Domestic Violence Section provides funding to local programs and collects aggregate counts of women seeking services.

The Victim's Compensation and Government Claims Board collects limited information from victims applying for compensation. Relationship information is not collected, so only sexual assault information can be gathered from these forms. The information is provided in an annual report, which breaks out the number of applications by crime type.

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Colorado

Domestic Violence Legislation:Yes (18-6-800.3)
NIBRS Status:Certified
Additional Data ElementsYes
Law Enforcement DV System:Incident-based
Service Provider DV System:Summary
Service Provider SA System:Summary

The state's domestic violence legislation does include same-sex relationships. The state is certified by the FBI to submit NIBRS data and additional data elements are collected. Law enforcement agencies submit data to the Colorado Department of Public Safety Bureau of Investigation; these data are then used in the annual state crime report. Approximately 70% of the state's local law enforcement agencies report incident-based data to the state; the other agencies do not report any additional domestic or sexual violence information. The Bureau also maintains the state database of protection orders. Stalking data are not collected but are instead combined with intimidation incidents.

The Colorado Coalition Against Sexual Assault does not provide services nor does it collect any information; rather, the Coalition provides training and services to its member organizations. Like most states, service providers submit data to the agencies that provide funds as part of their grant requirements. In Colorado, the Department of Public Safety, Department of Human Services Domestic Violence Program, and Department of Public Health and Environment's Sexual Assault Prevention Program collect data. The Department of Human Services collects aggregate data from the 45 service providers it funds, covering roughly 70% of the local agencies providing domestic violence services. These data are published in an annual report and shared with the Colorado Coalition Against Domestic Violence and the public upon request.

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Connecticut

Domestic Violence Legislation:Yes (815a, 46b-38a)
NIBRS Status:Certified
Additional IBR Elements:Yes
Law Enforcement DV System:Incident-Based
Service Provider DV System:Summary
Service Provider SA System:Incident-Based

The state does have domestic violence legislation that includes same-sex relationships. Incident-based data are collected by the Connecticut Department of Public Safety's Division of State Police from 75 of the 102 law enforcement agencies in the state and include 2 additional data elements: yes/no indicators for gang- and domestic-related incidents. Agencies also submit Family Violence Reports for every incident that results in arrest. State summary and incident-based data are available online.

The Connecticut Coalition Against Domestic Violence collects quarterly progress reports from its eighteen member programs that receive Violence Against Women and VOCA grants, as well as state funds for direct service to victims of domestic violence. The Connecticut Sexual Assault Crisis Services collects information from it's nine member centers. The Coalition also evaluates the member centers by surveying clients and staff. No reports are available but aggregate data are available upon request. The Connecticut Office of Policy and Management collects summary statistics from agencies receiving grants.

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Delaware

Domestic Violence Legislation:Yes (Title 10:9:III, §1041)
NIBRS Status:Certified
Additional Data ElementsYes
Law Enforcement DV System:Incident-based
Service Provider DV System:Summary
Service Provider SA System:Summary


State Summary

In 2007, the state's definition of domestic violence was expanded to include dating and same sex couples. In 2008, the state passed legislation enhancing the harassment and stalking statutes. A fee was also added for certified copies of marriage license certificates to be used to make grants to programs providing direct services to victims of domestic violence. In 2009, additional legislation was passed that redefines the witnessing of domestic violence by children to include by sound as well as sight and a Teen Dating Violence Task Force was established to evaluate and make recommendations on policy.

The state is NIBRS-certified and in addition to the required NIBRS elements collects name and date of birth information. Law enforcement agencies submit NIBRS data to the Delaware State Police State Bureau of Identification Uniform Crime Reporting Section. The data are also shared with the Delaware Criminal Justice Information System (DELJIS), which networks the criminal justice system data in the state, including protection orders.

The Delaware Coalition Against Domestic Violence and CONTACT Delaware, which houses the Sexual Assault Network of Delaware, do not collect data from local service providers. The Coalition Against Domestic Violence does not offer services, only provides resources and referrals to local providers. CONTACT Delaware maintains the Rape Crisis Center and does collect information on clients seen at its facility. The Criminal Justice Council collects aggregate totals from local service providers that receive federal family violence or victims of crime grants. The information is compiled into an annual report to fulfill the Council's grant requirements. A yearly public report is also available upon request.

The Domestic Violence Coordinating Council does not directly collect data, but does receive data from the State Bureau of Identification, Family Court, and from service providers that are used in an annual report. The Delaware Attorney General's Office collects statistics for Violence Against Women Act prosecutors in Kent and Sussex Counties. Although no reports are produced, the information is available upon request.

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District of Columbia

Domestic Violence Legislation:Yes (16-1051)
NIBRS Status:Developing
Additional IBR Elements:Yes
Law Enforcement DV System:Incident-based
Service Provider DV System:Incident-based
Service Provider SA System:Incident-based

The District of Columbia has legislation in place that defines domestic violence, including same-sex romantic relationships. The DC Metropolitan Police Department (MPD) collects incident-based data but does not report NIBRS data to the FBI. The DC Metro Transit Police Department (MTPD), on the other hand, is NIBRS certified and provides incident-level information. The MTPD does collect data elements in addition to what is required by NIBRS.

The MPD reports incidents that have been identified as domestic violence cases. When an incident is flagged as domestic, a supplemental report is completed, which includes various information about the offense, victim, and suspect. Only sexual assault and stalking arrests are tracked in the arrests database, however. A specialized unit of MPD, the Domestic Violence Unit, summarizes the number of domestic violence cases and provides the information in an annual fact sheet. Similarly, the Sexual Assault Unit compiles forcible rape statistics using the Automated Standard Application for Payments (ASAP) system. This unit also submits a daily morning report on sexual assault incidents to each district and an annual report to the Mayor.

The Domestic Violence Unit of the District of Columbia Superior Court manages all domestic violence cases that come through the criminal justice system. The unit submits monthly and annual reports to the Executive Office, which publishes the information in its annual report. The Office of the Deputy Mayor for Public Safety and Justice's Office of Victim Services administers state funds to crime victim service providers. In return, those agencies provide OVS with counts of the number of clients seen on a monthly basis. These data are not currently provided to the public.

The DC Coalition Against Domestic Violence collects incident-based data that are reported to the Office of Victim's Services. The DC Rape Crisis Center also collects incident-level data on hotline calls and shelter visits. Currently, this information is only for internal use.

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Florida

Domestic Violence Legislation:Yes (741-28)
NIBRS Status:No plans
Law Enforcement DV System:Summary
Service Provider DV System:Summary
Service Provider SA System:Incident-based

The state does have domestic violence legislation that includes same-sex relationships if partners are residing in the same household. The definition of domestic violence only includes persons who are currently living together or who lived together in the past unless they share a child. Florida has no plans to switch to an incident-based reporting system; law enforcement agencies currently submit summary data to the Florida Department of Law Enforcement. No specialized system exists for reporting domestic or sexual violence incidents outside of the summary system. Crime counts are published in an annual report.

The Florida Coalition Against Domestic Violence collects summary statistics from all 41 certified domestic violence centers, which enter the information directly into a standardized local database. The Coalition does not publish the information. The Florida Council Against Sexual Violence does not collect any information from service providers. The Florida Department of Health's Sexual Violence Prevention Program collects data through the confidential, internet-based Sexual Violence Data Registry. Rape crisis centers, domestic violence centers, and other entities voluntarily enter information on victims and sexual violence services provided to victims, regardless of whether the incident was reported to law enforcement. The data are not available to the public, but are used to make programmatic decisions and produce reports.

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Georgia

Domestic Violence Legislation:Yes (§19-13-1)
NIBRS Status:No Formal Plans
Law Enforcement DV System:Incident-based
Service Provider DV System:Summary
Service Provider SA System:Summary

The state's domestic violence legislation does include same-sex relationships. Although the state is not NIBRS-certified, Norcross PD has been issued certification and submits its incident-based information directly to the FBI. The other 600-plus agencies submit incident-based family violence data to the Georgia Bureau of Investigation (GBI) monthly using a standardized report form. The GBI also maintains the state's protection order database.

The Georgia Coalition Against Domestic Violence does not collect data from local programs but rather uses newspapers to gather information on domestic violence-related deaths. Information collected includes county, victim age, offender prior criminal history, means and specifics of death, and location. Information is not shared with the public but is sent to Coalition members.

The Georgia Network to End Sexual Assault collects information from the local rape crisis centers. Currently the information is collected yearly; however, the Network plans to collect the information on a monthly basis. The data that are collected are not published or released to the public but are provided to legislators.

Georgia's Department of Human Resources collects information from 45 domestic violence shelters and 23 rape crisis centers across the state through two separate online databases. All of the collected information is available upon request but is not published.

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Hawaii

Domestic Violence Legislation:Yes (§586-1)
NIBRS Status:Developing
Additional Data ElementsNo
Law Enforcement DV System:Summary
Service Provider DV System:Summary
Service Provider SA System:

The state's domestic violence legislation does include same-sex relationships. The state is developing an incident-based reporting system for the state; currently, however, development has been put on hold. Although each of Hawaii's four main police departments has a different crime data collection system, all report summary crime data to the Department of the Attorney General's Crime Prevention and Justice Assistance Division. The Division conducted an annual statewide crime victimization survey between 1994 and 1998; a new victimization survey is being implemented in 2006. The Division also collects semiannual reports on the number of sexual assault victims receiving services at the Sex Abuse Treatment Center in Honolulu and on the neighboring islands. All of the data are published in annual reports.

The Hawaii State Coalition Against Domestic Violence provides support to the local service providers, but is working to develop a data collection program as part of the statewide strategic plan. The Hawaii State Department of Health conducts the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey, including the domestic and sexual violence modules. The Department also conducts the national Youth Risk Behavior Survey in middle and high schools in Hawaii, which includes questions on sexual and intimate partner violence.

The Hawaii State Judiciary Family Court tracks cases involving domestic abuse protective orders and domestic abuse charges. The Judiciary publishes court statistical reports for the State Legislature and the public, which are available online.

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Idaho

Domestic Violence Legislation:Yes (39-6303)
NIBRS Status:Certified
Additional IBR Elements:No
Law Enforcement DV System:Incident-based
Service Provider DV System:Summary
Service Provider SA System:Summary

Idaho's domestic violence legislation does include same-sex romantic relationships. The state is NIBRS certified and reporting is mandated by the state with the result that approximately 99% of the law enforcement agencies are reporting incident-based data to the State Police UCR Program. Agencies can submit information directly using the Idaho Law Enforcement Telecommunications System (ILETS) or by sending extracts from agency records management systems. No extra data elements have been added to what is required by the FBI. The Idaho State Police's Statistical Analysis Center analyzes the law enforcement data and has published several reports focusing on domestic violence. The SAC is also responsible for conducting a victimization survey every three years, including questions on domestic violence and stalking. The 2008 survey was recently completed and the annual report will be available in December. The State Police also maintains the state database of protection orders, accessible to all law enforcement agencies.

The Idaho Coalition Against Sexual and Domestic Violence does not collect data from local agencies; this instead falls to the Idaho Council on Domestic Violence and Victim Assistance. The Council collects summary data from the 47 agencies receiving state funds, which covers the majority of programs in the state. All information is entered directly into databases maintained by the Council.

The Idaho Industrial Commission's Crime Victims Compensation Program collects information on victims applying for compensation. The information includes victim and offense information, as well as the relationship of the offender to the victim.

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Illinois

Domestic Violence Legislation:Yes (See Sec. 112A-3)
NIBRS Status:Developing
Additional Data ElementsNo
Law Enforcement DV System:Specialized Incident-Based
Service Provider DV System:Incident-Based
Service Provider SA System:Incident-Based

Illinois has domestic violence legislation that includes same-sex relationships. The Illinois State Police collects summary index crime statistics from law enforcement, including sexual assault, and incident-based domestic violence data. The domestic violence data are collected on supplemental forms submitted monthly. Although the law enforcement data are summary in nature, the state does not implement the hierarchy rule, so all index offenses occurring in an incident are reported to the state. The state previously collected NIBRS data and are now developing an updated collection system. No additional data elements are included.

All orders of protection issued in Illinois are entered into the Law Enforcement Agencies Data System (LEADS), maintained by the State Police. All law enforcement agencies have access to LEADS. The Illinois Criminal Justice Information Authority (ICJA), Illinois Coalition Against Domestic Violence, and Illinois Coalition Against Sexual Assault maintain pdf document InfoNet, a statewide service provider system. Local service providers enter client-level information directly into the InfoNet system. Agencies can then use the system to access their agency data and generate reports. Currently, 81 domestic violence centers, 57 sexual assault centers, and 10 child advocacy centers submit data to InfoNet.

Kankakee, McLean, Peoria, and St. Clair counties have established Multi-Disciplinary Response Teams to address domestic violence concerns. In addition to InfoNet, these counties have implemented the Domestic Abuse Information Network (DAIN).

Illinois does not conduct regular victimization surveys; however, the ICJA did conduct a statewide survey in 2002.

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Indiana

Domestic Violence Legislation:Yes (IC 31-9-2-44.5)
NIBRS Status:Testing
Law Enforcement DV System:None
Service Provider DV System:Summary
Service Provider SA System:Summary

Indiana's domestic violence legislation does include same-sex relationships. The state does not have a crime reporting program, so no agency collects law enforcement statistics at the state level. Instead, the Indiana State Police and 30% of the individual local agencies report statistcis directly to the FBI. As a result, there is no statewide law enforcement domestic violence data collection in place. The State Police are currently testing an incident-based system.

The Indiana Criminal Justice Institute administers VOCA funds and collects progress reports from approximately 160 agencies in the state. These reports consist of summary counts of the number of clients served and basic demographics. The information is not included in any reports. The Institute is also developing a protection order database for the state.

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Iowa

Domestic Violence Legislation:Yes (Chapter 236.2)
NIBRS Status:Certified
Additional IBR Elements:Yes
Law Enforcement DV System:Incident-based
Service Provider DV System:Summary
Service Provider SA System:Summary

Iowa's domestic violence legislation includes same-sex romantic relationships. The state is NIBRS certified, covering 94% of the state population with all but 14 law enforcement agencies reporting incident-based data to the Iowa Department of Public Safety Uniform Crime Reporting Program, covering approximately 93% of the state population. These data are published in annual reports. Additional data elements have been added to the state system, and a check box to indicate domestic violence incidents has been added to the incident report form. Other new elements include:

  • type of referral (legal, medical, counseling, shelter, financial, other);
  • children (present - not harmed, present - abused, none present);
  • report received from (victim, other);
  • name and address of victim; and
  • name and address of offender.

The Department of Public Safety also maintains the Sex Offender Registry, which is available to the public. The Iowa Division of Criminal and Juvenile Justice Planning maintains the Justice Data Warehouse, which includes data from the Iowa Court Information System and the Iowa Corrections Offender Network. The Warehouse is available online and is accessible to the public. The most recent statewide victimization survey was conducted in 1997.

The Iowa Coalition Against Domestic Violence does not collect data from local service providers but is a member of the Domestic Violence Death Review Team. The team, whose members include representatives from state agencies, reviews intimate partner deaths. Using data from the Attorney General's Office and the Office of the Medical Examiner, as well reports from the media and victim's family, the team attempts to identify gaps in services. A report of findings was published by the Department of Public Health. The Iowa Coalition Against Sexual Assault collects summary information on victims who receive services from local providers that receive Coalition funding. Currently, 20 agencies report information, with another 27 member agencies expected to start submitting information once the Coalition's system is enhanced. The information is used to respond to public requests and will be used in reports once the system upgrade is complete.

The Rape Victim Advocacy Program collects information on the services it provides in four counties (Johnson, Iowa, Washington, Cedar) and the number of hotline callers. This information is entered into a database and shared with the Coalition Against Sexual Assault. The Iowa Attorney General's Crime Victim Assistance Division collects information from victims applying for compensation either through the Crime Victim Compensation Program or the Sexual Abuse Examination Program. The Division also collects summary information from all local domestic and sexual violence service providers in the state. These agencies can enter the information directly into the appropriate Program's database or can send a hardcopy form. The information is included in an annual report and is available upon request.

The Iowa General Assembly created the Sex Offender Research Council within the Division of Criminal and Juvenile Justice Planning. Since 2006, the Council has released annual reports on a variety of topics, including electronic monitoring, updating addresses in the sex offender registry, risk assessments, treatment, and the impact of the special sentence (a new 10-year or life-time supervision).

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Kansas

Domestic Violence Legislation:Yes (21-3412a)
NIBRS Status:Certified
Additional IBR Elements:Yes
Law Enforcement DV System:Incident-Based
Service Provider DV System:Summary
Service Provider SA System:Summary

Kansas has domestic violence legislation that includes same-sex romantic relationships if individuals currently or have previously resided together. The state is NIBRS certified, and data are collected by the Kansas Bureau of Investigation (KBI). In addition to the NIBRS data elements, approximately 160 additional elements are being collected. Currently 423 of the 435 agencies in the state report incident-based data to the KBI. The 12 agencies that do not submit incident-based reports are asked to complete information packets for domestic violence and rape incidents, including all of the NIBRS data elements except victim and offender characteristics. This information is not reported at the incident level but instead is reported as counts. Agencies that report incident-based data use standard incident reports that include a check box for domestic violence incidents. Data are available upon request from the KBI.

The Kansas Coalition Against Sexual and Domestic Violence uses the Alice software program, which allows member agencies to create their own client intake forms and enter the information into a localized database. This information is then shared with the Coalition. Since each agency can customize the system for its own use, the Coalition is in the process of creating a standardized intake form and instruction manual. Aggregate data are available upon request.

The Kansas Sentencing Commission keeps statistics on all felony court cases, including rape. The information is available in its Annual Report or by request. The Kansas Judicial Branch maintains a statewide database on protection orders, with updates received weekly from local courts. Yearly totals are published in an annual report.

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Kentucky

Domestic Violence Legislation:pdf documentYes (Chapter 403, Sections .715 - .785)
NIBRS Status:Testing
Additional Data Elements:No
Law Enforcement DV System:Incident-based
Service Provider DV System:Summary
Service Provider SA System:Summary


The state definition of domestic violence only includes persons who are currently living together or who lived together in the past unless they share a common child, regardless of sex. Although the state is not NIBRS certified, some agencies in the state are certified to collect and report incident-based data, and law enforcement agencies submit data electronically to the Kentucky State Police. Currently 10 of the law enforcement agencies in the state are submitting incident-based data; the agencies submitting summary data are not required to submit any additional information on domestic or sexual violence incidents. No data elements are collected other than what are required by NIBRS, although the State Police are considering adding elements. The incident-based data are included in the Law Information Network of Kentucky (LINK) system, along with domestic violence protection orders. Data are published in an annual crime report and are available upon request.

The Kentucky Domestic Violence Association collects data from domestic violence programs monthly. Aggregate data are available from the Web site and upon request. The Kentucky Association of Sexual Assault Programs collects service data from rape crisis centers quarterly. Data are available upon request.

All law enforcement agencies are required to submit domestic violence incident information to the Families and Children Cabinet of the Department of Community-based Services, Division of Protection and Permanency. This information is included in the State Police annual crime report.


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Louisiana

Domestic Violence Legislation:Yes (RS14:35.3)
NIBRS Status:Certified
Additional Data Elements:No
Law Enforcement DV System:Incident-Based

Louisiana's domestic abuse battery law includes only opposite-sex partners who are currently living, or have previously lived, in the same residence. The state is NIBRS-certified and currently 23 law enforcement agencies submit incident-based data to the Louisiana Commission on Law Enforcement and approximately 10 agencies are testing incident-based reporting systems. Agencies not submitting incident-based data do not provide any information on domestic or sexual assault incidents. The Commission provides data upon request.

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Maine

Domestic Violence Legislation:Yes (19-A:§4002)
NIBRS Status:Certified
Additional Elements:Yes
Law Enforcement DV System:Mixed Incident-Based/Summary
Service Provider DV System:Summary
Service Provider SA System:Summary

Maine does have legislation defining domestic violence that only includes partners who have lived together or are or were sexual partners. No specification is made on gender of the partners. The state is NIBRS certified with 16 of the 133 law enforcement agencies are currently submitting incident-based data to the Maine State Police. Sixteen data elements in addition to what is required are collected, including several pertaining particularly to incidents involving law enforcement officers killed or assaulted (LEOKA). Additional data elements are outlined in the pdf document NIBRS Reporting Manual and include:
  • geocode
  • local geocode
  • Maine statute
  • modus operandi
  • entry method
  • entry direction
  • entry point
  • suspect vehicle body style
  • suspect vehicle style
  • tools used
  • security
  • LEOKA incident type
  • LEOKA assignment type
  • LEOKA activity type
  • offender descriptor
  • arrestee descriptor
Law enforcement agencies that do not submit NIBRS data are required to provide quarterly reports to the state police. These reports include a supplemental domestic assault section, which include summary counts of different domestic situations by weapon type. Data are published in annual reports and are available upon request. The Criminal Justice Statistical Analysis Center, part of the University of Southern Maine's Muskie School of Public Service, works extensively with domestic and sexual violence data in the state and is conducting a statewide victimization survey. The results of the survey will be published in a report.

The Maine Coalition to End Domestic Violence collects summary counts of services and clients from its pdf document nine member programs on a monthly basis using standardized forms that vary based on the service provided by the agency. The Maine Coalition Against Sexual Assault collects summary hotline and client activity data from ten sexual assault centers in the state using a standard form. The Coalition is in the process of implementing software to house the database. Both the Coalition to End Domestic Violence and the Coalition Against Sexual Assault share their data with the Maine Department of Health and Human Services.

The Sexual Assault Response Services of Southern Maine also collects data from hotline calls and sexual assault centers in York and Cumberland counties. The agency uses standard forms to collect information from law enforcement, medical examiners, legal service providers, and sexual assault response teams. All of the data are compiled into an annual report and are available upon request. The Maine Center for Disease Control and Prevention, formerly the Bureau of Health, maintains the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System for the state. The survey, conducted every four years, has included the sexual violence module since 2002.

The Office of the Maine Attorney General prosecutes all homicides in the state, over half of which result from domestic violence. As a result, the Office has formed two groups to examine the issue: The Maine Commission on Domestic and Sexual Abuse and the Domestic Abuse Homicide Review Panel. The Commission makes recommendations on legislative and policy actions, while the Panel reviews domestic homicide cases and recommends methods of improving systems for protecting victims from domestic and sexual abuse.

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Maryland

Domestic Violence Legislation:Yes (§4-513)
NIBRS Status:No planned involvement
Law Enforcement DV System:Incident-Based
Service Provider DV System:Summary
Service Provider SA System:Summary

Maryland does have legislation defining domestic violence that includes same-sex romantic relationships. Although the state does not collect incident-based crime data in general, the Maryland State Police does collect incident-based information on domestic violence incidents on a monthly basis from law enforcement agencies. This information is published in a Domestic Violence section in the State Police's annual Crime in Maryland, which is available by request. This report also includes information on sexual assault incidents.

The domestic violence service providers in the state each use their own data collection systems, usually based on funding requirements. The Maryland Network Against Domestic Violence does not collect service statistics, but does compile a list of homicide statistics based on information gathered from local newspapers, the Internet and the State Policegets. The Network also gets data from the Department of Human Resources' Office of Victim Services. The Office collects information from service providers who receive funding from the Department. Every grantee submits monthly and quarterly reports. The information is provided in the Office of Victim Services' annual report, which is available online (see below). The Governor's Office of Crime Control and Prevention also collects statistics from grantees.

The Maryland Coalition Against Sexual Assault, on the other hand, does collect summary information using a standard survey form. Only service providers receiving funding from the Coalition submit data, however. This information is collected annually. Both agencies will provide information upon request.

The Center for Preventative Health Services's Department of Health and Mental Hygiene participates in the Center for Disease Control and Prevention's National Violent Data Reporting System, gathering data from death certificates, medical examiner and police reports. Some intimate partner information is collected. Data are available on request.

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Massachusetts

Domestic Violence Legislation:Yes (209A,1)
NIBRS Status:Certified
Additional Elements:Yes
Law Enforcement DV System:Incident-based
Service Provider DV System:Summary
Service Provider SA System:Summary

The Commonwealth does have domestic violence legislation that includes same-sex relationships. Even though no separate statewide domestic violence or sexual assault law enforcement data collection system exists, 260 agencies currently report NIBRS data to the Crime Reporting Unit of the Massachusetts State Police. The State Police has added additional fields to what is required by NIBRS, including: offender tracking number, adding law enforcement officer as a victim and additional details, latitude and longitude of the incident location, address, city, and an additional location field that specifies additional offense characteristics. All of these additions are outlined in the pdf document state manual. Law enforcement agencies that are not submitting incident-based data do not provide additional domestic violence or sexual assault characteristics.

Jane Doe, which functions as the Massachusetts Coalition Against Sexual Assault and Domestic Violence, collects summary data from domestic violence and sexual assault service providers. The organization surveyed all of its member organizations in 2001; the information collected resulted in a report outlining the delivery of services. All of the information is provided on the Jane Doe Web site. Jane Doe staff also chair the Governor's Commission on Sexual and Domestic Violence Data Analysis Committee, which conducts research on domestic violence, sexual assault, and child abuse data collection systems in the state. In addition, the agency's Intimate Partner Homicide Program tracks deaths resulting from domestic violence as researched through the media and Internet. Information is entered into a database and profiles are presented on its Web site.

The Massachusetts Executive Office of Public Safety collects sexual assault data from medical facilities and Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners (SANEs). The Provider Sexual Crime Report (PSCR) is a data collection instrument that was created to help explain the volume and characteristics of rape and sexual assault in the state. Medical providers are required by law to fill out a PSCR for every sexual assault and rape in which the victim sought medical treatment. The PSCR provides detailed data on sexual crimes that commonly go unreported to police and as a result are not recorded or tracked in official statistics. The Office has also created the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) Advisory Committee, composed of a multidisciplinary group of professionals from prosecution, law enforcement, public health, sexual assault and domestic violence communities, and judiciary and social service agencies. The Committee is charged with providing the Executive Office of Public Safety with expertise, guidance, and recommendations in the development of a statewide implementation plan and in the identification of need in the areas of domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking.

The Massachusetts Department of Public Health has a number of programs involved in domestic and sexual violence. The Bureau of Family and Community Health's Violence Prevention and Intervention Services collects summary information from agencies that receive funding. Agencies submit different information depending on the services they provide. The programs offered by the unit include:

  • Batterer Intervention Program Services, which certifies agencies to provide services. Data are collected from the 22 certified programs in the state;


  • Collaborative Abuse Prevention in Racial and Ethnic Minority (CARE) Communities, which creates networks of service agencies to provide sexual assault and domestic violence intervention, outreach, and community education within particular racial and ethnic communities;


  • Gay Men's Domestic Violence Prevention, which funds outreach to gay, bisexual, and transgender male victims of domestic violence;


  • Massachusetts Rural Domestic Violence and Child Victimization Project, which funds three battered women's programs in rural areas of Western Massachusetts and strives to educate the public and professionals in that area about domestic violence;


  • Refugee and Immigrant Safety and Empowerment (RISE) Program, which funds 16 community-based programs across the state to provide particular ethnic communities with education and outreach services related to violence against women;


  • Research and Evaluation, which tracks the incidence and prevalence of domestic violence and sexual assault in the Commonwealth;


  • Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner (SANE) Program, which trains, certifies, and supports specially trained registered nurses and physicians to provide care and forensic evidence collection to sexual assault victims entering designated emergency departments. Nurse examiners complete incident-based forms on each client seen;


  • Sexual Assault Prevention and Survivor Services (SAPSS), which supports statewide and regional training, educational materials, data reports, and collaborations to reduce sexual assaults and support survivors. Rape Crisis Centers funded through this program provide community and professional education on sexual assault prevention and intervention, as well as free direct services to survivors, their families, and friends. This program collects summary data from the centers and the Spanish hotline, LLamanos. These data are used for program evaluation and reports.


The Center for Health Information, Statistics, Research and Evaluation, also in the Department of Public Health, maintains three data collection systems in the state:
  • Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, which randomly surveys adults on a variety of health and risk factors, including sexual and domestic violence;


  • Injury Surveillance System, which monitors various data sources in the state to analyze incidence, trends, risk factors and circumstances of injuries and disseminates this information to injury prevention advocates. Although sexual abuse information is collected, no information on the offender is collected and so domestic abuse cannot be identified. The data sources include:
    • Vital Records Database
    • Hospital Discharge Database
    • Outpatient Observation Database
    • Emergency Department Injury Surveillance System
    • Weapon-Related Injury Surveillance System
    • Medical Examiner Database
    • Supplemental Homicide Reports
    • Youth Risk Behavior Survey
    • Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System
    • Fatality Analysis Reporting System
    • Emergency Department Database
  • Weapon-Related Injury Surveillance System, a component of the Injury Surveillance System, which monitors gunshot and stabbing injuries from hospital and health care center annual reports.


The Massachusetts Office for Victim Assistance collects domestic violence data through two programs:

  • Family Violence Homicide Record gathers domestic violence homicide information from various media sources. Staff peruse newspaper articles and conduct Internet searches and create narrative accounts of incidents. The information will eventually be included in a domestic violence database.


  • Safety Assistance for Every Person Leaving Abuse Now (SAFEPLAN) is a court-based advocacy program that awards federal and state money to programs providing court-based advocacy. SAFEPLAN programs exist in 41 courts in 9 counties across the state. Court staff complete client intake forms, which are entered into the Office for Victims Assistance database.
The Office includes all statistics in its annual report and for internal analysis. Individual court statistics are published in the Program Funding Directory.

The Massachusetts Department of Social Services is in the process of developing a new data collection system for basic information regarding the utilization of shelter and community-based services. Monthly reports of client demographics will be collected from service providers beginning in 2007. With funding from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Massachusetts Department of Education's Youth Risk Behavior Survey includes questions on dating violence. Conducted every other year, results are published and available on the Department of Education's Web site.

The Massachusetts Probate and Family Court Department collects information on emergency domestic violence restraining orders issued after court hours through the Judicial Response System. Each participating judge submits a log to the Administrative Office of the court that includes information on each case. These logs are entered into a case management system, which is used to tract domestic abuse complaints. The information is published in annual and quarterly reports. The District Court Department also tracks the number of abuse protection orders filed in every district. Currently, 62 courts submit monthly reports of summary counts of the cases filed and disposed for every case type. An automated system is being developed and will be implemented in 2007. This system will link restraining order registration with the case file.

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Michigan

Domestic Violence Legislation:Yes (400 Act 389)
NIBRS Status:Certified
Additional IBR Elements:Yes
Law Enforcement DV System:No
Service Provider DV System:Incident-Based
Service Provider SA System:Incident-Based

The State of Michigan does have legislation in place defining domestic violence in the state, including same-sex romantic relationships. The Michigan State Police (MSP) collect incident-based crime data from roughly 95% of law enforcement agencies in the state. The Michigan Incident Crime Reporting (MICR) system includes all of the NIBRS elements plus some additional data values. While the only additional data elements are city and county codes, the MICR system includes additional victim types, ethnicity, residence, circumstance, injury and relationship codes. A full list of MICR codes is available. Agencies that are not reporting MICR data are not reporting domestic or sexual violence data other than crime counts as required by the FBI.

To assist agencies in prosecuting domestic violence incidents, the MSP developed a Standard Domestic Relationship Incident Report to act as a guideline. This form must be completed for every domestic incident and provided to the local prosecutor's office. The MSP also manages the Law Enforcement Information (LEIN) System, which includes a statewide database of protection orders accessible to law enforcement agencies.

The Michigan Department of Community Health funds the Sexual Assault Surveillance System (SASS) Project as part of the Violence and Intentional Injury Prevention Program. Located at the Michigan State University's Institute for Children, Youth and Families in the College of Human Ecology, the SASS staff collects, analyzes, and disseminates data sets from state agencies. Currently, SASS includes law enforcement information from the Michigan State Police; community information from the Centers for Disease Control's Youth Risk Behavior Survey and the Center for Demography and Ecology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison's National Survey of Families and Households; and corrections information from the Michigan Department of Corrections. SASS staff are also in the process of analyzing MSP's Sexually Motivated Crime information. The information collected as part of SASS is available from its Web site.

The Department of Community Health also collects intimate partner and sexual violence and homicide data through two surveillance systems. The Michigan Intimate Partner Violence Surveillance System (MIPVSS) collects data on non-fatal cases of intimate partner violence from 21 hospital emergency departments and 15 county prosecuting attorney offices. All cases determined to be intimate are sent to the Michigan Public Health Institute. The Institute reviews and corrects the information, which is then sent to the Department of Community Health's Injury Prevention Section for analysis.

The second system, the Michigan Intimate Partner Homicide Surveillance System (MIPHSS), tracks intimate partner deaths from various sources, including prosecuting attorneys, the Michigan State Police, medical examiners, death certificates, and newspapers. Currently 78 of the 83 county prosecuting attorneys submit information through the Adult Tracking System, operated by the Prosecuting Attorney's Association of Michigan. Medical examiner data are obtained through the Michigan Medical Examiner Database, a voluntary case-management system managed by the Michigan Public Health Institute's Center for Collaborative Research in Health Outcomes and Policy. Death certificates are maintained by the Department of Community Health in the Vital Records and Health Data Development Section. The Department of Community Health will share data upon request.

The Michigan State Court Administrative Office collects monthly reports of personal protection orders filed in all of the state courts. Information collected includes whether the order was domestic and whether the abuser is a juvenile or adult. Stalking protection orders are also collected but are not considered to be domestic. Information is published annually.

The Michigan Domestic Violence Prevention and Treatment Board collects information from pdf document 45 service providers in the state. Each service provider submits a Client Information Report quarterly to the Board, along with Activity and Narrative Reports. The Board shares information upon request but no published reports are currently available. The Michigan Coalition Against Domestic and Sexual Violence does not collect information from state shelters and service providers, but rather provides newsletters and fact sheets to support these agencies.

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Minnesota

Domestic Violence Legislation:Yes (518B.01)
NIBRS Status:Developing
Law Enforcement DV System:No
Service Provider DV System:Summary
Service Provider SA System:Summary

Minnesota does have legislation defining domestic violence that does include same-sex romantic relationships. The Minnesota Department of Public Safety's Bureau of Criminal Apprehension does not collect incident-based law enforcement data and does not have a separate data collection program for domestic violence or sexual assault incidents.

The Minnesota Office of Justice Programs' Crime Victim Services unit collects domestic violence and sexual assault information from pdf document 150 service providers receiving grants from the Office. The Office funds six domestic or sexual violence program areas, each with its own reporting form: Domestic Violence Community Advocacy, Domestic Violence Criminal Justice Intervention, Domestic Violence Shelter, Domestic Violence Hotel/Motel & Safe Home Program, General Crime Victim Advocacy, and Sexual Assault Programs. Information is collected on the number of people receiving services and the demographics of victims seen by each program. The General Crime Victim Advocacy and Sexual Assault Program forms also include questions on stalking. The Minnesota Office of Justice Programs' Statistical Analysis Center uses the information in various reports and fact sheets.

The Minnesota Department of Health's Injury and Violence Prevention unit collects domestic and sexual violence data from hospitals via the Minnesota Injury Data Access System (MIDAS). Roughly 90% of all hospitals in the state participate in the program and the information can be queried online. Once the IVP selects domestic and sexual violence incidents from MIDAS, staff complete Report of Injury Forms and Intimate Partner Violence Injury and Sexual Violence Data Collection Forms and confirm the information from medical records. These data are then used to prepare data briefs.

The Minnesota Program Development's Domestic Abuse Intervention Project in Duluth compiles information from law enforcement and court case files into the Domestic Abuse Information Network (DAIN). Several criminal justice agencies can access DAIN, including South St. Louis County law enforcement officers and the Safe Haven shelter. Minnesota Program Development is also a member of the Battered Women's Justice Project (BWJP). Along with the Pennsylvania Coalition Against Domestic Violence and the National Clearinghouse for the Defense of Battered Women, the BWJP maintains libraries of recouses and provides training and technical assistance across the country. The Minnesota Program Development also maintains a Visitation Center Database, which tracks families that utilize the Visitation Center's services. The database collects information on individuals, referrals, the type of victimization, and court information. Information is not available to the public but will be shared with researchers upon request.

The Minnesota State Court Administration Office maintains a separate database for orders of protection. Access to the database without a court order is limited to law enforcement agencies, some court personnel, and some government agencies. Summary statistics on orders for protection as well as on assault court cases can be obtained from the Office.

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Mississippi

Domestic Violence Legislation: Yes (§97-3-7)
NIBRS Status:Testing
Law Enforcement DV System:No
Service Provider DV System:Summary
Service Provider SA System:Summary

Mississippi has statewide legislation defining domestic violence and it does include same-sex romantic relationships. Since the state does not have a statewide Uniform Crime Reporting Unit, no law enforcement data are collected at the state level. The Mississippi Department of Health collects information from 14 domestic violence shelters and 8 rape crisis centers in the state using standardized forms. These data are in turn shared with the Department of Public Safety, the Mississippi Coalition Against Sexual Assault, and the Mississippi State Coalition Against Domestic Violence. The Department of Health publishes statistics related to domestic violence and sexual assault in its Annual Report. The Mississippi Attorney General's Office Crime Prevention and Victim Services Division collects information on referrals from law enforcement agencies and service providers and publishes monthly statistical reports.

The Department of Health and Attorney General's Office will share data upon request.

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Missouri

Domestic Violence Legislation: Yes (455.010)
NIBRS Status:Certified
Additional IBR Elements:Yes
Law Enforcement DV System:Voluntary Incident-Based
Service Provider DV System:Incident-Based
Service Provider SA System:Summary

The state of Missouri has legislation defining domestic violence that does include same-sex relationships. The state is certified to collect NIBRS data and fifteen law enforcement agencies in the state are reporting. The Missouri State Highway Patrol has added over 100 additional data elements to its incident-based system, including:

  • separate domestic violence indicator
  • separate domestic violence relationship
  • prior domestic violence incident against victim
  • prior domestic violence incident against offender
  • court order of protection in place
  • offender is a registered sex offender
The Missouri system also includes a Person segment, which includes identifying information such as address, date of birth, and employer for arrestees, offenders, victims, and witnesses. The full reporting specifications are available online.

Currently law enforcement agency incident reports have a check box to indicate when an incident is domestic in nature. On a voluntary basis, agencies also submit a supplemental report monthly, which includes summaries of the number of domestic violence incidents by relationship of victim and offender, as well as all forcible rape incidents. The Highway Patrol provides domestic violence statistics on the Statistical Analysis Center Web site. The Center also provides data upon request.

The Missouri Office for Victims of Crime also collects counts of crimes, including domestic violence and rape, from the State Highway Patrol. These counts are included in an annual report, which will eventually be available from its Web site.

The Missouri Coalition Against Domestic and Sexual Violence (formerly the Missouri Coalition Against Domestic Violence) collects data monthly from its 107 member programs, including victim demographics and data on the services provided. The Coalition uses this information in conjunction with the data reported to the Highway Patrol to produce monthly and annual reports. The Missouri Coalition Against Sexual Assault collects only summary statistics on the number of clients served by each agency.

The Department of Health and Senior Services' (DHSS) Office of Surveillance collects information on patient injuries from every state hospital using the Missouri Information Community Assessment (MICA). MICA collects pdf document 40 incident-based data elements. The data are available online from the MICA Web site; however, the information is combined into one category (Abuse/Neglect/Rape). A report is published each year that includes spouse/partner assaults, sexual assault and rape by age, and race of victim by state and by county. The DHSS is also collecting domestic violence and sexual assault information through the state Behavioral Risk Factor System. These data should be available on the Web soon.

Collection of Victim Evidence Regarding Sexual Assault (COVERSA) is an independent Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner (SANE) program in the Kansas City area. Victims who give consent for a forensic exam are included in an internal database; select information is shared with law enforcement when the victim chooses to file an incident report. The local crime lab, police department, prosecutor's office, and victim advocate's office all have limited access to some of the information in the database.

Safe Connections (formerly Women's Support and Community Services) tracks the number of calls received by its 24-hour hotline in the St. Louis City and County area. The number of calls relating to rape, incest, child abuse, and sexual assault, along with caller demographics, are included in an annual report. Data are available in aggregate form upon request.

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Montana

Domestic Violence Legislation: Yes (45-5-206)
NIBRS Status:Certified
Additional IBR Elements:Yes
Law Enforcement DV System:Incident-Based
Service Provider DV System:Incident-Based
Service Provider SA System:Incident-Based
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The state of Montana has statewide legislation defining domestic violence, but it does not include same-sex romantic relationships. One hundred eleven of 118 law enforcement agencies are currently reporting incident-based data directly to the Montana Board of Crime Control (MBCC); agencies using summary-based systems have a separate check box on their incident reports to indicate aggravated or simple domestic violence incidents. The state IBR system does include one additional IBR data element in the form of a flag for domestic abuse incidents. The Montana NIBRS system includes a code for stalking, as well.

The MBCC also receives data directly from domestic violence and sexual assault service providers in the state. The state has developed the Providers of Data Quality (PDQ) database, which is a customized database developed for tracking domestic and sexual violence statistics in Montana. Every program receiving domestic or sexual violence funding in the state is required to file quarterly reports detailing demographic information on the victims they serve, the crime they suffered, and the services they received. After the validity of the data is assessed, it is downloaded by the state's domestic and sexual violence funders, usually the Department of Public Health and Human Services and the Montana Board of Crime Control. Roughly 70 nonprofit service providers submit quarterly reports through the PDQ. The information is also available to local service providers and local police departments. All of the data are available online through the Montana Coalition Against Domestic and Sexual Violence Web site. The Board of Crime Control will share information upon request.

The Montana Domestic Violence Fatality Review Commission examines the trends and patterns of domestic violence-related fatalities in Montana. The Commission, in addition to using law enforcement data, interviews the families of both the offender and victim. Information is released in reports to the legislature.

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Nebraska

Domestic Violence Legislation:Yes (Section 28.323)
NIBRS Status:Certified
Additional IBR Elements:Yes
Law Enforcement DV System:Incident-Based/Summary
Service Provider DV System:Incident-Based
Service Provider SA System:Incident-Based

Nebraska does have legislation that defines domestic violence, including violence between same-sex partners. The Nebraska Commission on Law Enforcement and Criminal Justice collects crime statistics from the law enforcement agencies in the state. Nebraska is NIBRS-certified, with additional data elements being collected. These include additional data values:

  • Offenses: Gas from self-service station and minor in possession
  • Location types: Farm building and sidewalk/driveway/yard
  • Weapon type: Semi-automatic
  • Property descriptions: Grain/hay/feed and herbicides/insecticides
  • Victim type: Law enforcement officer
  • Relationship of victim to offender: Ex-boy/girlfriend
and additional data elements:
  • Geocode (in Administrative segment)
  • Felony (in Offense and Arrestee segments)
  • State Statute Number (in Arrestee segment)
Drug type and criminal activity data elements are also included in the Arrestee segment.

Agencies that do not report incident-based data complete Offense/Activity Reports, submitted monthly. On these forms, domestic violence incidents are noted with a 'D' added to the offense code. No incident-level information is recorded. Currently, roughly 60 of the 164 law enforcement agencies submit incident-based data. In addition to collecting law enforcement data, the Commission also conducts statewide surveys. Last conducted in 1997, these surveys focused on public attitudes toward various criminal justice issues rather than criminal victimization. Nebraska also recently passed legislation on firearm restrictions to include individuals convicted of any domestic violence misdemeanors or who are a respondent on a protection order.

The Commission's Information Services Division maintains the state's domestic violence and sexual assault service provider system and protection order database. The service provider database includes summary information on the number of clients and services provided, as received from the Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Coalition. The Nebraska State Police maintains the state repository of criminal history records and fingerprints. The Nebraska Judicial Branch maintains the state protection order registry, which is accessible to all law enforcement agencies in the state. The State Police oversees the Foreign Protection Order Registry.

The Nebraska Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Coalition collects client and event information on a standardized form monthly from pdf document local programs that the Coalition funds. The information is included in the Coalition's annual report.

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Nevada

Domestic Violence Legislation:Yes (NRS 33.017)
NIBRS Status:No Planned Involvement
Law Enforcement DV System:Specialized Incident-Based
Service Provider DV System:Summary
Service Provider SA System:No

Nevada has domestic legislation that includes same-sex romantic relationships. Although the state is not collecting incident-based data and has no plans to develop an IBR system, the Nevada Department of Public Safety has instituted an incident-level domestic violence data collection system. All 37 law enforcement agencies in the state report domestic violence data monthly using specialized scantron forms. The DPS also maintains the statewide database of protection orders, which is accessible to all state law enforcement agencies.

The Nevada Network Against Domestic Violence does collect statistics from local programs, which are published in quarterly newsletters. Member programs receiving Marriage Licenst Supplement, VOCA or Family Violence and Prevention Services funds voluntarily submit quarterly reports. These statistics are also shared with the Attorney General's Council for the Prevention of Domestic Violence. The Council uses the information, along with sexual assault data from the DPS, to determine funding and for legislative purposes and for their annual report. Information is shared upon request.

The Nevada Coalition Against Sexual Violence does not currently collect information from state agencies, but is in the planning stages of developing a data collection system.

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New Hampshire

Domestic Violence Legislation:Yes (XII:173-B:1)
NIBRS Status:Certified
Additional Data ElementsNo
Law Enforcement DV System:Incident-based
Service Provider DV System:Incident-based
Service Provider SA System:Incident-based

The state's domestic violence legislation does include same-sex relationships. The state is certified by the FBI to submit NIBRS data; law enforcement agencies submit data to the New Hampshire Department of Public Safety Division of State Police. Since incident-based reporting is not mandated in the state, approximately 146 of the 225 law enforcement agencies statewide report to the State Police. Agencies submitting summary offense counts do not report additional information on domestic and sexual violence incidents.

The State Police share the incident-based data with the New Hampshire Department of Justice, which also collects quarterly statistical reports from the New Hampshire Coalition Against Domestic and Sexual Violence. The Coalition collects client-based information from its 14 member agencies. These members use contact logs to collect information on the clients and types of services provided; personal identifiers are not captured in the database. The Coalition publishes the data annually; all data and reports are available upon request.

The Governor's Commission on Domestic and Sexual Violence collects information on domestic homicides; two advocates collect victim and offender information for every domestic and sexual violence homicide in the state using standardized report forms. The information is then entered into the Department of Justice's Homicide Database. The Commission also oversees the Domestic Fatality Review Committee, which conducts reviews of the domestic violence homicide cases and publishes statistics in an annual report. Data are available upon request.

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New Jersey

Domestic Violence Legislation:Yes (2C:25-19)
NIBRS Status:Testing
Additional IBR Elements:No
Law Enforcement DV System:Incident-based
Service Provider DV System:Summary
Service Provider SA System:Incident-based

New Jersey's domestic violence legislation includes same-sex relationships. Although the state does not collect NIBRS data, the New Jersey State Police requires all 566 law enforcement agencies to submit domestic violence incident reports on a monthly basis. These data are included in semiannual crime reports, which are available online.

The New Jersey Coalition for Battered Women collects summary domestic violence data from all state domestic violence shelter programs and one non-residential domestic violence program using a standard reporting form, which is submitted monthly. Data are available on its Web site and are submitted to the New Jersey Department of Human Services Division of Youth and Family Services.

The New Jersey Department of Community Affairs Division on Women collects sexual assault data from all state rape care programs. Programs submit sexual assault incident reports for each client, as well as year-end program performance reports. These data are shared with the New Jersey Coalition Against Sexual Assault, which posts them on its Web site, and with the NJ Domestic Violence Fatality and Near Fatality Review Board, which is also housed in the Division on Women. The data are used in reports that are available on its Web site.

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New Mexico

Domestic Violence Legislation:Yes (40-13-2)
NIBRS Status:Testing
Additional Data ElementsNo
Law Enforcement DV System:Incident-based
Service Provider DV System:Incident-based
Service Provider SA System:Incident-based

The state statute defining domestic violence includes incidents between same-sex partners. The state is not NIBRS certified but the New Mexico Department of Public Safety does collect incident-based data through the state Criminal Justice Information System (CJIS), a web-based repository accessible to approved criminal justice agencies. Roughly 75% of law enforcement agencies currently report incident-based data. Domestic violence incidents are flagged in the system and on arrest and fingerprint cards. Law enforcement agencies also submit domestic and sexual violence reports to the New Mexico Clearinghouse on Sexual Abuse and Assault Services of the New Mexico Coalition of Sexual Assault Programs.

The Coalition of Sexual Assault Programs maintains the New Mexico Interpersonal Violence Data Central Repository (NMIVDCR), which is the main statewide repository of domestic violence and sexual assault data. The NMIVDCR includes rape crisis and mental health center data reported monthly; law enforcement and service provider data reported quarterly; and sexual assault nurse examiner data, statewide victimization surveys, and court reports provided annually. The law enforcement, court, and victimization survey data also include stalking offenses. All data are submitted voluntarily. The Clearinghouse uses the reported information in annual reports that are distributed to all law enforcement and service providers, as well as to the state legislature and Governor's Office.

The New Mexico State Coalition Against Domestic Violence collects aggregate service and client-level data annually from its 31 member programs. The Coalition also maintains a database of domestic violence homicides reported in newspapers. Information is regularly provided to the media, law enforcement agencies, courts, funding agencies, and grantees.

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New York

Domestic Violence Legislation:Yes (SOS Article 6-A, 459-a for a definition of domestic victims)
Also see CPL 530.12 for order of protection legislation
NIBRS Status:Testing
Additional Data ElementsYes
Law Enforcement DV System:Incident-based
Service Provider DV System:Summary
Service Provider SA System:Summary - Hotline Only


State Summary

The state statute defining domestic violence includes incidents between same-sex partners. The New York State's Division of Criminal Justice Services maintains the NYS Incident-Based Reporting Program; currently, 269 law enforcement agencies submit incident-based data and additional agencies are testing the system. The New York incident-based program does include elements in addition to what is required by NIBRS; these include:

  • location (city, town, village) code of incident
  • station/division/precinct identifier
  • offense number
  • incident larceny type
  • source of drug data
  • offender ethnic origin
  • level of injury
  • victim medical treatment
  • Offender-Based Tracking System number
  • NYS ID Number
  • arrest status
  • arrestee/charge link
  • arrest larceny type
The Division provides optional incident and arrest reports for agencies submitting incident-based data. Agencies may use their own forms but must collect all of the required information. In addition to submitting crime reports, agencies are required to submit separate Domestic Incident Reports. Data are published in annual reports and are available upon request.

The New York State Coalition Against Domestic Violence keeps track of the number of hotline calls received but does not collect individual statistics. The information that is collected is shared with the New York State Office for the Prevention of Domestic Violence, which provides resources to the public but does not collect additional information. The New York State Coalition Against Domestic Violence and the New York State Coalition Against Sexual Assault provide technical assistance to local sexual assault service providers but do not collect victim or service data. The New York City Alliance Against Sexual Assault does not routinely collect sexual assault data but is involved in several New York State Coalition Against Domestic Violence related research projects, detailed below.

The New York State Office of Children and Family Services collects aggregate data monthly from all domestic violence service providers in the state. Data are published in its annual report. The New York State Office of Victim Services tracks the number of claims paid during the reporting period by type of crime, including domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking, as well as the number sexual assault examination claims. The information is used only for grant purposes and is not provided in reports.


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North Carolina

Domestic Violence Legislation:Yes (§50B-1)
NIBRS Status:Testing
Additional Data ElementsYes
Law Enforcement DV System:Incident-based
Service Provider DV System:Summary
Service Provider SA System:Summary

The state statute defining domestic violence does not includes incidents between same-sex partners. The North Carolina State Bureau of Investigation Crime Reporting and Statistics Unit maintains the state Uniform Crime Reporting program; although the state is not NIBRS certified, most law enforcement agencies submit incident-based data. There are two levels of reporting - Level II and pdf document Level III; Level III incident data are NIBRS compatible. The majority of agencies, approximately 250, report Level II, while around 15 agencies submit Level III data. Roughly 2% of agencies submit summary counts of offenses. The Level III system does include elements in addition to what is required by NIBRS; these include:

  • incident status (further investigation, inactive, closed/cleared, closed/leads exhausted)
  • domestic incident (yes, no)
  • incident tract (optional)
  • incident latitude/longitude
  • rape place of encounter (location codes to indicate where the victim of a rape first encountered the offender)
  • law enforcement activity (responding to disturbance calls, burglaries in progress, robberies in progress, attempting other arrest, civil disorder, handling/transporting/custody of prisoners, investigating suspicious persons or circumstances, ambush, mentally deranged, traffic pursuits/stops, other)
  • law enforcement assignment (2-man vehicle, one man alone, one man assisted, special alone - detective/undercover, special assisted, other alone - off-duty/on foot, other assisted
  • fingerprint card check digit (optional)
  • arrest tract (optional)
  • arrest charge type (felony, misdemeanor, infraction)
  • charge count
  • offense jurisdiction (yes, no)
  • School Resource Officer arrest (yes, no)
  • suspected arrest drug type (list of drugs as in property section)
  • estimated arrest drug quantity
  • type arrest drug measurement
In addition to these, several data elements were expanded to include additional data values:
  • location data element was expanded to include home of victim, home of offender, residential care facility and other residence
  • victim type was expanded to include law enforcement officer in the line of duty
  • relationship of victim to offender was expanded to include ex-boy/girlfriend and care recipient
  • type of arrest was expanded to include order for arrest and warrant for arrest, and summons and citation were broken into separate values
  • disposition of arrestee under 16 was expanded to include referred to juvenile court/probation agency, community agency/program, other police agency, and criminal/adult court
Summary data are published in an annual report and are available upon request.

The Governor's Crime Commission Criminal Justice Analysis Center conducts a victimization survey about every five years. The last survey was conducted in 1999 and was a duplicate of the 1997 survey. Reports on the 1997 survey are available on its Web site, along with some research reports focusing on domestic violence. The North Carolina Council for Women / Domestic Violence Commission provides funding to local displaced homemaker programs, domestic violence programs and local sexual assault programs. The Council also certifies abuser treatment programs for use by the North Carolina courts. All programs receiving funding from the Council must submit data reports twice a year, while the abuser treatment programs submit data quarterly. The information is compiled into a spreadsheet and used in an annual report. Both are available from its Web site and by request.

Neither the North Carolina Coalition Against Domestic Violence nor the North Carolina Coalition Against Sexual Assault collect statistics from local service providers; rather, both request data from the Council for Women / Domestic Violence Commission. The Domestic Violence Coalition also collects information on domestic violence-related homicides from community reports and newspapers. The information is provided on its Web site and is used in an annual report.

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North Dakota

Domestic Violence Legislation:pdf documentYes (14-07.1)
NIBRS Status:Certified
Additional IBR Elements:Yes
Law Enforcement DV System:Incident-based
Service Provider DV System:Summary Counts
Service Provider SA System:Summary Counts

North Dakota does have legislation defining domestic violence which does include same-sex romantic relationships. North Dakota, a NIBRS-certified state, has introduced data elements in addition to what is required by the FBI. Three offense codes have been added to capture information on stalking, suicide and vehicular manslaughter. The relationship codes have been expanded to include former boy/girlfriends and peace officers. Six additional location codes have also been added, including:

  • Elementary/Secondary School
  • Farm Building
  • Grain Elevator
  • Drilling/Tank Site
  • Mine Site
  • College/University
A code to identify an incident as domestic in nature has been added as well.

The North Dakota Office of the Attorney General's Bureau of Criminal Investigation collects NIBRS data from all but two law enforcement agencies. A private contractor is used to collect domestic violence and sexual assault data from agencies not currently reporting NIBRS. Since 2005, local law enforcement incident reports include check boxes to indicate incidents that are domestic or sexual in nature, including same-sex romantic relationships.

The North Dakota Council on Abused Women's Services and Coalition Against Sexual Assault collects the count of new victims from 21 service providers in the state. Each provider completes a form monthly, collecting victim, offender, offense, and law enforcement information. This information is used to create fact sheets and is then shared with the Bureau of Criminal Investigation and the North Dakota Department of Health.

The Department of Health also distributes a questionnaire to law enforcement that includes questions about domestic and sexual violence. The information is then reported, along with other state data, to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention's Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System.

The Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation's Victims Services unit collects information from the domestic violence and sexual assault service providers in the state receiving Victims of Crime Act (VOCA) grant funding. Currently all of the domestic and sexual violence service providers except for one are reporting information to the unit. This information is not used for any research or publication, but is sent directly to the Federal VOCA office.


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Ohio

Domestic Violence Legislation:Yes (§3113.31)
NIBRS Status:Certified
Additional IBR Elements:Yes
Law Enforcement DV System:Incident-based
Service Provider DV System:Summary
Service Provider SA System:Summary

Ohio has legislation in place that defines domestic violence, including violence between same-sex partners. The state is NIBRS-certified and the Ohio Incident-Based Reporting System (OIBRS) is maintained by the Ohio Office of Criminal Justice Services (OCJS). Currently, approximately 270 (28%) law enforcement agencies report incident-based data to the Office. In addition to the NIBRS data elements, supplemental elements are collected, including:
  • geocode
  • incident address
  • method of operation
  • suspect/arrestee hair color
  • suspect/arrestee eye color
  • suspect/arrestee height
  • suspect/arrestee weight
  • suspect/arrestee scars, marks, tattoos and other characteristics

OCJS administers the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) funds for the state. These funds assist units of local government for pdf document local domestic violence projects to develop and strengthen effective law enforcement and prosecution strategies and provide services to combat crimes against women. The Office also provides funding for pdf document 60 additional projects, including the implementation of a statewide initiative, projects focusing on underserved populations, and shelter and related assistance initiatives. Fifty-four of the 65 shelters in the state receive funding. Each agency receiving funding from the Office completes semiannual performance reports and a supplemental survey, providing aggregate statistics, completed at the end of the funding period. These data are compiled in an annual report and shared with the Office of Health and Human Services.

The Ohio Domestic Violence Network does not collect data from the local shelters, but has developed a Standards of Care protocol for health care providers. The Network also receives data collected by the Ohio Attorney General's Office and the Ohio Courts, which are consolidated and posted on the Network's Web site. The Network, along with the Ohio Department of Health Sexual Assault and Domestic Violence Prevention Program, also oversees the Ohio Sexual and Intimate Partner Violence Prevention Consortium. The Consortium does not collect data but is responsible for improving statewide planning for the primary prevention of sexual and intimate violence.

The Ohio Attorney General collects data through three separate divisions. Summary reports on domestic violence incidents are submitted to the Bureau of Criminal Identification and Investigation from law enforcement agencies in the state. These statistics are included in its annual report and are available upon request. The Crime Victim Assistance division also collects data from pdf document domestic violence and homeless shelters receiving divorce, dissolution and annulment fees from the local county commissioners. The division also collects summary statistics from performance reports submitted by all service providers receiving Victims of Crime Act (VOCA) and State Victims Assistance Act (SVAA) grants. All data are available upon request. The Crime Victims Services division tracks the number of awards paid through the Victims of Crime Compensation Program by type of crime, including domestic and sexual violence. These data are published in an annual report.

The Sexual Assault and Domestic Violence Prevention Program of the Ohio Department of Health collects aggregate data from pdf document sexual assault and rape prevention programs that receive Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) grants, as well as information on hotline calls. The Department also administers the state's Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), including the domestic violence and sexual assault modules. These data are reported to the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion division of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. All of the information is available on the CDC Web site.

All 88 Domestic Relations district courts report data on intrafamily domestic relations cases to the Supreme Court of Ohio Case Management Section monthly. These data are published in the Supreme Court's annual report and aggregate data are available upon request.

The Health Policy Institute of Ohio creates county profiles of abuse using data from children's services, law enforcement, courts, and the health department. These profiles are available online.

The Ohio Highway Patrol maintains the repository for protection orders in the state. Each law enforcement agency submits the protection order information via the Law Enforcement Automated Data System (LEADS). This information is also made available nationally through the FBI's National Crime Information Center system.

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Oklahoma

Domestic Violence Legislation:Yes (Title 22, 60-1)
NIBRS Status:Certified
Additional IBR Elements:Yes
Law Enforcement DV System:Incident-based
Service Provider DV System:Incident-based
Service Provider SA System:Incident-based

Oklahoma does have domestic violence legislation that includes same-sex romantic relationships. Currently, the state is certified to report State Incident-Based Reporting System (SIBRS) data to the FBI and 235 of the state law enforcement agencies are submitting data. The system is very similar to NIBRS, with the exception that a separate domestic violence code is available under report type. The Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation (OSBI), which developed SIBRS, also collects additional identifying information for victims, such as date of birth, height, weight, hair and eye color, marital status, driver's license number, and social security number. These additional data elements are also collected for suspects/arrestees, as well as information about employment/occupation and gang or tribe affiliation. Vehicle information is also captured, including type, tag number, year, VIN, make, model, style, and color. The OSBI also maintains a separate data collection system for domestic violence incidents reported by agencies not currently reporting SIBRS data. Summary counts of domestic violence incidents are submitted monthly on a standardized form. All data are available upon request.

The Oklahoma Office of the Attorney General maintains the Domestic Violence Fatality Review Board database, which includes information since 1998. The Board is statutorily authorized to collect data from 11 different sources including law enforcement and court records. Select data are published in annual reports.

Information from domestic violence and sexual assault programs is collected by the Office of Attorney General Victims Services Unit. The domestic violence and sexual assault programs funded by the Attorney General's Office report information on client demographics and services via the Oklahoma Victim Information System (OVIS) and the OAG Web-based data collection portal. The Oklahoma Coalition Against Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault does not collect any information from state service providers.


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Oregon

Domestic Violence Legislation:Yes (107.700)
NIBRS Status:Certified
Additional Data ElementsNo
Law Enforcement DV System:Incident-based / Summary
Service Provider DV System:Summary
Service Provider SA System:Summary

The state definition of domestic violence includes persons who are currently living together or who lived together in the past or couples who are sexually intimate, regardless of sex. Agencies submit crime information to the Oregon State Police Criminal Justice Information Services Unit. Summary agencies also submit a count of the number of offenses associated with domestic disturbances. The Oregon Criminal Justice Commission's Statistical Analysis Center funded a victimization survey which included domestic and sexual assault and stalking. The report, as well as state crime data, are available from the Center's Web site.

The Oregon Coalition Against Domestic and Sexual Violence does not collect any statistics from service providers in the state; instead, granting agencies collect service information from agencies that receive funding. The Oregon Office of Homeland Security Criminal Justice Services Division requires grantees to submit summary program progress reports. This information is not currently available to the public.

The Oregon Department of Human Services Injury and Violence Prevention Program compiles data from the Hospital Discharge Index, surveillance surveys, inpatient and emergency hospital records, law enforcement data, medical examiner reports, and victimization surveys into the Intimate Partner Violence Data Collection Project. These data are used for various reports to examine both domestic and sexual violence. All reports are available from its Web site.

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Pennsylvania

Domestic Violence Legislation:Yes (23, §6101)
NIBRS Status:Testing
Additional Data ElementsNo
Law Enforcement System:Incident-based
Service Provider DV System:Summary
Service Provider SA System:Summary

The state statute defining domestic violence includes incidents between same-sex partners. The state is testing an incident-based reporting system that does not include any additional data elements other than what is required by NIBRS. Every law enforcement agency is required to submit data via the Web. Until the incident-based system is fully implemented, law enforcement agencies have the option of reporting either incident-based or summary data to the Pennsylvania State Police Uniform Crime Reporting Unit. No additional information is collected in regard to domestic or sexual violence incidents. Monthly and annual summary data are available through an online query system, as are annual reports.

The Pennsylvania Coalition Against Domestic Violence maintains a domestic violence fatalities database as collected from newspapers. Aggregate data are also collected from its 76 member programs. Information is collected for funding purposes only and is not currently available to the public. The Coalition also maintains the statewide Protection from Abuse Database, which connects all county, state, and local police officers, judges and court personnel. Aggregate data are available upon request. The Pennsylvania Coalition Against Rape collects monthly aggregate data from 52 sexual assault service providers in the state. The Coalition is developing an annual report and submits quarterly statistics to the Pennsylvania Department of Public Welfare.

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Rhode Island

Domestic Violence Legislation:Yes (§12-29-2)
NIBRS Status:Certified
Additional IBR Elements:No
Law Enforcement DV System:Incident-based
Service Provider DV System:Incident-based
Service Provider SA System:Incident-based

Rhode Island has legislation defining domestic violence, including violence between same-sex partners. The state is NIBRS-certified and all law enforcement agencies are required to report NIBRS data to the Rhode Island State Police. Currently, 36 of the 38 law enforcement agencies are reporting; the remaining 2 (including Providence) are transitioning to the incident-based system. No additional data elements are collected outside of what is required by the national program. The data are used in annual reports and are available upon request.

All law enforcement agencies also send domestic violence, stalking and sexual assault incident and arrest information to the Judiciary of Rhode Island Domestic Violence Training and Monitoring Unit using a standard reporting form. The data are available on its Web site. The Office of the Attorney General's Domestic Violence/Sexual Assault Unit also maintains a database of all domestic violence and restraining order cases that come through the court system. Family and district courts fax all No Contact Orders directly to the Attorney General's Office daily, while domestic violence information is entered directly into a database from a standardized form. Quarterly and annual reports are provided to the state Violence Against Women Act grant administrators.

The Rhode Island Coalition Against Domestic Violence collects information on clients and the services provided from their six member programs. The Coalition also receives aggregate data from the Rhode Island Judiciary; the two sources of data are included in its annual report. The Sexual Assault and Trauma Resource Center of Rhode Island also collects information from its member programs, but the data differs depending on the program. Aggregate data are provided in its annual report.

Both the Sexual Assault Trauma Resource Center and the Coalition Against Domestic Violence report aggregate data to the Rhode Island Department of Health's Violence Against Women Prevention Program. These data were collected by the former Violence Against Women Public Health Surveillance System, which was funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) from 1994 until 2000. It tracked all domestic and sexual violence of women 12 and older, and included law enforcement, prosecution, and forensic lab information. Although the system is no longer funded, the Department plans to use intimate partner violence and sexual assault modules in their future Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance surveys, also funded by the CDC.

The Rhode Island Office of the State Medical Examiner participates in the National MCH Center for Child Death Review Program via a Web-based reporting system that includes domestic violence-related child deaths. The Rhode Island Child Death Review Team uses a modified version of the national data collection form. The Office also participates in the National Violent Death Reporting System, which includes deaths related to domestic violence. The state system, the Rhode Island Violent Death Reporting System, collects a modified subsample of the data elements captured in the national system. Aggregate statistics from both datasets are provided upon request.

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South Carolina

Domestic Violence Legislation:Yes (20-4-20)
NIBRS Status:Certified
Additional Data Elements:Yes
Law Enforcement DV System:Incident-Based
Service Provider DV System:Summary Counts
Service Provider SA System:Summary Counts

South Carolina does have domestic violence legislation but it does not include same-sex relationships; dating relationships are included only if the participants are currently living together or have lived together in the past. The state is certified to collect NIBRS data and all law enforcement agencies in the state report incident-based data to the South Carolina Law Enforcement Division. Elements in addition to what is required by the FBI are collected, including:

  • Case Status Indicator
    • administrative closure
    • unfounded
    • administrative filler
  • Case Status Date
  • Victim Suspected of Using
    • alcohol
    • drugs
  • A second Location Type variable
  • Automatic/Semi-Automatic Firearm
  • Special Circumstance Codes
    • bomb threat
    • carjacking
    • gas "drive-off"
    • hate/bias motivated
    • offender mentally ill/unstable
    • joy ride with motor vehicle
    • mutilated
    • assault victim is police officer
    • offender committed suicide
    • safe cracking
    • youth gang activity
Additional data values have also been added for:
  • Location Code (apartment/condominium, mall/shopping mall, college/university, and highway rest area)
  • Weapon Type (drowning and strangulation/hanging/suffocation/gas have been broken into separate options; pushed/thrown from high place)
  • Resident Status of Offender and Arrestee (this jurisdiction, state, outside state, unknown)
  • Aggravated Assault/Homicide Circumstances (institutional, drive-by/sniper)
The Division also maintains the state database of protection orders, accessible only to law enforcement agencies.

The South Carolina Coalition Against Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault collects summary statistics from 23 service providers on the number of children and women served or turned away. No formal collection strategy is in place; the Coalition calls each service provider for the information, which is then entered into a spreadsheet. The Coalition shares the statistics it gathers with the South Carolina Victim Assistance Network and the South Carolina State Office of Victim Assistance. The Coalition does not publish data, but information is available upon request.

The service providers also report to the agencies that provide them with grants. The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control provides funding to sexual assault service providers, while the South Carolina Department of Social Services provides funding to domestic violence service providers. The Department of Health and Environmental Control also administers the state Behavior Risk Factor Surveillance System survey, which includes the sexual violence module.

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South Dakota

Domestic Violence Legislation:Yes (25-10-1)
NIBRS Status:Certified
Additional IBR Elements:Yes
Law Enforcement DV System:Incident-based
Service Provider DV System:Summary
Service Provider SA System:Summary

South Dakota does have legislation defining domestic violence but only for people who have been married, are currently or have previously lived together, or have a child together. There is no distinction made between sexes. The state is certified to report NIBRS data and has added pdf document supplemental data elements to the state system. Currently, 121 of 130 law enforcement agencies are reporting incident-based data to the South Dakota Division of Criminal Investigation using one of two forms. The long form contains the NIBRS elements plus 79 additional elements, while the short form contains 21 additional elements. The Identification Section of the Division maintains fingerprint cards, which include a checkbox to indicate domestic violence and stalking arrests. Data are available by request.

The South Dakota Coalition Against Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault collects information about its member programs based on grant requirements. This information is included in publications that will be available online. The South Dakota Network Against Family and Domestic Violence does not provide any direct services and so does not collect any data in the state; however, the Network does get domestic violence data from the Department of Social Services.

The South Dakota Department of Social Services is responsible for collecting data on domestic violence, stalking, and sexual assault as required by the Victims of Crime Act. Roughly 55 agencies submit data online to the Department; these data include the number of adult and child victims, victim demographics, and any services provided. Data are available upon request.

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Tennessee

Domestic Violence Legislation:Yes (39-13-111)
NIBRS Status:Certified
Additional Data Elements:Yes
Law Enforcement DV System:Incident-Based

The state domestic assault statute includes partners who are currently living, or have previously lived, in the same residence or have a child in common, regardless of sex. The state is NIBRS-certified and all law enforcement agencies and roughly 100 campus police departments submit incident-based data to the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation's Crime Statistics Unit. Elements collected in addition to the required NIBRS elements include whether the victim was transported to a safe place and whether the offender violated an order of protection. Incident reports also include a separate check box to indicate whether an offense is domestic in nature. The Bureau publishes domestic and sexual assault and stalking data in an annual report and also maintains a database of protection orders filed in the state, accessible by law enforcement. Data are available online and by request.

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Texas

Domestic Violence Legislation:pdf documentYes (4.71.001)
NIBRS Status:Certified
Additional IBR Elements:Yes
Law Enforcement DV System:Incident-based
Service Provider DV System:Incident-based
Service Provider SA System:Incident-based

Texas has legislation the defines domestic violence, distinguishing dating violence from family violence. The statute does include relationships between same-sex individuals. The state is NIBRS certified, with about 61 of the 1020 law enforcement agencies reporting incident-based data to the Texas Department of Public Safety UCR Program. All domestic violence incidents are flagged in the TIBRS database. Agencies that report summary data to the state submit Family Violence Report forms monthly. These reports are completed for each incident. All law enforcement agencies are also required to submit Family Violence Incident Status Reports, listing the total number of family violence incidents for the month. The Department uses the Status Reports to ensure that Family Violence Reports have been submitted for every reported incident. The collected information is published in the annual state crime report; a separate section of the report focuses on family violence. Information is available upon request.

The Texas Council on Family Violence maintains the National Domestic Violence Hotline and keeps track of the number of calls by state. Individual information is not collected. The Council does produce an annual report on the types of services provided to victims. The only sexual assault data collected by the Texas Association Against Sexual Assault was from a random telephone survey of 1,200 adult Texans conducted in 2003. Findings of this survey were published in a report, which is available from their Web site.

The Texas Health and Human Services Commission collects data from 92 agencies throughout the state, including both family violence agencies and non-residential programs. Agencies enter victim information directly into the Integrated Tracking System for Sexual Assault/Domestic Violence Programs database. The Commission also requires quarterly narrative reports and monthly statistics reports. Data may be available upon request.

The Attorney General's Sexual Assault Prevention and Crisis Services division also uses the Integrated Tracking System to report domestic and sexual violence client information from all funded programs. The Attorney General's Victims' Compensation Services division collects data from victim applications and publishes this information by type of crime in an annual report. The annual report is available on their Web site.

County and District Attorney's Offices have victims complete Victim Impact Statements, which are then sent to the Texas Department of Criminal Justice Victim Service Division. The Division contacts victims to inform them of the outcome of the case and status of the offender. The Attorney Offices also complete semiannual Victim Impact Statement Activity Reports, which summarize the number of impact statements taken by offense and month. These data are only for internal use. A statistical report is published that includes information on offenders that are incarcerated or placed on supervision. These statistics are listed by offense type.

The Women's Advocacy Project collects domestic violence and sexual assault data from statewide victim hotlines. Caller information is logged on an intake worksheet and then entered into the database. Information is available upon request. The Governor's Commission for Women does not collect data but rather uses data from the Council on Family Violence. The Commission did survey law enforcement officers about their experiences responding to domestic violence incidents; a report is available from their Web site.

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Utah

Domestic Violence Legislation:Yes (30-6-1)
NIBRS Status:Certified
Additional Data ElementsNo
Law Enforcement DV System:Incident-based
Service Provider DV System:Summary
Service Provider SA System:Summary

The state statute defining domestic violence only includes partners who are living or have lived together or who share a child, regardless of sex. The state is certified to report NIBRS data to the FBI, and roughly half of the law enforcement agencies are submitting incident-based data. No extra data elements are collected and there is no separate domestic or sexual violence data collection in place for agencies submitting summary data. Agencies submit crime data to the Department of Public Safety's Bureau of Criminal Identification. Annual crime reports and data are available from the Bureau Web site.

The Utah Commission on Criminal and Juvenile Justice conducts a victimization survey every other year. The Commission also conducted a sexual violence survey; the final report for both data collection efforts and the survey instruments are available online. The agency has also published research reports on sexual violence using law enforcement data.

The Utah Domestic Violence Council conducted a survey to identify gaps in services to victims of domestic violence. The Council also tracks domestic violence-related deaths; these reports are available online. The Utah Coalition Against Sexual Assault does not collect data from local service providers. Local agencies that receive grants do report information to the Utah Department of Health Violence and Injury Prevention Program. The Coalition and the Department of Health are collaborating to design a data collection system for the state. Both agencies have published reports based on the data being collected; all are available from the agency Web sites.

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Vermont

Domestic Violence Legislation:Yes (15 VSA § 1101)
NIBRS Status:Certified
Additional Data Elements:No
Law Enforcement DV System:Incident-Based
Service Provider DV System:Summary
Service Provider SA System:Summary

Vermont's domestic violence statutes do include romantic relationships between same-sex partners. The state is certified to collect incident-based data, and all of the law enforcement agencies in the state report data to the Vermont Department of Public Safety Criminal Information Center. These data are available from the Department's Web site, along with a program that lets users create tables. No additional data elements have been added to what is required by the FBI.

The Vermont Network Against Domestic and Sexual Violence collects data from the local service providers, who access the system and submit data directly. These data are included in an annual report. The Vermont Center for Crime Victim Services collects information from victims applying for compensation, which is also provided in annual reports. Both agencies provide the reports online.


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Virginia

Domestic Violence Legislation:Yes (§18.2-57.2---See Family Abuse)
NIBRS Status:Certified
Additional Data ElementsNo
Law Enforcement DV System:Incident-based
Service Provider DV System:Incident-based
Service Provider SA System:Incident-based

The state does not have a statute defining domestic violence but instead defines family abuse, which includes spouses and ex-spouses, couples who live or have lived together in the last 12 months, and couples with a common child. The statute does not limit family abuse offenses to heterosexual couples; this determination is up to the discretion of judges. The state is NIBRS certified, but no additional data elements are collected. All local law enforcement agencies report crime data to the Virginia State Police; the data are published in the incident-based annual crime report. The State Police also maintains the state records of protection orders, which are available to criminal justice agencies through the Virginia Criminal Information Network.

Virginians Against Domestic Violence and Virginians Aligned Against Sexual Assault merged to form the Virginia Sexual and Domestic Violence Action Alliance. The Alliance collects domestic and sexual violence and stalking data from all grant-funded domestic violence programs and a fluctuating number of rape crisis centers through the VAdata System. The information collected is collected at the person-level but does not include personal identifiers. Data are used in annual reports and aggregate data are available upon request. The Department of Criminal Justice Services' Criminal Justice Research Center also collects summary information from sexual assault service provider grantees.

The Virginia Office of the Attorney General recognizes localities that have instituted promising or innovative practices in responding to domestic violence in their communities through its Community Recognition Prorgram for Promising Practices in Domestic Violence Response program. In 2009, the Program honored the Loudoun Domestic Abuse Response Team.

The Virginia Department of Health's Office of the Chief Medical Examiner collects information on family and intimate partner homicides. Staff review death certificates, police reports, and autopsy reports to identify family and intimate partner homicides. A standard coding form is then used to collect the information for entry into the Family or Intimate Partner Violence Fatality Surveillance database. Annual reports are available from the Office's Web site and data can be requested.

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Washington

Domestic Violence Legislation:Yes (RCW 26.50.010)
NIBRS Status:Certified
Additional Data ElementsNo
Law Enforcement DV System:Incident-based
Service Provider DV System:Summary
Service Provider SA System:Summary

The state statute defining does include dating relationships between same-sex partners. The Washington Association of Sheriffs and Police Chiefs collects summary data from law enforcement agencies in the state monthly, including a summary form on domestic violence incidents. The domestic violence data are maintained in a separate database. Thye state is NIBRS-certified and is implementing a domestic violence indicator for all Group A offenses and is adding Violation of No Contact Order as a Group A offense. Currently, 22 agencies are reporting incident-based data to the state.

The Office of Financial Management's Statistical Analysis Center uses law enforcement data for research reports, including the Criminal Justice Data Book, which also includes court and jail data. All publications, as well as the law enforcement data, are available on the Center Web site.

The Washington State Coalition Against Domestic Violence collects data on domestic homicides and suicides from newspaper clippings. A subset of these cases are reviewed in-depth by local community panels, with standard forms being completed for each incident. Reports are published every other year and are available online. The Department of Social and Health Services collects aggregate data from domestic violence and shelter programs; these data are shared with the Coalition Against Domestic Violence. The Washington Coalition of Sexual Assault Programs does not collect any service provider data. These data are instead collected by the Office of Crime Victim Advocacy.

The Office of Crime Victim Advocacy, in collaboration with the Department of Social and Health Services, is developing the Washington InfoNet, a statewide client data system to replace the paper report forms currently used. Approximately 120 agencies will provide specific crime and victim information via the system. The Office uses the information to produce an annual client service summary report; data are also available upon request.

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West Virginia

Domestic Violence Legislation:Yes (§18.2-57.2 and see definitions)
NIBRS Status:Certified
Additional IBR Elements:Yes
Law Enforcement DV System:Incident-Based
Service Provider DV System:Summary
Service Provider SA System: 

West Virginia does have broad domestic violence legislation that includes same-sex romantic partners. The state is certified to report NIBRS data to the FBI. The West Virginia State Police collects incident-based data from all law enforcement agencies in the state, including a separate optional domestic violence incident report. Data elements related to domestic violence are collected in addition to what is required for NIBRS; these include:

  • response time
  • action taken (arrest, referral, contact magistrate, transport)
  • name of complainant
  • whether complainant has called in the past
  • number of times the complainant called in the past
  • protection order on file at time of incident
  • protection order filed after incident
  • incident violated a protection order
  • time involved in the incident
The State Police will produce ad hoc reports upon request. The Division of Criminal Justice Services' Statistical Analysis Center has worked with domestic and sexual violence statistics; several reports are available on its Web site. In 2009, The Center director received the Visionary Voice Award from the National Sexual Violence Resource Center for the Center's creativity, hard work and dedication to addressing and preventing sexual violence. The Center director serves on the state Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner Advisory Board, the Key Players in Rape Prevention Committee, and the West Virginia Sexual Assault Response Technical Team. Although no stalking data are currently collected, there are plans to collect this information in the future. There is no state database of protection orders.

The West Virginia Coalition Against Domestic Violence collects summary information from all of the 14 licensed domestic violence service providers in the state. The providers enter information directly into a database, which is submitted to the Coalition annually. The Coalition is in the process of developing an annual report for the public. All data are available from the Coalition Web site.

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Wisconsin

Domestic Violence Legislation:Yes (968.075)
NIBRS Status:Certified
Additional IBR Elements:Yes
Law Enforcement DV System:Incident-Based
Service Provider DV System:Summary
Service Provider SA System:None

Wisconsin's domestic violence legislation includes same-sex partners if they are currently living together or have lived together in the past. The state is certified by the FBI to collect NIBRS data. The Office of Justice Assistance (OJA) collects law enforcement data from approximately 35 of the 367 agencies in the state, including data values in addition to what is required by NIBRS. These include additional relationships:

  • other domestic violence victim
  • cohabitant
  • babysitter
  • ex-boy/girlfriend
  • professional care provider
  • professional care receiver
  • other business relationship
  • not a victim of this offender
and additional locations:

  • shopping mall
  • outbuilding
  • park
  • victim's vehicle
  • offender's vehicle
  • other vehicle
  • victim temporary lodgings
  • offender temporary lodgings
  • other temporary lodgings
  • victim residence
  • offender residence
  • other residence
Agencies not reporting incident-based data must complete a separate Sexual Assault report for each incident reported to the police. These reports are also collected by the state Office of Justice Assistance. Incident reports have separate check boxes for law enforcement to use when reporting incidents among domestic partners; however, no additional information is sent to OJA. The Office publishes annual reports on sexual assault, which are available online.

Local district attorneys in the state are mandated by statute to supply the Wisconsin Department of Justice with charging and disposition data for all domestic incidents. Fifty of the 72 counties share incident-level information via the District Attorney's Prosecutor Technology for Case Tracking (PROTECT) system. The counties that do not have access to the system instead provide the same information using a Web-based data entry program on the Department's Web site. The information is then combined and is used for annual reports, which are available from the Department's Web site.

The OJA's Statistical Analysis Center created a sexual assault database for service providers to maintain statistics on the services provided. This database is currently being formatted for Web-based reporting.

The Wisconsin Coalition Against Domestic Violence does not collect statistics from local service providers but does collect statewide information on domestic homicides. This information is collected from law enforcement, newspapers, and the public. The information is compiled into annual reports, available from its Web site. The Wisconsin Coalition Against Sexual Assault also does not collect local data, but does collect information from agencies who receive grants on the type and number of trainings conducted.

The Wisconsin Department of Health and Family Services collects summary data from 73 domestic violence service providers in the state. Programs submit information annually; the Department does not publish the information, but data are available to the public upon request. The Department also collects information on the number of hotline calls handled by select sexual assault service providers, but statewide information is not currently collected.

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Wyoming

Domestic Violence Legislation:Yes (35-21-101)
NIBRS Status:No Planned Involvement
Law Enforcement DV System:No
Service Provider DV System:Incident-Based
Service Provider SA System:Incident-Based

The State of Wyoming does have legislation in place defining domestic violence in the state, including same-sex romantic relationships. The Victim Services Division of the Office of the Attorney General currently collects incident-based crime data from all service providers in the state that receive state funds.

The Wyoming Coalition Against Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault does not collect information from its 24 member shelter organizations. Rather, the Coalition directs resources for statewide projects related to domestic violence and sexual assault.

The Wyoming Survey and Analysis Center does not collect domestic violence data, but instead analyzes and reports data collected by the Victim Services Division.