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California


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State Overview

Domestic Violence Legislation:Yes (Family Code 6209-6211)
NIBRS Status:Testing
Additional Data ElementsYes
Law Enforcement DV System:Incident-based
Service Provider DV System:Limited Summary and Incident-based
Service Provider SA System:Limited Summary and Incident-based


State Summary

The state's domestic violence legislation does include same-sex relationships. Although the state is not NIBRS-certified, the Office of the Attorney General's Department of Justice is collecting incident-based data. For the testing phase, 26 additional data elements are being collected, including:

  • California Offense Code - Mandatory
  • Latitude - Optional
  • Longitude - Optional
  • Day of the Week - Optional (Hate Crime Only)
  • Offensive Symbols/Words/Acts - Optional (Hate Crime Only)
  • Victim Connected to California CJIS Code - Mandatory
  • Type of Activity Circumstance - Mandatory (Law Enforcement Officer Killed or Assaulted (LEOKA) Only)
  • Assignment Type - Mandatory (LEOKA Only)
  • ORI (Agency Identifier) - Other Jurisdiction - Mandatory (LEOKA Only)
  • Domestic Violence-Related - Mandatory
  • Victim Last Name - Mandatory (Hate Crime/Homicide)
  • Victim First Name - Mandatory (Hate Crime/Homicide)
  • Victim Middle Name - Optional
  • Victim Organization/Affiliation - Optional
  • Victim Date of Birth - Optional
  • Offender Last Name - Optional
  • Offender First Name - Optional
  • Offender Middle Name - Optional
  • Offender Date of Birth - Optional
  • Offender Organization/Affiliation - Optional
  • California Arrest Offense CJIS Code - Mandatory
  • Arrestee Date of Birth - Mandatory
  • Law Enforcement Disposition of Arrestee - Mandatory
  • Arrestee Last Name - Mandatory
  • Arrestee First Name - Mandatory
  • Arrestee Middle Name - Optional

In addition to collecting incident-based crime data for the Crimes and Clearances database, the Department of Justice maintains sixteen databases, several related to domestic and sexual violence. Each require law enforcement to submit separate information, either electronically or by using standard report forms. Most notable is the Domestic Violence-Related Calls for Assistance database, which collects monthly summary statistical data on the total number of domestic violence-related calls received by law enforcement. Data collected include the number of cases involving weapons and the type of weapon used during the incident. Domestic and sexual violence information can also be retrieved from the Monthly Arrest and Citation Register, which provides information on felony and misdemeanor level arrests for adults and juveniles. The Offender-Based Transaction Statistics data can be used to find the final disposition, while the Violent Crimes Committed Against Senior Citizens database includes information on victims 60 years of age and older. The Department of Justice also maintains the California Restraining and Protective Order System, accessible to all law enforcement and court agencies, as well as agencies that sell firearms. All data are available upon request.

Neither the California Partnership to End Domestic Violence nor the California Coalition Against Sexual Assault collect any data from service providers. Instead, the California Emergency Management Agency Law Enforcement and Victim Services Division collects information from grantees through various reporting programs. These include:

The California Women's Health Survey, a project of the California Department of Health Services, California Department of Mental Health, California Department of Alcohol and Drug Programs, California Department of Social Services, Lumetra, and the Public Health Institute, is an annual survey of women in the state. In addition to demographic and health questions, the survey includes sexual assault questions and a domestic violence module. The results are published in a report available from the California Department of Health Services Office of Women's Health. Data are available upon request.

The Department of Health Services has also teamed up with the University of California, San Francisco Center on Social Disparities in Health to conduct the Maternal and Infant Health Assessment. Although the purpose of the assessment is to develop and evaluate health policies and programs, sexual and domestic violence questions are often included.

The Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development Medical Information Reporting for California (MIRCal) collects both discharge and emergency room data from approximately 460 hospitals licensed by the state using an online incident-based data collection system. The system collects information on the cause of the injury, including sexual trauma. The Department of Health Services Domestic Violence Section provides funding to local programs and collects aggregate counts of women seeking services.

The Victim's Compensation and Government Claims Board collects limited information from victims applying for compensation. Relationship information is not collected, so only sexual assault information can be gathered from these forms. The information is provided in an annual report, which breaks out the number of applications by crime type.


State Projects

  • pdf document California Courts Protective Order Registry
    The California Courts Protective Order Registry (CCPOR) is a judicial branch project to create a statewide protective order repository that will provide more complete, accessible information on restraining and protective orders. Access to protective orders through CCPOR will be available 24 hours a day, seven days a week (24/7) in all court jurisdictions and venues. By promoting victim safety and perpetrator accountability, the CCPOR supports the Judicial Council's strategic Goal IV, Quality of Justice and Service to the Public, and the related operational plan objective (IV.1.e) of improving "practices and procedures to ensure fair, expeditious, and accessible administration of justice for litigants in domestic violence cases."


  • Spousal Abuser Prosecution Program
    The Spousal Abuser Prosecution Program in the California Department of Justice seeks to help both victims and prosecutors of domestic violence offenses. Through program grants supporting "vertical prosecution," district attorneys and city attorneys are able to develop teams that specialize in the investigation and prosecution of domestic violence offenses. Victims are able to work with the same prosecutor and investigator from the time charges are filed through the sentencing of the offender. Trained counselors/advocates also work with the victim to make the trial process less traumatic and overwhelming.


  • American Indian Women Domestic Violence Assistance Program
    The American Indian Women Domestic Violence Assistance Program provides culturally appropriate services to American Indian Women victims of domestic violence. Program objectives include a crisis line, information and referrals, emergency shelter referrals, emergency food and clothing, emergency transportation, counseling, assistance with temporary restraining orders, culturally appropriate trainings, and community education programs.


  • pdf document Domestic Violence Assistance Program
    The Statewide Domestic Violence Assistance Program (DVAP) is designed to: 1) provide local assistance to existing service providers to maintain and/or expand services for victims of domestic violence and their children, based on need as demonstrated by prior service statistics, local crime statistics, current population and population projections, economic factors, geographic and cultural factors; and 2) provide local assistance for the development and establishment of domestic violence services to currently unserved and underserved populations, including, but not limited to, rural areas, non-English speaking groups, minorities, or geographical areas without services.


  • Domestic Violence Response Team Program
    The Domestic Violence Response Team (DVRT) includes a domestic violence advocate and a law enforcement representative. It may also include a domestic violence deputy district or city attorney, a probation officer, and a hospital representative or health care provider. The DVRT is designed to immediately respond to the secured scene of a domestic violence incident in person or by telephone when requested by law enforcement and provide crisis intervention services. If law enforcement does not request immediate response, the DVRT advocate must follow-up with the domestic violence victim within 48 hours of notification of the incident from law enforcement to provide intervention services.


  • pdf document Family Violence Prevention Program
    The Legislature designed this program to provide family violence prevention education and to increase general awareness of family violence prevention programs. Grantees collect and disseminate statewide, model protocols for intervention systems and provide training to agencies in dealing with family violence prevention.


  • pdf document Farmworker Women's Sexual Assault and Domestic Violence Program
    The purpose of this program is to develop and implement activities that educate and increase awareness of sexual assault and domestic violence among monolingual and bilingual Spanish-speaking and low-income farmworker women.


  • Law Enforcement Specialized Units
    The purpose of this program is to continue the efforts of law enforcement agencies to enhance or create specialized units to focus special effort on the handling of violent crimes against adult women, including sexual assault, domestic violence, and stalking. The specialized units accomplish this purpose through thorough investigation, immediate victim advocacy, and training for law enforcement officers. Thorough investigation leads to successful prosecution of cases, immediate victim advocacy provides victims with the support and resources to help disrupt the cycle of violence, and training assists departments in providing a consistent, effective, and compassionate response to female victims of violent crime.


  • pdf document Medical Training Center Program
    The purpose of this program is to ensure that forensic medical examinations are conducted statewide in a standardized, consistent and qualified manner by training medical personnel who perform examinations for child sexual and physical abuse and neglect, adult sexual assault, domestic violence and elder/dependent adult abuse. Training on evidentiary examination procedures is also provided to investigators and court personnel involved in dependency and criminal proceedings. This is accomplished through the development of a wide variety of curriculum guidelines and provision of training courses.


  • Native American Sexual Assault and Domestic Violence Program
    Native American sexual assault and domestic violence victims are severely underserved due to the lack of conveniently located or culturally sensitive services, lack of information regarding the dynamics of sexual assault and domestic violence and, in some cases weak linkages between tribal communities and non-tribal criminal justice and victim services systems. This project addresses sexual assault and domestic violence among this population.


  • pdf document Rape Crisis Program
    The program funds 84 rape crisis centers that service all 58 counties. Rape crisis centers assist sexual assault victims in dealing with the emotional trauma inflicted by the assault, provide assistance as these victims progress through the criminal justice system, and provide community education programs.


  • Rural Domestic Violence & Child Victimization Enforcement Program
    The purpose of this program is to enhance the safety of victims of domestic violence, dating violence, and child abuse by supporting projects uniquely designed to address and prevent these crimes in rural America.


  • Sexual Assault Response Team (SART) Program
    This program provides funding for Rape Crisis Center victim advocates to support and participate in the development and/or enhancement of local SART efforts to improve multidisciplinary responses to sexual assault victims.


  • pdf document State Coalition Technical Assistance and Training Program
    This project provides training and technical assistance to domestic violence service providers throughout the state. In addition, program funds are used to organize and coordinate efforts of victim service providers throughout California.


  • Statewide SART Collaboration Program
    This project provides assistance to develop and coordinate Sexual Assault Response Teams (SART) in California to ensure effective community sexual assault response systems. The objectives are: 1) development, enhancement and improvement of SART systems and efforts; 2) availability of effective, comprehensive sexual assault response systems for sexual assault victims; 3) identification of key procedures and protocols; and 4) coordination of SART policy needs.


  • Threat Management and Stalking Vertical Prosecution Program
    This program provides funds to District Attorney’s Offices to create or enhance specialized units to reduce the threat of victimization related to the crime of stalking through early arrest, prosecution, and sentencing of perpetrators charged with this crime. This program concentrates efforts and resources toward this offense, utilizing special investigators and vertical prosecution of offenders.


  • Violence Against Women Vertical Prosecution Program
    The purpose of this program is to fund specialized units in prosecutor’s offices in California to vertically prosecute crimes against women, including sexual assault, domestic violence, stalking, and dating violence. Vertical prosecution has shown to improve conviction rates, reduce victim trauma, and provide more consistent and appropriate sentencing.


  • California Restraining and Protective Order System
    The California Department of Justice (DOJ) houses the California Restraining and Protective Order System (CARPOS), a statewide database of persons subject to a restraining order. This database can only be accessed by court clerks and law enforcement. The CARPOS allows reported violations of restraining orders to be added to the existing restraining order record in the CARPOS. The violation message is designed to allow law enforcement and criminal justice agencies the capability to enter reported restraining order violations onto any record in the CARPOS. This information may assist prosecutors in building stalking cases and other types of criminal cases involving someone who has been the subject of a restraining order.


  • Domestic Violence and the Courts
    With funding by the California Department of Health Services (DHS), Epidemiology & Prevention for Injury Control (EPIC) Branch, this project supports continued education for judges and court personnel through the administration of stipend and mini-grant programs. It also provides information on batterers' fines collections per county through quarterly reports from the Domestic Violence Education and Training Fund.


  • Juvenile Domestic and Family Violence: The Effects of Court-Based Intervention Programs on Recidivism
    The National Center for State Courts (NCSC), in collaboration with the American Probation and Parole Association (APPA), will conduct a 24-month study of the effectiveness of intervention programs in the area of juvenile domestic/family violence. The project's goal is to document the effectiveness of court- and probation-based intervention programs on offender recidivism and post-treatment behaviors. Participant sites include the Santa Clara (CA) Juvenile Domestic and Family Violence Court, the San Francisco Youth Family Violence Court, and the Contra Costa County court system.


  • Public Policy and Research Committee
    The Public Policy and Research Committee of the California Partnership to End Domestic Violence works to improve domestic violence policy in California by advocating for legislation that increases protections for domestic violence victims and funding for support of programs. Members of the committee are representatives from the field of domestic violence throughout the state who draft, monitor, and testify in support of or against legislation related to domestic violence victims or service providers.


  • Spousal Abuser Prosecution Program
    The Spousal Abuser Prosecution Program in the California Department of Justice seeks to help both victims and prosecutors of domestic violence offenses. Through program grants supporting "vertical prosecution," district attorneys and city attorneys are able to develop teams that specialize in the investigation and prosecution of domestic violence offenses. Victims are able to work with the same prosecutor and investigator from the time charges are filed through the sentencing of the offender. Trained counselors/advocates also work with the victim to make the trial process less traumatic and overwhelming.


  • Teen Relationship Violence: An Examination of Juvenile Court Cases and Interventions
    Researchers from San Jose State University, supported by a grant from the National Institute of Justice to the National Center for State Courts, are comparing domestic violence courts in Santa Clara County, San Francisco County, and Contra Costa County to examine effectiveness and recidivism.


  • President's Family Justice Center Initiative
    The PFJCI is a pilot program administered by the Office on Violence Against Women that has awarded more than $20 million to 15 communities across the country for the planning, development, and establishment of comprehensive domestic violence victim service and support centers. The goal of the PFJCI is to make a victim's search for help and justice more efficient and effective by bringing professionals who provide an array of services together under one roof. The Alameda County Family Justice Center combines more than 50 organizations and 150 people working together to aid victims of domestic violence and their families.



  • Available Reports

    General Crime

    Domestic Violence

    Sexual Assault

    Violence Against Women


    Sample Data Collection Forms

    The Department of Justice collects information on domestic violence incidents from law enforcement based on this table:

    Law enforcement agencies complete these forms for the Department of Justice:

    The California Emergency Management Agency's Domestic Violence Section collects these progress reports from grantees:

    The California Emergency Management Agency's Criminal Justice Programs Division collects these forms from hospitals:

    The Department of Family and Community Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco conducts this assessment annually:

    The Victim's Compensation and Government Claims Board collects victim information using this form:

    The Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development collects hospital information using these three forms. The manuals are also noted:


    Available Data

    General Crime Statistics

    Domestic Violence

    Sexual Assault

    Violence Against Women


    Links to State Agencies and Resources